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February 10, 1974 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - 7-

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I I 11- 1 v I i,%o I I I %jr-x I q L,77"Tr=

r i

LOOKING

GIVE THE GIFT
OF LIFE AT'

I

THE U-M
STUDENT BLOOD BANK
MON., Feb.11... 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
TUES., Feb. 12... 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
WED., Feb. 13. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

THE WEEK IN
BATTLE LINES between the
University and its 1600 teaching
fellows and graduate assist-
ants appeared, by the end of
the week, to be fixed.
At a meeting Thursday night,
300 members of the Graduate
Employes Organization - Organ-
ization of Teaching Fellows
(GEO-OTF) decided to hold a
strike vote if the administration
fails to agree to a written con-
tract by February 17.
While expressing a readiness
to meet with TF leaders f o r
"talks", President Robben Flem-
ing was holding to the firm
stance he took earlier in the
week against "bargaining over
issues."
Although the package of TF
demands covers a range of eco-

REVIEW
nomic and academic issues, ob-
servers agree that the crucial
point of contention is recognition
of GEO-OTF as a bargaining
agent.
Fleming says the University
will refuse to do this unless
GEO-OTF gets official sanction
from the Michigan Employment
Relations Commission (MERC).
Many TF leaders read Flemn-
ing's, statements as an attempt
to "trap" their organization into
a costly and debilitating legal
battle. The past performance of
the administration in such af-
fairs has not allayed these fears.
In 1966, interns and residents
formed a similar association.
The Regents voted against
granting official recognition, and
in 1970 the interns took the case

to MERC for ajudication.
The University's corporate at-
torneys kept the case tied up in
the state courts for three years
until they finally lost in the Su-
preme Court in January of last
year.
Last fall the interns and resi-
dents inked their first contract
with the University - seven
years after they began.
The TFs are not willing to wait
that long. They see a strike to
force recognition as their only
option.
University officials concede
that a TF strike would bring
the educational process to a near
standstill. The only question is:
Will the TFs really do it ?
Clearly, most of them would
prefer not to. "If there's a vote
to strike, I'll strike, but most
of us really don't want to," a TF
leader admitted last week. "Be-

lieve it or not, we feel a respon-
sibility to our students."
And in many departments, ap-
athy is the prevailing attitude.
"I just don't feel oppressed,"
a History of Art TF said. "I real-
ly feel privileged to be teach-
ing. Besides, I don't think most
people understand the issue. It
(recognition of GEO-OTF) is not
a tangible thing like a demand
for more money."
Some observers feel GEO-OTF
was stronger last fall when the
issues were concrete and eco-
nomic: Specifically, the Univer-
sity's termination of special TF
tuition benefits followed by a gen-
eral 24 per cent tuition hike.
Then, the administration de-
fused the situation by reinstating
the lost benefits and granting a
small wage hike.
Fleming will try, in the next
two weeks, to cool this crisis

THUR., Feb. 14 .11

a. m.-5 p.m.

with more of the same. TF lead-
ers are in no mood to be bought
off. What remains to be seen is
whether their followers feel the
same way.
* * *
HOW MUCH POWER should
student committees have? Com-
mittee members feel they should
be able to dictate policy. Stu-
dent Services Vice President
Henry Johnson thinks otherwise.
Their dispute, which surfaced
this week, has its origins in a
move by members of the Hous-
ing Policy Committee to amend
University leases to give the
committee control over rent
rates. Housing Director John
Feldkamp blocked the move
and was backed by Johnson who
told him the policy committee
"does not have the authority to
supercede powers delegated to
the director."
The OSS policy committees
were established in the late six-
ties when "student power" pres-
sure on the administration was
at its peak.
Robert Knauss -- OSS-VP at
the time - promised to abide by
all policy committee decisions.
-.P V 1 i .

nd Floor-Michigan Union
INFO. CALL 761-6075
Jerusalemi the Golden:
The Historical, Religious and Architectural
Significance of the Eternal City in the Tra-
ditions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam.
Jerusalem in the Judaic Tradition
Monday, Feb. 4-4 p.m.-2402 Mason{
Jerusalem and the Islamic Tradition
Monday, Feb. 4-8 p.m.-Modern
Language Building, Lecture Room 2
PROFESSOR S. D. GOITEIN!
Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton University
Jerusalem in the Christian Tradition
Wednesday, Feb. 6-8 p.m.-Modern
Language Building, Lecture Room 2
PROFESSOR D. NOEL FREEDMAN
Director of Program on Studies in Religion at
The University of Michigan
The Sacred Monuments of Jerusalem:
AN ILLUSTRATED LECTURE
Thursday, Feb. 7-8 p.m.-Angell Hall,
Auditorium B
PROFESSOR OLEG GRABAR
Professor of Art History, Harvard University

...._...... _..........

fi(

Y~
#Y:
... . ...:.+.

I

in

s

roar

THIS SUMMER IN BOULDER, COLORADO, AN
OUTSTANDING GROUP OF SCHOLAR PRAC-
TIONERS WILL EXPLORE THE INTEGRATION OF
EASTERN AND WESTERN DISCIPLINES. THE
INSTITUTE WILL OFFER A TOTAL OF 75
COURSES TAUGHT BY 50 FACULTY MEMBERS.
AMONG THEM:

ANN ARBOR DANCE THEATRE
presents
10th ANNIVERSARY
CONCERT OF DANCE
February 15,16-8:30 p.m.
February 17-2:30 p.m.
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE AUDITORIUM
Monroe at E. University
ADULTS $2.50 STUDENTS $1.50
tickets available at Stangers and at the door

BEHIND THE
GREEN DOOR

BACK
When he stepped down from the
vice presidency two years ago,
he summed up his policy by
saying, "I think in this office,
where you are concerned with
student services ,that the pri-
mary and principal responsibili-
ty for determining what serv-
ices are needed should be in the
hands of the students that are
being served."
Just how seriously the posi-
tion of the policy committees
has deteriorated became clear
last week when Johnson respond-
ed to charges that he was illeg-
ally subverting the authority of
the committees.
' "These committees," he said,
exist only as creatures of. the
vice president . . . The director
(of the housing department) has
to be held accountable for a
final decision just as I am held
accountable. Effective participa-
tion can never be equated with
final decision-making power."
A long-time observer of the
campus scene, now employed by
the University, had this com-
ment on the Johnson statement:
"It' shows the advantage ad-
ministrators have. Students are
transients, while administra-
tors remain here for years. They
can give the students something
and then turn around a few
years later and take it away."
M A T T H 0 F M A N,
SGC's enigmatic right-wing gad-
fly, seems to have a knack for
stirring up racial tensions on
this already uptight campus.
Last week, it almost cost him
a bloody nose.
First, Hoffman offended Chi-
canos by contemptously munch-
ing non-union lettuce when they
made their pitch for SGC sup-
port of the farm workers' boy-
cott.
Then, he antagonized Asians
by his unsuccessful move to de-
pose Asian Affairs Director Ted
Liu for alleged use of physical
force on the night of Lee Gill's
resignation.
By the end of the meeting, on-
ly a cordon of ad hoc body
guards prevented Hoffman from
being pummeled by angered stu-
dents.
Hoffman's seemingly deliber-
ate baiting of racial minorities
remains a puzzle to SGC observ-
ers. Most agreed, however, that
given the current state of cam-
pus race relations, his timing
couldn't be much worse.
-CHRIS PARKS
DIAL 668-6416
1214 S. UNIVERSITY
Sat., Sun., & Wed. Promptly
at 1, 3, 5, 7, & 9 p.m.
Thur. & Fri. at 7 & 9 only

-

DOUBE FETURE
CAMPUS GIRLS
PLUS
THE SEXUALIST
gal&CIE

Chogyam Trungpa,
Rinpoche, Tibetan
Meditation Master,
Cutting Through
Spiritual Materialism.
Jean Claude van Itallie,
America, Hurrah,
playwright.
Allen Ginsberg, poet.
Ben Weaver, ex-
director Esalen Institute.
John Cage, composer.
Herbert Guenther,
translator-author-scholar.
The Tontric View of
Life.

Theodore Roszak, The
Making of the Counter
Culture, historian.
Jose Arguelles,
Mandala, The Trans-
formative vision, art
historian.
Stanislov Grof,
psychiatrist, LSD
researcher.
Ram Dass, Hindu medi-
tation student, Be Here
Now.
Baird Bryant, 'Easy
Rider,' cinematog-
rapher.

a

L---

For full brochure and information on transfer credit,
write to Naropo Institute, Department R, 1ii1 Pearl
St., Boulder, Colo. 80302
Join The Daily Ad Staff
Phone 764-0558

---- -1
mediatrics !presents
PAUL NEWMAN in,
THE LIFE AND TIMES OAF
JUDGE ROY BEAN
Would you believe a comedy about a hanging judge?
FRI. & SUN. $1.00 7 and 9:30
NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM
NEXT WEEK-The Incredible Bruce Lee in-FISTS OF FURY

SPONSORED BY:
PROGRAM IN JUDAIC STUDIES
PROGRAM ON STUDIES IN RELIGION
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION

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100's
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Nat. E, Mix Toe in Wheat 50's
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