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February 09, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pac Fiv

Pne' IA FLG

V.

McRae speaks

at

'reel world'

TONIGHT !
Univerity Players present BRECHT'S
the secon&

By ELIZABETH PYPA
Meredith McRae, most famous
for her role in "Petticoat Junc-
tion," yesterday attacked the
Hollywood industry in its discrim-
ination against women behind the
camera instead of in front of it.
The actress's informal discus-
sion was part of the five-day
film festival, "Women in the
Reel World," held in the Physics-
Astronomy Building.
Speaking of her years at Betty
Jo, she said, "In order to get
where you want to go, you
have to take certain jobs for
money. In "Petticoat Junction"
we were just three pretty girls
who were window dresing, hav-
ing no -minds, just having to
smile. Thank God I've progressed
from there."
Ms. McRae is currently invol-
ved in the California organiza-
tion, Women in Film, which striv-
es to place women in jobs that
ordinarilyare filled by men,
namely, producing and directing.
A recent success involved plac-
ing one of their members as

productions assistant in Motown
Productions.
Women are more and m o r e
turning to independent filmmak-
ing, she said, but getting some-
one to budget a film nrodiced by
a woman "is just awful."
Meredith McRae speaks from
the experience of being consid-
ered second banana to her hus-
band, an equal partner in the
production of their film, "Echo
of the Massacre."
"People would call," she said,
"And ask to speak to Greg. I'd
tell them, 'Look, I know as much
about this thing as Greg. If
there's anything I can do . ."
Their insistence killed the hell
out of me."
With the money from her film,
an anti-war story of a psychotic
ex-POW, Ms. McRae hopes to
build "our own little film em-
pire" giving jobs to many unem-
ployed actor friends.
"What I've done," she declar-
ed, "and all I really want to do
is be a filmmaker."

8 P.M.

POWE R CENTER

Tickets available at Power Center box office
Hours: 1 p.m.-5 p.m.; 6 p.m.-Curtain
For information call: 763-3333

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
Meredith McRae

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
Medie al music
John Mardinly performs in a lute recital held yesterday in Cook
Room, Law Quad, as part of the Medieval, Renaissance Colleguim.
Mardinly is a graduate student in engineering and has performed
professionally in New York.

Ensemble features.
upcoming composers

y

Guild

features

ranage

and beauty of weaving

By SARA RIMER
If you connect weaving with the pot holders you used to make
in first grade or the macrame samples hawked on the Diag
in warm months, you are in for a magnificient awakening at
the Ann Arbor Handweavers Guild's North Campus Commons
Exhibition.
Thirty-two women are displaying 73 works until Feb . 28 that
demonstrate the enormous range and beauty of weaving. From
vibrantly colored rugs to startling tapestries, the collection easily
transcends the ordinary samples one usually finds in shops and
galleries.
The Ann Arbor Guild was begun in 1956 with 17 members
meeting in each other's homes. The group expanded to 53 and
now meets in the Ann Arbor Art Association for special pro-
grams and workshops with prominent weavers.
Membership is limited to "working weavers" of Washtenaw
County who must submit two specimens to join the guild.
Ages vary as widely as the works on display. The young-
est members are of high school age while the oldest active
member, Blanche Griffitts, is in her 80's. The Leno and Spanish
lace techniques that she employs in her delicate, all-white Leno
lace sampler display sensitivity and skill that only age can have
refined.
Hawkins, who learned her craft at the age of 50, believes
that the person's character is more important than their age
in disposing them towards weaving. "It does take time and pa-
tience," she admits. "Many young people who are initially en-
thusiastic discover they'd rather be potters than weavers. Pottery
takes a lot less time."
Hawkins describes Ann Arbor as "an outstanding town for
weaving." She cites the Street Fair, which brings in people from
all over the country, as important in sparking interest. With 14
guilds making up the state league, Michigan is, in her words,
"an enormous state for weaving."
Laymen love to ask weavers, "How long does it take you to
d6 that?" Hawkins rebuffs the question impatiently, "It's im-
possible to say how long." Smiling, she adds, "A weaver would

By JEFF SELBST
There are all kinds of great
musical events on campus, and
some of the best of them are
free. The Contemporary Direc-
tions Ensemble presents a free
concert this evening at 8 p.m. in
Rackham Auditorium.
The Contemporary Directions
(CD) series, devoted to perform-
ances of works by both estab-
lished and upcoming composers,
is an outgrowth of the Com-
poser's Forum series, which was
begun in 1948 and features works
,by composition majors at the
University.
In 1968, two years after the
creation of the CD series, the
Rockefeller Fondation awarded
the largest single grant ever
given a music school expressly
for the purpose of subsidizing the
concerts. Performers were taken
from among the perfirmance
majors on a vol"ntary basis,
a id a stipend was given them
for each time thev appeared.
When the gr-nt r)n out in
1972, the ' . semhk' was born.
Now performance majors can
elect Cl) E isemble for credit as
they would any other ensemble,
and play for any of the concerts
as they are needed.
DIAL 668-6416
1214 S. UNIVERSITY
Sat., Sun., & Wed. Promptly
at 1, 3, 5, 7, & 9 p.m.
Thur. & Fri. at 7 & 9 only

Prof. George Wilson, acting
head of the composition depart-
ment, sees a lot of good coming
out of the concerts. For one
thing, the students' works receive
exposure. Also, since each work
is recorded as it is performed,
the graduating composer will
have a portfolio to take with him
and aid in his employment later.
Another e q u a I1 y important
thing, he said, is that "it gives
them a sense of the give-and-
take involved in writing music
to be performed. When a com-
poser works with the performers
who will be playing his piece, an
awareness of the problems of
performance enter into the writ-
ing."
In his cubicle office David
Robbins, conductor of the CD
Ensemble, described tonight's
program. The concert contains
works by the University compo-
sition and theory department
staffs. It also has a piece by
Wilson, one by himself, and a
piece by Prof. William Bolcom,
entitled "Dream Music No. 2,"
a piece with a definite jazz
sound.
"There's something for every-
one there."

"CH1LOE
IN THE AFTERNOON' IS DAZZLING!
A mature, immensely entertaining movie!"
-WILLIAM WOLF, Cue
"Rohmer's 'Chloe' is bea'utiful! "Rohmer's 'Chloe' is a comedy
Extraordinarily alive! A con- of very funny, complex con-
start pleasure to watch!" tradictions between action and
-ARCHER W INSTEN, word, image and sound. Im-
N.Y, Post mensely erotic."
-VINCENT CANBY,
"Aglow with atmosphere and New York Times
ambience. Beautiful cinema- " 'Chloe' is among the greatest
tography-all of it by the bril-
liant mind of the filmmaker." cinema."
-JUDITH CRIST, -BERNARD DREW,
New York Magazine Gannett News Service
"A warm, witty, sophisticated "Undoubtedly one of the films
comedy about love and com- most w o r t h seeing in New
mitment." York!"
--JOSEPH GLEMIS, -MOLLY HASKELL,
Newsday Village Voice
Chloie i. the Selected to
open the 10th
New York
A Film Festival
(ENGLISH SUBTITLES)
TONIGHT-FEB. 9
Aiiditoiiiin A-Angell Hall
MICHIGANCe
PREMIERECne a1

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
Reflections of weaving
tell you many happy hours."
The exhibit's works range from serviceable rugs and blankets
to hangings and tapestries that border on the surreal. The com-
pletely outfitted chair named appropriately "A Victorian Win-
ter, A Chair to Wear," appeals to anyone suffering energy cut-
backs in a cold climate. It requires only a blazing fire to rock
near.
An attached photo shows the weaver, Lois Kane, warmly
wrapped in the accompanying shawl, comfortably esconced in
the chair's thick, handwoven cushions. Its upholstery construct-
ed mostly of wool with small quantities of mohair, polyester, syn-
thetic and metallic fibers, the chair comes complete with wash-
ing instructions.
As Hawkins explains, "Sometimes just need itself will bring
forth something." Her son's waterbed led her to weave a beau-
tiful cover with an undulating pattern of blue and green ripples
and waves. Practicality also inspired her three hanging chess
sets. They can be easily packed up and taken anywhere.
Other works abandon practicality for an art approach. Le-
nore Lamsa's "Cross-Section," is a bold wall rug that represents
a tomato in the peak of ripeness. She employs the painstaking
technique of rya knots to create the tomato's rich core. Hawkins
laughingly reveals the woman's future plans for the "inside of a
lamprey's mouth."
Mary Lou Waller's woven sculpture with fur hangs in an in-
teresting combination of voids and solids. Equally provocative is
Margaret Thompson's "White Cloud." Dangling airily from the
ceiling in a puffy arrangement of metallic, white, and blue
fibers, it is a snow cloud designed from a chld's fantasy.
One is tempted to reach out a tentative hand to fully explore
the exhibit's works. Hawkins smiles when asked if the works
can be touched.
She admits, "When we go to exhibits at the Detroit Institute,
one of us distracts the guard, while the rest of us go up and touch
the work. Of course, I don't know about kids with ice-cream
cones, but you have to touch." Touching is essential in distin-
gushing between the different textures which range from soft
mohairs to stiff woven rugs.
The exhibit's works suit strikingly different environments. Of
Danielson's "Ad-Infi Knot- Im" a dark brown rope macrame.a
room divider incorporating burnished pieces of wood, Natalie Mc-
Minn, the North Campus Commons supervisor, remarks, "I
imagined that in a beach house. It's all sailors' knots, water, and
sand."
Doris Loftis' "Douglas' Square," a natural handspun wool
throw would add a handsome touch to a rustic mountain home.

I

STRE U
SREDFORD
THE WAY WE VVERE
COLUMBIA PICTURES ,n RASTAR PRODUCTIONSeme
A RAY STARK SYDNEY POL-ACIh Nodo m f:

MARLON BRANDO'S
ONE-EYED JACKS 1961
Brando directs and stars in this fast paced, action-packed color western. He
couldn't get along with the original director so he took on he task himself
with excellent results. With Karl Maiden.
SUN.: TRIUMPH OF THE WILL
MON.: THE SCARLET LETTER (starring Lillian Gish)
CINEMA GUILD 7and93 ADM. $1
9 a RHIETR

I

a

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603 E. Liberty
DIAL 665-6290
Open 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7 & 9 p.m.

231 S. State " Dial 662-6264

I

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"Switched-On Bach II." The long-awaited seccnd volume from music's
only composer-performer-conductor-in:;trument de igner and builder-
acoustician-recording engineer and possessor of gold record: Walter Carlos.
"Switched-On Bach I'I" includes the complete Brandenburg Concerto No. 5
plus more of Bach's most delightful pieces. "Switched-On Bach II." Walter
Carlos and his fabulous switchboard light up the clasica world again.
On Columbia Records and Tapes "' "

Open Daily 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7 & 9 p m

..ti:: .. Yt ": ....., s . .. .,. IIrW' i 'i:Y.C. 4..R +:'S ir''

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