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February 06, 1974 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,1974

Hi,- AN LAELY

PQge Seven

1914 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven
_________________________________________________________________________ U

U

WANTS TO PLAY GUARD

split

wide to th

te leftJ Brt
c oBkrcott

Hawkeye timperioism.
a mat (Iyfasty forms
PE# L UUALYTUN1o Iowa City as a place here the
bigdelo Saturaynight is standing out in the field, watch-
ing tecrsak ree
Tis is a misconception of course. Iowa suffers just like
the rest of the country from the febrile sports-madness of the
'0s And since fe sane sports entrepreneurs would locate a
major league franchise within 10 miles of the place this hys-
teri has focused disproportionately upon Hawkeye athletics.
Iowa has never consistently fielded contenders in football
or basketball. Forest Evaheski had some great gi teams
grd lightly more then a decade ago, but even he couldn't keep
it going, and he finally left under fire Bump lliot,Ea
shevs's sucessor, has alead hired his ssecond football
cachl If tradition couns for anything in the traditionalist
Ce Bet, in aboutthe years Bump will be back o the
Unable to maintain a successful maor sports program.
the Hwkee have chosen to emphasize a usually-minor sport
with deep roots in the agrarian American Midwest - wrestling.
Iowa currently ranks either second o third nationally (depend-
ing o whether you liste to local partisans or the Amateur
Wetling News), and if Dn Hom had enoughknw to sht up
in his match against Mchigan's John Ryan, the Hakeyes
would nuetoably be o topa.
They'll get there soon enough. Iowa has decided to do evey-
ti gpor within itspoe to buy itself a lock-hold on the INCAA
wetling cshas hip_
Hakee mat mentor Gary Kurdelmeier has collected eight
-count 'em - eight assistant coaches, including the near-in-
vincible Dan Gable and -timeN CAA18-on champion Don
Sherman- Wrestling gets first call on the 13 tenders the Hawk-
eyes can hand outevr year for their entire mior sport pro-
gram. Motiprant'ly, urdelmeier has the support of the
local fan ndmda - something every coach needs to run a
championship prgram. Barring uatter disaster Iowa's going to
make it
Aparallel w th baseball
This will be trgc. The tack Iowa has used in its drive
for wrestig mran eflets inherent srctrlflaws
within the Aeian sportsscn which, although they may
sere the short-rint interests of some participants, under-
mine teln-u interests of everyon.
Buying championships is nothing new. 55 yeas ago, the New
York eeYaYk launched themselves to the top of the American
League by purchasing the Boston Red Sox' best plavers-includ-
ing such stalwarts s Home Rm Baker, Carl 'Mas, Babe Ruth
and Deacon Scott-from oner Harry Frazee, who was energet-
ically gigbnrupt o Broadway.
Doilars fuled the Yankee dynasty. When holes developed
in the stin e up, the :rn Bombers were able to pur-
chase such people a Tony Laie and Je DMaggio from
the Pacific Coast League, and to I theirnr league no sys-
tern AAAte~sIn Newark and Kansas City -
with the bs players mnycudbsy'
It prved to be disasters for baseball- The truly outstand-
in athltes- the people comobinng top physical skills and the
desire to do anything necessay to win - didt have that much
to: look ftwar to if they couldn't sig with New York. For
a hoe while, theyhokdp with other bsball clubs, maintaining
a genally high level of competition throughout the sport, but
as soon as other professional sot opened sot up, offering an al-
t~rative t the Yankees for thosewh wanted to be cham-
pious, the best athletes turned aay from the diamond.
To illustrate: 25 years ago, when such men as Jackie Robin-
son, aci Jensen, Tedl uszewki and Paul Giel had a shot at
eher bcall o football, they chose bsball. Since then, the
NFL has emerged as a league with just as much prestige as the
baseball major leagues. Now when peole like Mie Garrett and
Brad Vpan Pelt are confronted with choices beween baseball
adfootball, they almost invariably head for the gridiron
Down thea slippery slape
Justifiably or otherwise, professional football has been able
to sell itself to young athletes as a wide-open competitive free-
for-all where any lad born in a long cabin can grow up to quar-
terback the Spr Bow champion. Baseball, by contrast, retains
anaura of the era of gas lights, corner saloons, and Robber
Barons loading the dice. Baseball's image is a direct cone-
quneof the f ears during wichs the Yankees held the
vanial trump cards, bovgaht oumt the casino, and stacked the
deck in their on favor. Good athletes, to their credit, event-
uallyv decided yd prefer to play in an honest house.
Another innont armd t of the Yankee dynsty ws
thit n~ny mestablished fra"hiss were undermined. The oar-

test trism of the business holds that fans will support win-
ning teams more than they will back perpetual losers. With
weakened finances, the rebu3ilding iob is even more diffi-
cult and until it's done, the f-ns will continue to stay aw ay
..or to use elsewhere the money they'd normailly spend on
baseball.
Te moverofthe Gint"ad. oderstoCifrna - ?-haened
hlvafter the footbll Giantsput-togeter a charsmatic se
M kn on7ey but Horace Soe~ n atrOMleke
fuill l how th e trend-lines were going . . and got out of twns
ofteur wr estigi. h vn fad'atb tIw' rayn
S - l :. _. .° _ i JO LRt . 4 2>,ore l e am e fa tos: t at hi b se al w ud 'work 'th. to:

By JOHN KAHLER
Feimn pBrle% -,hos undobtWay tna
atr it beaneigh;rous to he
Miuhigad coache s ha no N .:e

a reluctant ballplayer. But that
is so.
"I rea ldin't want to play
frwaOrd," con fesses Britt. "I
doni't w.ani to be typned by, a- EtaI-ot.r m n y-
e_ ntn : re and a guad for

team
daily
sports
NIGHJ T EDITOR:)
JOHN K.HLER
w.hy I decided to enroll here,"
Britt explains. "I didn't w"ant to
go out of state. and if I staved
in the state I wanted to play-
Big Ten ball. I had considered
Iowa for a while-they needed a
quard-but that was out of the
question.
ande- me ihEne adLoc
oErnie : Johsn n oh oca
coaches were O.K.mand The fa;~i
:e w e -e n.IBtwhatrell
"Wolidd asfterhancerota
"Isasn too vdhiffivlt oestn
tpcs ereadhebutppnt tobu?

ef0fort
one of the fire. Actually-. Way-
man is a big 6-2. He jumps well
and is very strong. We knewv he
could handle himself well under
there."
to :ikalte time .that e'_i
ther," ote :t. Ihave7t
dongal te thr higswel
and s r enin ard erm, ai:
" do' to iToeagame ti-i
ig ht Iavneonoutpltooer
muon If oigagdainst.Te ota
has towwin, cnd 'gtoedowey
Akbogwdferen betwee n this
rearics team cand ak ears that'
Tes thsrear."in' ae e
prctce Bi'ryo as Lihtin
hardestes

Got a yearning for the "Good olf days"?
Let Rockin' 650 WRCN help!
7 a.m.-4 a.mn. doi.y
WRCN-' Where music from the
post is present. J
REQUEST LINE: 3-3535

r o t
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HAND MADE
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Non-Native Speakers of English
All Speakers of English asca econd Languacg& Are
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English Lcnguage Proficiency to be Given in RACK-j
HAM LECTURE HALL AT 7:00 P.M. ON THE 6th j
OF FEBRUARY. You Wi![ Receive $5.00for Approx-I
imotely 1I ,-2Hours of Your Time. If Interested
Yo-uMut Call and Register at the Following NumT-
ber: 76-416on o before February 6th.'
~No LI tudntsCurer~~y Eroled n te IteniveEnglish I

Professionalt League Standings

1tlantic Dini~nor
W L
1oS'; o3n 27 11
Per ladelphia l13S3
rlanra 2 ?3
C lelad , :19,4
Wte:rn Conference
Mfidwest Divi~fon
Chicago 44 i? Y 18
Dletroit 3^ 19
K.C-Orn aa'2136
Pacfi c DiSv ,on
ew York 16, Phoenix ?+?
Atlantra 121, Capital 163
I Milwaukee 1A2. Cleveland 8'

Phoenlix at cap ital
Chic.ago vs>. RC-Omaha3,at Omaha
Portlan d at Seattle
1NHL

Pct. GB
.5 5
.417 3
3223 23

Mountreal 3
N.Y. Rangers 25
Toroto
Buffalo 2
Det roit ?19
N.. Isanders 14
Vancouver 1
Phil1adelphia 31
Chicag~o 24
Los Angeleq 18
'Minnesota 13
Pit! sburgh 14
Calif-ornia 1+i

L T Pc-.
, 10 3-'
23 6 50~
=3 13 41
11 4 _ 62
3672

GF
211
1--
186
182
16-4
161
13?
11'
1h?
143
131
135
154
131
133

Ga
13?
1134
154
131
1'71
26
159
188
1"0
133
148
158
1S2
1F5
224

R. C. PLAYERS Present
THE DARK LADY
OF THE SONNETS
G. B. Show
THE SANDBOX
Edward A/bee

East Quad Auditorium
COME' ON DOWN . .

8 p.mr.
Admission $1

...............
-

SAILING PAS T a star'tle a;uki. tWvman Bri-t drives for an
ea'a C -"t±:nti s wopoints aontSuhr Ilri.Tog nly-,6-2. Briti's
a leaper, and for th i reaso hehsben pT 3layingorwrard, in-
stead of his favorite pcsitio, gua:rd.

Hiouston 116. Los Anzeles 112, overtime
Chicago 1(41, Boston 928
Proit at Portland, inc.
Seattle at GolIden State. inc.
Today's Games
Buiffalo at Philadelphia
Los Angeles at Atlanta
Boston at Milwaukee

Blue women cagers

Yesterday's Results
YA 1slandert 6. Minnesota 2
Montreal 3, St. Lours 3
Today's Games
Detroit at Toronto
Mon.rtreal at Minne-ota
\_ZY.0islnders at N.Y. PRanrs75
Buffalo6 at Los Angeles
vanIcouv9er at California
Atlanta at Chica_,o
41 $2.50

w F T+ s s T s w s : e s

see

on the air-LIVE!

wrW

fall

to

By LESLIE RIESTER
A scrappy M i c h tg a n team
battled Western Michigan Un:-
"ersitv to the end before s ''-
cumbing 5~-46 in women
kethail action .as ~
Led b:,' center Ann Platte's
points ano 16 re~o~"~ WMU
held off Wol'.'ertne rall.es .0 the
second and fourth qaarter~ to
oreser'e the ; tctor':
IN THE FIRST va r. an
overconf:dent Bronco team n'.aie
numerous mistake;, b u t the
tense Wolvertnes could only cap-
italize once and XX'estern lumped
to a lead it never gave on
Down 24-10 in the second quar~
ter. M:chigan manaaed to ~hake
WML' momentar A"w :th a zone
press. Wol"eriie center ~ner' I
Sza d'. ca :gh: f:re ano oun'v'e~.
s:x points as M:chigan nnrro~xed
the margin to :eo, 23~I~ a: h~
t.me.
Freshman L."d Soerv' c.~me
off the hench :n the secooc q~~o'-
ter after Sazdv collected her
fourth foul. HMd:nz her own
agatost the taller Brn~c team,
Se'.'ertn snared 14 ceo ~jnds and
added eigh' po nt~ as the Wo>
ver:nes refused o d.e
MICHiGAN USED a zone pres;
througho't most ot the gume, but
a well-disctoltned W.M~U team
quickly broke the ~re~ Yr e..~.
baskets.
The Broncos u~ed ti'~tr he.aht
advantage well, with &l center
Anne Platte cleaLog the boards
and starting an e;:ecti'.'e
break
Lydia Sims con::nued her fine
floor play. d:rectiog the Mach-
tgan attack and hound:ng WMU
.nto turnovers. S-ms ~gn.ted toe
Wolverines' fourth quarter ra.~.

Western
eQ aan,~oee~n
:rll:ed :: cut W.MU's lead bac~
DESPITE MICHIGAN'S ia>-
e:t~rt. the Wl;er~nes culd
eep Platte and Lode Plec
K t~e boards, and the Bronco
~ break f:oallv hur:ed \Lch-
S.m; acain led M:ch~g~n ;v::n
h oo:nt~ ;th:le ozad'~' chtpned in
12 coc 5e ertn S WMU s Anne
P.~:te t.ok gime honors wtth
17 oc:nts.

tea m
buy a bcet as L's rsity
Reseve on -l7 ShIcaeAm
five poits

Listen to the action on 650 AM in your dorm, and COME ON DOWN

341 S. MAIN ST.

ANN ARBOR

769-5960

EDUGElj- MSU WMU:
Skiers miaster slalom

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w

Jerusalem the Golden:

<- ace ohthiedmnscand wo-
K-del-h The enmweredgaid

out MISU for team honors by one
point. Ann Edwards took third
place, with Deb J. Lewis 'fourth
and Annette O'Malley seventh,
In ' Sunayspiant;.slalom vic:-
toy ihgnsGaryEEdwards
finished firs withPat uno and
Chris Fleming takin g seventh and
eihhplaces to compl-et.e thne
M.ichigan w-.as sec-ond as Deb. J.
Lewis finishedthird and Ann Ed-
gan~ women ere able to pick u
their faster tam time.

The historicl re''igious, and architec.urol:
canrce oftheeEteralc ty inthe traditions
daim, hritiaity an Isam

sigifi
of .Ju-

Jerusalem in the
Christian Tradition
PROFESSOR D. NOEL FREEDMAN

WED., FEB. 6
8 p.m.

Drecor o Proram n Stdiesin Re!'io
Modern Language Building-Lecture Room 2

____

FUTURE

WORLDS

ATTENTION
A rC rCD

LECTURE SERIES peet
DR. HUNTER S. THOMPSON
.O~rlC ~ A..r~c 'Far ad Lath g o

The Sacred Monu- TURF.1
ments of Jerusalem8pm
A __LLSTRATE- LTRE pm
PROFESSOR OLEG GRABAR
Angell Holl-Auditorium 8

i

GREATEST FORUM ON EARTH
TEACHING HISTORY:

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