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February 06, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Simon opposes Congressional
fuel price rollback proposal

DON'T MISS

THE ANNUAL

WASHINGTON (Al) - Federal
energy chief William Simon made
it clear to Senate-House confer-
ees yesterday that he opposes
their plan for a rollback in oil
prices.
But he declined to say whether
he would recommend a presiden-
tial veto of the emergency ener-
gy bill to which the rollback
amendment was added.
The bill must be approved by
both houses of Congress before
it goes to President Nixon.

MAKING AN unscheduled ap-
pearance to report on the status
of administration negotiations
with the striking truckers, Si-
mon told the conferees they had
approved a price level that would
make continued producrion un-
profitable for many oil compan-
ies.
"The cost of the product is at
a higher level than you rolled it
back to," he said.
Later, Simon told reporters he

Nixon proposes new
national health plan

AP Photo
PRESIDENT NIXON TELLS members of the American Hospital Association yesterday about his health
insurance plan which he will present to Congress. His plan will not call for an increase in federal
taxes, Nixon claips.
AVOIDING HASSLES:
LSA epoint deals
withaaeic proble ms

WASHINGTON OP) - President
Nixon said yesterday that his na-
tional health insurance proposal
would strengthen the present
health care system, not destroy
it.
It is one, he said, under which
"our entire health care system
would not be placed under t h e
heavy hand of the federal gov-
ernment."
Nixon gave a preview of his
program in a speech to the an-
nual convention of the American
Hospital Association.
The proposals are to be sent to
Congress today in a special mes-
sage. -
Under the Nixon proposals, a
three-part system would be in-
volved:
- A special employment plan
under which employer-employe
contributions would cover 'iealth
insurance premiums for employ-
ed persons, with the employer
paying the bulk.
-A government assistance plan
to cover people with low in-

comes and "those who can't pur-
chase health insurance at a rea-
sonable cost, such as those al-
ready in poor health or those
whose work entails risk."
The government would pay the
entire premiums for very low in-
come persons, but those with a
little more income would be ex-
pected to pay some share of the
cost.
THlE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 106
Wednesday, February 6, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Aun Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mall (Michigan and
Ohio): $12 non-local mall (other states
and foreign).
Summer session pubiisheo Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-I
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area) - $6.50 local mail (Michigan and,
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail ,other'
states and foreign).

considered the rollback amend-
ment "unworkable."
The amendment approved Mon-
day by the conferees would put
the price of all domestic crude
oil at $5.25 a barrel and prohibit
that price from rising above a
ceiling of $7.09 per barrel.
Simon told the conferees yes-
terday that he "could live with"
a price ceiling of $7.88 per bar-
rel.
SIMON WAS surprised to learn
that his meeting with the con-
ferees was open to the press
and almost disclosed the admin-
istration's negotiating position
with protesting truckers before
being warned that anything he
said would be reported.
Later in the day, President Nix-
on ordered an immediate freeze
in the retail price of diesel fuel
in an attempt to halt a strike
of independent truckers.
The prices are to be frozen un-
til the end of February or un-
til Congress passes remediad
legislation.
Simon also appeared before the
Senate Interior Committee to
support legislation to require
more information from oil pro-
ducers and distributors and other
energy suppliers.
THE ENERGY bill would give
the President authority to order
gasoline rationing and other man-
datory conservation measures.
The rollback amendment v s
designed to eliminate the need
for a controversial section limit
ing oil profits.
ARTISTIC
CREATIONS NEEDED
National Giftwore Manufacturer
will purchase new and unique
items or collections of items
from artists to be sold and pro-
moted in leading deportment
stores throughout the U. S. A.
Full credit to be given to artist.
Items must be of limited edi-
tions. Call art director, 9-1,
313 - 449 - 4448 for appoint-
ment, for review of art objects.
--F

KIWANIS SALE
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday
February 7, 8, & 9
KIWANIS ACTIVITY CENTER
CORNER W. WASHINGTON & FIRST ST.
Furniture, clothing, shoes, books, hardware, toys,
bicycles, white goods, and so forth
OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY 10 A.M.-8 P.M.
SATURDAY 10 A.M.-3 P.M.

By PAUL EICHBAUER
The literary college has insti-
tuted a series of phone lines to
help students get information
from the University.
The LSA checkpoint system lets
students use the telephone to tap
a centralized source of LSA aca-
demic information. ervices
available from Checkpoint are:
* 764-6810 (Point 10), personal
assistance from a Checkpoint
staff member;
* 764-6820 (Point 20), a tape
giving -advance classification and
closed course information;
* 764-6830 (Point 30), a tape
about mini-courses, "University
courses," and new courses;
0 764-6840 (Point 40), a tape
about academic special events;
and,
* 764-6850 (Point 50), a tape
that contains counseling informa-
tion and information to supple-
ment other Point numbers.
BOTH POINT 40 and 50 are up-

dated weekly.
Checkpoint is open from 10
a.m. to 10 p.m. on weekdays.
Any calls requiring personal as-
sistance that are received when
the line is busy or Checkpoint is
closed are defaulted to a ma-
chine which records the caller's
name, question and phone num-
ber. The Checkpoint staff then
returns the call later.
"The Checkpoint system is a
recognition of the college's re-
sponsibility to provide accurate,
up-to-date information to the stu-
dents, and it operates on the
premise that informed students
can make their own best decis-
ions about their academic pro-
grams," says Dave Rodgers,
head of the project.
THE SYSTEM offers informa-
tion on both academic procedures
and course descriptions, but
avoids any evaluation of either
courses or professors.
.Our system looks expensive at

first glance, but in reality it is
cheaper than the amount of mon-
ey spent on academic advertis-
ing in past years," says Rod-
gers.
The total expense for the equip-
ment and its installation was
about $4,000, with $1,800 neces-
sary for annual maintenance.
Funding for the project comes
totally from the Literary col-
lege.
THE .CHECKPOINT system
averaged 150-175 calls per day
during the fall term, and during!
the three day winter term regis-
tration period it handled 2,000
calls.
Checkpoint gives students a
place where their questions can
be answered, and by freeing
counselors from information-giv-
ing responsibilities gives them
more time to actually counsel
students, Rogers claims.
Departments are encourgaged
to describe the requiremuents for
majors and also new or interest-
ing courses, he says. These
coursetdescriptions are dispens-
ed both over the telephone and
through the semi-annual Check-
point newsletter.
"The course descriptions have
had a marked effect in enroll-
ment," says Rodgers, "and that

12

SANSUI 7

I' It I1 : i1 ir

stereo receiver

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
RWE E ~!mi r:Msyr ":"" ::~i: d:.::.r:rrm.;v.:rr:: . r g{r:-a}}:gigm };r,.};Cmp"}.:f:"}i:{r

" High - powered ( 1 60 --watts
IHF) amplifier is direct-cou-
pled for low-distortion, silky
smooth, crystal clear perdorm-
(4nce.
(Reg. $49900)

0 Ultrasensitive FM receiver
section (1.8 v IHF) with FET
front end, Igs in the IF and
six dual ceramic filters.
SALE $449

Wednesday, February 6
Day Calendar
Psychiatry: H. Shevrin, "Will This
Patient Be Assaultive? Predicting Vio-
lent Behavior from the Rorschach,"
CPH Aud., 10:15 am.
Ctr. Russian, E. Europen Studies: R.
Szporluk, "Russian. History & Soviet
Identity Today," Commons Rm., Lane
Hall, noon.
Comm. for Women: Regents Rm., Ad.
Bldg., noon.
Computing Ctr.: M. Baird, GM Tech
Ctr., "Scene Analysis &' Picture Recog-
nition by Computer," 120 P-A Bldg.,
noon.
Medieval, Renaissance Collegium: 2439
Mason Hall, 1 pm.
Religion, Ethics: S. Gordon, "My
Personal Experience of Buddhism,"
And. A, Angell Hall, 3 pm.
Indust. & Op. Engineering: J. Jarp,
Exxon Co., "Operations Research at Ex-
xon: Trends & Challenges," 229 W. En-

Botany: E. Stoermer, "Algal Popila-
tions in Lake Mich.--One Perspectives
on a Changing Ecosystem," 1139 Nat.
Sci., 4 pm.
Psych Film: "Summerhill;" "What's
New at School," Aud. 3, MLB, 4 pm.
Zoology: M. Chea,' "Sexual Behavior
in the Blue Gourami," Lec. Rm. 2,
MLB, 4 pm.
Women's Studies: "Women in the
Real World," women filmmakers' fest.,
Aud. E, 170 P-A Bldg., 7 pm.
Business Bch.. R. Agne, Stroh Brew-
ery, "Trauma of Label Change," slide
show, Sch. of Bus. Ad;, 8 pm.
"Music School: Univ. Symphony Or-
chestra, T. Alcantara, conductor, Hill
Aud., 8 pm.
Univ. Players: Brecht's "Edward II,"
Power Ctr., 8 pmn.
Baratin: French House, 613 Oxford
Rd., 8 pm.
General Notices

Adio No ~uic iiart

gin., 4 pm. Attention Students: Feb. 19, 5 pm.,
Statistics: M. Bock, U of Ill., "Pre- last date for Winter Term when Regis-
liminary Test Estimators," 1007 Angell trar's Ofc. will allow refund for a 50
Hall, 4 pm. per cent Withdrawal.
LOMA LINDA
EVERY WEDNESDAY
HAPPY HOUR TILL MIDNIGHT
TEQUILLA NIGHT
EVERY THURSDAY
MUSIC & DANCING.
featuring
TYand TOM
4 DAYS A WEEK
Wednesday and Thursday-8-12
Friday and Saturday-9-1
Located at the intersection of Broadway,
Pontiac Trail, and Plymouth Rd.

is the ultimate test of an in- |
formation-giving service, to con- 336 SOUTH STATE 769-4980
tinually make a difference."
CITIZEN KANE at 6:30 and 10:30
The film that has consistently topped the "Best Ten" movies of all time.
The story of a newspaper magnate, Charles Cane, who gains the world and
loses his "Rosebud." It is said to be about William Randolph Hearst, but
t is really about Orson Welles and his filrm techniques. With Joseph Cotton
as "Jed" and Agnes Mooreheod.
VARIETY at 8:30
This 1925 fim about the circus and a trapeze artist whose wife betrays
him is remarkable for Emil Jennings' fine acting in the lead role. A German
silent by E.I. Dupont.
TONIGHT ARCHITECTURE
Cinema Guild $1 per film AUD.

4

u

.a

WOMEN IN THE REEL WORLD
Free Film Festival
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Wed., Feb. 6-Sun., Feb. 10
Physics & Astronomy Building

WED. FROM 3 P.M.

THURS. FROM 1 P.M.

FRI.-SUN. FROM 12 NOON

Featuring In Person: MARJORIE ROSEN
author of POPCORN VENUS: Women, Movies, and the American Dream, Sheila
Paige, filmmaker, of N.Y.'s WOMEN MAKE MOVIES, and representatives of many
midwestern film groups.
FILMS BY WOMEN DIRECTORS 1922-1974

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7
1:00 FILMS AND WORKSHOPS, to be announced
3:00 CLEO FROM 5-7, Aques Varda France 1962
L.^ ACrCTICC n,%r.-i-UC -ACTC0~rKlnn/~K I A- r%....... -I ,I CA:

I

! II

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