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February 07, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Rage Five

c1973: The Year in Pictures'
revives photo ournalistic art

Dramatic acting
Randall Forte as King Edward and Diane Daverman as Queen Ann in a scene from the University
Players production of Bertolt Brecht's, Edward the Second. The tragedy opened last night and runs
through Saturday at Power Center.
Eritca Jon g-poet, novelist,
Ei a
and fem intst reads at MLB

By DAVID BLOMQUIST
The familiar red-and-white
logotype of Life magazine return-
ed to the newsstands last week
in the form of a "Special Re-
port" entitled 1973: The Year iii
Pictures - the second such "Re-
port" to be issued since the one-
time queen of magazines folded
in December, 1972.
The first, released early last
year, was a relatively unspectac-
ular 25th anniversary look at Is-
rael; the present volume, how-
ever, magnificently revives (if
only briefly) the disappearing art
of photojournalism. Although
weak in places, when at its best
'73 in Pictures seems like a pap-
er-and-ink version of a museum
photo exhibit.
Befitting the Year of Water-
gate, Gjon Mili's coverage of the
Ervin commitee hearings definite-
ly tops the issue. Mili's exquis-
ite photographs of the parade
of witnesses carefully bring out
the individual personalities -
the tense but firm John Dean,
the polite but evasive H. R. Hal-
deman, and the "duty-bound" E.
Howard Hunt. Asoft, almost-im-
pressionistic portrait of M r s.
John Dean completes a memor-
able layout.
The besieged man at the top,
however, has anentiretsection
to himself. Dirck Halstead's shot
of Nixon standing before applaud-
ing returned POWs in his fam-
ous outstretched arms pose is
classic. Perhaps more interest-
ing, though, is Harry Benson's
study of Nixon taken during the
President's ill-fated late sum-
mer sojourn to New Orleans. Nix-
on's somber, distant expression
sums up all the harrowing events
of the past year.-'
In true Life tradition, feature
stories receive as much attention
as hard news. Henry Groskinsky
covers (or, if you prefer, uncov-
ers) a drive-in showing of Last
Tango in Paris in an interesting
time exposure. '73 in Pictures
has only two pages of sports ma-
terial, but Neil Leifer's photo of
a dazed Joe Frazier looking up at

victor George Foreman makes
up for the shortage.
The issue does have some glar-
ing weaknesses, however. Some
of the coverage priorities a r e
questionable - very little ap-
pears from the Mideast war, for
example, but several pages are
devoted to some ho-hum shots
from Skylab. In addition, much
of the space is filled with grainy,
over-enlarged, and over-used
wirephotos.

WAI3X Air Waves:
A Cream reunion?

Erica Jong is a ray of sun-
shine.
When I go to poetry readings,
I have the tiresome and sexist
stereotype that the reader will
be male, vague, and flecked with
tobacco.
So it was thoroughly refresh-
ing to listen to a poet (and novel-
ist) who is alert, funny, and a
feminist.
Jong, a New York City resident
and graduate of Barnard and Co-
lumbia, read from her volumes
of poetry, Fruits and Vegetables
and Half Lives, and from her
new novel Fear of Flying to a
pleased and responsive crowd in
MLB on Tuesday.
The first poem she read was
"Eggplant Epithalamium," a
wedding present for two friends
whose favorite shared activity is
cooking "the sexist fruit" to-
gether.
She next read what she calls
her "notorious" poem, "Seven-
teen Warnings in Search of a

Those Bob Dylan tour ticket
scalpers are having a hard time
unloading their tickets. It was
reported that at the Chicago con-
cert, scalpers took less than
face value for tickets in order
to get back any part of their in-
vestment. Apparently the warn-
ings about counterfeit tickets and
the well-publicized sellout, kept
the ticketless fans at home.
Leon Russell recently sat in
with Dave Mason to record a
new version of "The Lonely One"
a song from Mason's latest L. P.
It's Like You Never Left. The
new track may be issued as a
single.
Rumors of a Cream reunion
are apparently true. Although re-
cord industry spokesmen deny it,
reliable sources say the sixties
supergroup has already started
recording together. Reports
have been circulating recently
that Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker
and Jack Bruce would reunite in
the near future for an album and
a U. S. tour this summer.

"Bourgeois and Capitalist men-
tality. Beethoven's works have no
value because they do not repre-
sent the class struggle, most are
untitled and only service to dis-
seminate the filthy nature of the,
Bourgeoise,"

There is some textual matter in
'73 in Pictures, but it seems for
the most part either dull, or
more frequently, pompous ("We
expect too much of our years, as
if they were more somehow than
gatherings of days marked by
moon phases and journeys around
the sun," reads the flamboyant
opening). Basically, the pictures
carry the magazine - and, for
the most part, they do so quite
well.

341 S. Main St. Ann Arbor 769-5960

Feminist Poem," which is a
recital of reasons to "Beware of
the man . . ." Her listeners
cracked up at the admonition to
"Beware of the man who knows
what women are / His penis is
tiny and cannot spell."
Jong was motivated to write
her next recitation, "Paper
Cuts," while trapped in the fire
rectly to "the momentary panic,
the city paranoia" of being stuck
in an office.
I have been intimidated .
afraid . . . seen time killed .
the mail room women like lost
letters . . . I come to tell you
I have survived . . . will you
kiss my paper cuts?
staircase. The poem refers di-
Her next reading, "Mother,"
examined the intricate and con-
voluted love/hate feelings of
mother-daughter relationships.
Jong continued her reading
with "Prologue" from Half Lives

("It is easier to perfectly love
someone you have never met
than someone you share a bath-
room with"), and two as-yet-un-
published poems, "Becoming a
Nun" ("about your feelings when
you give up sex - you know the
next day you're in for a de-
bauch") and "The Penile Colony"
("with apologies to Kafka").
She concluded the poetry por-
tion of the reading with "To
Collette" ("I love her because
she was a survivor, a hardy
plant.") and two selections from
Yehuda Amakai's Songs of Jer-
usalem and Myself.
Jong rounded out the hour with
a synopsis of and reading from
her novel Fear of Flying. Her
heroine Isadora Wing bolts from
her husband at a psychoanalysts'
convention, and roams across
Europe with a rather ugly con
artist. The villian dumps h e r
in Paris, where for the first time
she is forced to encounter herself.
Isadore hauls her "albatross of
a suitcase'' to the 'top floor of a
sleazy Paris hotel, where she
discovers that she cannot cry
alone ("Maybe tears are a form
of communication.") "Phantom
cars of light" cross the ceiling of
her room as she realizes that she
would "stay with any man to
avoid being alone . . . Unless I
have a man, I have no identity."
In short: Erica Jong is a hel-
luva writer. Buy her books and
read them when you feel the need
for intimacy in noisy places.
--MARNIE HEYN

I

I

I1

EMA

TONIGHT-

I Ipresents:
-FEB. 5
7 p.m. only
KNEE"

ERIC ROHMER'S

at

1970

"CLAIRE'S

The air is thick with summer and leisure in the surreal story of a vacationing
diplomat who says he is interested only in women's minds but then has an "unde-
fined desire" to stroke a young girl's kr'ee. The 5th in the "Moral Tale" series
and an Ann Arbor favorite. Jean Claude Brialy, French subtitled.
and at 8:45-MICHIGAN PREMIERE 1972
CHLOE IN THE AFTERNOON
Chloe is the sixth in Rohmer's cycle. A comedy of very funny, complex contradic-
tions between action and word, between image and sound, Rohmer wrote and di-
rected this, the culminating opus in his series of moral tales (La Collectioneuse,
My Night at Maud's, Claire's Knee). Bernard Veney, Zouzou.

i

BEHIND THE
GREEN DOOR
DaUBLE FEATURE
CA MPUS GIR LS
PLUS
THE SEXUALIST

I

Auditorium A
Angel Hall
DIAL 668-6416
1214 S. UNIVERSITY
Sat., Sun., & Wed. Promptly
at 1, 3, 5, 7, & 9 p.m.
Thur. & Fri. at 7 & 9 only

admission
$2.00
(for both films)

"CHLOE"
selected to open the 1 0th
New York Film Festival

s

a,

231 S. STATE

N
01
w@

0 DIAL 662-6264

M'

Open 12:45--Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7:05, & 9:05 nm.
"POSSIBLY THE MOST SUBTLE AND
SOPHISTICATED HORROR FILM EVER
MADE!" -Stephen Farber, N.Y. Times
"A GOTHIC THRILLER THAT NEVER
LET'S UP! Has you wondering almost

S

Daily Photo by ROLFE TESSEM
Erica Jong
FIFTIH FINYII
210 S. FIFTH AVE., ANN ARBOR
761-9700
DID sACEIUN
VISIT EARTH IN
ANCIENT TIMES?
NOW WE t
HPAV E PROF! ".BASEDONTHE
CONTROVERSIAL
B00' THAT
SHATTERED
CONVENTIONAL
THEORIES OF
HISTORY AND
ARCHEOLOGY

I

throughout, what
what lurks, even,

lurks in the shadows-
in the sunshine."
-Decker, Ypsilanti Press

..

,

I

WJUEUEJ~ N: ~ 1' U U ~w&fI~I .

I

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