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February 08, 1974 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.THE..ICH.GA. DA_.Y

Kiwanis sale:

Bargains galore!

Friday, February 8, 1974
Preliminary trucker

(Continued from Page 1)
wanis Club member Sallie Spring-
er. There were mothers with chil-
dren in tow, students looking for
cheap furniture, the old looking
for remnants of the past. All min-
gled in search of the jackpot, and
jackpots there are.
ANTIQUES, JEWELRY, TV's,
ice skates-the treasurers that fill-
ed the three story building were
endless. Even puppies, an upright
grand piano, and a limousine
awaited eager shoppers.
In the three days of the sale,
crowds will ruthlessly pick through
the merchandise that Kiwanis club
members collected from the com-
munity throughout the year.
Explains Springer, "Three weeks
before the sale, the ladies sort
mounds and mounds of goodies.
When we start, the rummage is
piled right to the ceiling. We have
everything from soup to nuts,
everything except room."

home. The largest beneficiary is
the Forney Clement Foundation for
Crippled Children at the Mott Chil-
dren's Hospital.
This year the Kiwanis Club hopes
to top last year's $30,000 profits.
BUT THERE is more to the sale
than bargains and charity. Sport-
ing 'Have a Good Day' buttons,
the 100 Kiwanis workers smiled
amongst the p u s h i n g jostling
crowd, communicating a warm
sense of camaraderie.
"I enjoy the sale because I get
to meet with many people I don't
see from one year to the next,"
says Springer. "It's the one big
thing where the Kiwanis wives get
together."
For the most part, the friendli-
ness was shared by the customers.
The excitment and the fun ran
tampant, and the prices were
great. Coats went for $10, refriger-
ators went for $50.
"WE'VE COME here for 20
years," said one woman. "I used
to be able to outfit all my kids
here. Now I think the prices are
too high. I don't have to come
anymore, but I still love to strike
a good bargain."
Most of the things are the usual
household junk found at rummage
sales, but some is valuable. A deli-

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cately embroidered dress made in will begin tomorrow afternoon., ag reem en t
1918, still in excellent condition, is "Our storerooms are full of
selling for $100. John Powers, the more," said Springer. "Bargain-*
man in charge of the antiques, ing on Saturday is the only way (Continued from Page 1)
said, "If no one buys it, we'll give we can sell it all." accept the proposed settlement.
it to a museum." By 11 a.m. on the last day, "IT'S A SELLOUT," said Roger
The jewelry department boasts loudspeakers will announce bags Galloway of Overdrive Magazine,
a 22 carat gold watch. of "goodies" on sale for low, fixed one influential organization which
prices. Anything that's left over, pushed for the shutdown that has
PRICES WILL remain set throu'gh the Salvation Army will take for brought guerrilla warfare tactics
tomorrow evening, and bargaining free. in some areas and left more than
Anti-McDonalds protest staged

(Continued from Page 1)

m

SPRINGER SAYS the sale's pur-
pose is to aid people in disposing
of their rummage while giving it
to others who want and need it.
Profits are donated to the club's
community projects which include
4-H clubs, Boy and Girl Scouts,
ENACT Centers, and a juvenile

PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY, Inc.,
DELTA RHO CHAPTER
PRESENTS

Three Dog Nighit

and

CHAMBERS
BROTHERS

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.

MID EAST PERSPECTIVES
ISRAEL AND SOUTH AFRICA:
partners in apartheid
HERB BOYD,
Black Studies Department, Wayne State University
WHY THE ENERGY CRISIS:
Arab blackmail or capitalist fraud?
ROBIN MAISEL,
Socialist Workers Party
WHY THE MIDDLE EAST PEACE
WONT HOLD.
ASHAF EL-BAYOOMI,
Professor of Biophysics and Chemistry
7 P.M.-FEBRUARY 8, 1974
ANDERSON ROOM, MICH. UNION
Young Socialists Alliance
Organization of Arab Students

mated diversion for noontime
passersby.
One marcher, having donned a
paper mache elephant's head rep-
resenting the council Republicans,
who tend to favor the new restau-
rant, danced hand-in-hand with a
disheveled Ronald McDonald cari-
cature.
Several others in the merry mob
carried cardboard boxes painted
like gargantuan "Big Mac" con-
tainers emblazoned with the slo-
gan "a quarter pound of crap."
The demonstration culminated
several months of concern and out-
rage over the proposed greasy
spoon-and a plastic spoon at that.
BESIDES destroying the Nickels
House - "an oasis of greenery"-
with its lush ivy and handsome
garden, the citizens fear that the
IMcDonalds will bring a flood of
cars, garbage, and other plagues.
McDonalds has tried to placate
the critics byhdesigning a unique
building for the lot next to the
arcade. "It will be a real special
animal," comments one company
representative.
Under the proposed plan, there
would be no garish golden arches.
The two-story structure is suppos-
edly designed - through land-
scaping and lighting - to fit in
with the older surrounding build-
ings.
SHABBAT SHALOM
Traditional Service-
6 p.m.
Liberal Service-8 p.m.
Torch starting-9 p.m.
FRIDAY, Feb. 8
HILLEL-1429 Hill St.

EVEN THESE assurances, how-
ever, do not satisfy the opposition.
"The thing will be the best look-
ing ugly McDonalds in the world,'
said one of the demonstrators.
"It will be an outrage . . . an in-
sult to the people who live anc
work in the area," lamented an-
other.
The McDonalds representative
claims traffic won't be a prob-
lem since the eatery will be a
"walk-in facility" and that two em-
ployes will be hired exclusively tc
pick up the discarded cups, pap-
fers, and other trash that encircle
fast food joints like a blanket of
snow.
snTHE HOUSE and its owner Ms.
B. Nickels Hall, whose grandfather
built the place, have a lot in com-
mon.
A
PERFE CT
OUTOFYOUR MATCHES
BEFORE THEY PUT THE UFE
4y~.rayOUT OF YOUR FORESTS,

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They both came into the world
shortly before the turn of the cen-
tury. Although now grey and
weathered by the years they re-
main warm and friendly.
Ms. Hall spends most of her time'
sitting in the prim, pastel yellow
livingroom; a heating pad across
her knees provides some comfort
from the chronic arthritis she suf-
fers.
SHE DOESN'T want to leave the:
home where she has spent over
half a century. But it's the leaving
that hurts - not McDonalds mov-
ing in.
"I always expected to be carried'
out of this house feet first," she
says, "But I never planned to get
arthritis either."
By going to a warmer climate,

CRISLER ARENA, U of M Campus
Ma rch 15, 1974
8 p.m.4

negotated
100,000 workers laid off. "They
sold these guys down the river."
More layoffs and more violence
were reported yesterday, and warn-
ings of food shortages by the week-
end were issued in the Northeast.
The Washington settlement was
reached by negotiators for the gov-
ermment and for some of the liter-
ally dozens of independent 'truck-
ers' groups which have sprung up
overnight to represent drivers who
own their own rigs and do not 're-
ceive hourly wages as do the
Teamsters.
BUT THE INDEPENDENTS are
highly disorganized among them-
selves, and drivers and spokesmen
for groups of strikers across the
country said they were not satis-
fied. The truckers' spokesmen who
made the agreement said they
needed 48 hours to explain it to
independents.
A few of the truckers and their
spokesmen took a wait-and-see at-
titude until they could hear details
of the proposal; spokesmen for
two of the groups of independents
said yesterday afternoon they fa-
vored acceptance of the offer.
But most drivers and trucker
spokesmen reached in a spot check
yesterday said it was too little, too
late..

Mvs. Hall nopes to ease her condi- A SPOKESMAN for Michigan
tion and escape the heavy tax bur- drivers said he opposed the settle-
den the house carries because of ment because it would apparently
its location, pass on to consumers higher fuel
"THERE ARE manygcosts which havesbeen absorbed by
"TER AE ay good mem- truckers. He said the public
ories in this house," she says, si- wouldn't "put up with it"and
multaneously smiling and blinking eventually many truckers would
back tears. "But I feel hemmed in lose their jobs to cheaper forms of
and they (McDonalds) can keep up transportation.
the property better than I am able State police patrols continued to
to now." post armed guards around convoys
Despite Ms. Halls' wishes, other of trucks carrying caritical sup-
people won't let the campaign to plies, and National Guardsmen
keep the Nickels house from going stood watch over the highways of
the way of all other homes in the eight states, but the violence con-
area die with yesterday's protest. tinned.
They are currently circulating An explosion was set off on the
petitions to halt the McDonalds. In surface of the Pennsylvania Turn-
three days, nearly '2,000 people pike just before dawn yesterday;
have signed the petition. a rock was hurled through a win-
dow of a Greyhound bus on the
THE EFFORT reminds a friend same highway, injurying one. wo-
of how Ms. Halls' father-Stafford' man. In Minnesota, a grocery truck
Nickels -- once shamed the city in- driver was beaten, truck tires
to repairing the street in front of ere s ashtrue traleshot was fired
the house.t-
After repeatedly asking the city THE SHUTDOWN continued to
to fill a large pothole in the then strike hard blows at the economy,
unpaved Maynard St., the exas- amid predictions of more similar
perated Nickels waited until afterj actions and pending food short-
a heavy rain had filled the crater. ages.
He then took out his fishing pole The agreement that led to the
nd n hatrnoondan nlatest government actions was an-
ah n spnthehaf.Teodangnounced shortly after 5 a.m. fol-
telinedinthe hexda. Teradwslowing a six-hour bargaining 'ses-
repared he ext ay.sion involving the truckers' six-
Unfortunately, to day it will pro- man negotiating committee, Penn-
bably take more than fishing ex- sylvania Gov. Milton Shapp and
peditions, demonstrations, and pe- three administration officials head-
tition drives to convince the city to, ed by special presidential assistant
save Stafford Nickels' house. W. J. Usery.
* -r .

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And at the Door

A WEEKLY LATE NIGHT
PRESENTATION OF
FEATURE FILMS

Annual
Ski Sale
25 5OoFF
SKIS
BOOTS
PARKAS
SKI PANTS
SKI SWEA TERS
SPECIAL CLEARANCE
Ice skates " Hockey Equipment
Bowling shoes " Snowmobile Gear
Bauer Hockey Skates
Reg. $17-$30...........NOW $13.50-$23.88
Hyde-Aeroflyte Figure Skates
Reg. $11-$35 ..... ..........NOW $8.88-$25.88
Tot Skates. Reg. $1.4........NOW $10.88
Cooper Hockey Gloves, Shin Guards, Elbow
Pads, Helmets, Hockey clothing ...............
NOW 20% OFF
Bowling Shoes. Men's ladies' by Hyde,
Brunswick, Dexter. 8 models. NOW 20% OFF
Snowmobile suits ................1/3 OFF
Snowmobile boots....................NOW $8.88
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