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February 02, 1974 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, February Z, 1974

THE MICHIGAM DAiLY Saturday, February 2, 1974
$88 BILLION: ~

r., .:..., ..

1 '

$88 BILLION: :1:: ,=.- ..
DAILY OFFICIAL
Defense budget up BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 1)
and that unemployment also would
be down.
THE SENATE Appropriations
Committee is expected to set a
target ceiling on spending for the
Defense Department and other
government agencies as part of
the annual congressional scrutiny
of the administration's budget.
Congressional sources said re-
newed attempts will probably be
made to cut defense spending and
foreign aid, with possible efforts
to shift some of the funds into
education, health and transporta-
tion.
The defense budget usually pro-
vokes the sharpest congressional
disputes.
LAST YEAR, Congress cut 3.535
billion dollars from the adminis-

AL

i

tration's appropriations bill, in ap-
proving 73.715 billion dollars in
new defense funds for fiscal 1974.
Also, along these lines, the Nixon
administration plans to ask Con-
gress for nearly 30 million dollars
for a build-up of U. S. Naval facili-
ties on the island of Diego Garcia
in the Indian Ocean, Rep. Lee
Hamilton (D-Ind.) said yesterday.
Hamilton, Chairman of t h e
House Foreign Affairs subcom-
mittee on the Near East and South
Asia, expressed concern that the
administration - in seeking the
expansion - appeared to be em-
barking on a major new policy in
the Indian ocean area.
Hamilton said he plans to hold
hearings soon to get from the
administration a full explanation
on the need to increase U. S. base
facilities on the British-owned is-
land.

Saturday, February 2

Day Calendar
Gymnastics: Michigan, Illinois, Indi-
ana, Crisler Arena, 1 pm.
Dance: "New Concepts in Theatre,"
Barbour Gym, 8 pm.
Musical Society: Carlos Barbosa-Lima,
guitarist, Rackham Aud., 8:30 pm.
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SAB, 764-7456
Recruiting on Campus: Feb. 5: Abra-
ham & Ctraus & IRS; Feb. 7: Henry
Ford Hospital; Feb. 11: Elect. Data
Systems Corp.; Feb. 12: Elect. Data
1 Systems Corp., Conn Mutual Life Ins;
Feb. 13: Office of Mgt. & Budget, S. S.
Kresge Co.; Feb. 14: Cincinnati Mila-
cron, Dept. of Commerce/Bureau of
Census, NCR & Henry Ford Hospital;
Feb. 15: Sears Roebuck & Co., U. S.
Atomic Energy Comm.
Summer Placement
3200 SAB, 764-4117
Announcement: Yale Univ., CT. Sum-
mer Research Program for Juniors in
physics, chemistry, electronics, work
involving air pollution, energy, com-
puter, etc. Details-appls. available.
Circus Kirk, East Berlin, PA. A sum-
mer experience you will never forget;
Join the circus, be a clown, animal
trainer, rigger, ress agent many other
opportunities. Detais-appls. avail.
Interviews: register by phone or in
person. Abraham & Straus, NY. Will
interview Mon., Tues., Feb. 4, 5, from
9 to 5. Must have completed Junior
year and interested In retail career.
Camp Maplehurst, MI., Coed. Will
interview Thurs. Feb. 7, 1:30 to 5. All
camp openings avail.
Falling Creek Camp for Boys, NC.
Will interview here Thurs., Feb. 7, 9 to
4. Openings includes skills in riding,
swimming, crafts, judo, archery, riflery,
many others. Age 19 and up.
Camp Tamarack, MI., Coed, Fresh
Air Society Detroit. Will interview
Fri., Feb. 8, 9 am. to 1 pm. All camp
positions open.
Camp Ramapo Anchorage, N.Y., Coed.
Emotionally Disturbed. Will interview
Fri., Feb. 8, 9:30 to 11:00. All camp
positions open; college credit given. k

Dylan show still on

Sees continued shortage
John Sawhill, deputy administrator of the Federal Energy Office,
tells reporters assembled in Washington yesterday that the nation'
will continue to suffer shortages of fuel oils and possibly gasoline
for two or three years even if the Arab oil embargo is lifted, be-
cause of insufficient refinery capacity.
Cooperative food buying
b e at reBtai 'epofs

(Continued from Page 1)
conspiracy or not. It's crummy
that the ticket orders got filled so'
poorly, it's crummy that people
are ripping other people off."
YOUNG SAID that no specific
course of action had been deter-
mined, but that she would never
again allow an off campus organi-
zation to handle ticket distribution.
"We will never again allow
tickets or ticket handling out of our
hands," she said. "We try to run a
tight operation and we take respon-
sibility for anything that is run by
us. Never again will we let the
tickets out of our hands like that."
The official University reaction
was one of concern. Vice Presi-
dent for Student Affairs Henry
Johnson authorized a complete in-
vestigation of any wrong-doing in-
volving the University.

THOMAS EASTHOPE, assistant
vice president for Student Services
and in charge of the invesdgation
said, "There is evidence that
makes certain conditions of the
contract suspicious. Our primary
concern is for the students. The
vice president's office will co-oper-
ate in any way in attempting to
right any wrongs that have been
perpetrated."
Easthope also expressed concern
about the distribution of tickets.
"If we ask our students to line up
and pay for tickets, then we ought
to be able to control the distribu-
tion of those tickets. If there's any
way we lose control of the distribu-
tion next time, then maybe we
shouldn't bother with the hassle of
having a concert."
"We should learn from this. It's
a sorry lesson to learn when the
stakes are as high as they are."

IC

(Continued from Page 1)
tribute energy; that's still letting
you off the price hook.
A summary of the co-op's food
list includes: grains, seeds, flours,
beans, peas, breads, oils, dried
f r u i t s, nuts, pasta (spaghetti,
noodles), sweets (honey, molasses),
seasonings, herbs butters, cheeses,
yogurt, eggs, and miscellaneous
stems such as granola and sea salt.
If that doesn't make your mouth
water like a butcher's dog at
carvin' time, nothing will. And al-
though cook books don't taste to
good, there are a lot of them avail-
able, like Recipes For a Small
Planet and the New York Times
Natural Foods Cook Book.
MORE PEOPLE are buying the
good things at the Ann Arbor Peo-
ple's Food Co-op, and more peo-
ple-support means more dollar-
sales. With more capital at hand,
concerns such - as a cooperative
bakery can be started.

A lease for the mill was just
signed, and ovens are being test-
ed. It looks like commercial bread
prices will soar now that the U.S.
is importing wheat from Canada
at $6.06 per bushel. So, a co-opv
bakery is a step in the right direc-
tion'to keep consumer costs down.
Another food co-op on Minor
Street is on the drawing boards to
help meet the community's grow-
ing need for cooperative food.
PEOPLE WITH energy and ideas
at the People's Food Co-op are al-1
ways in demand. People-power is
what makes it go. Volunteer work-
ers, people with trucks who can go
to Detroit and other destinations,
donations, loans, egg cartons, jars,
and bags are all needed to help
the co-op carry on.
Tomorrow at the Primo Show-
bar, 217 S. Ashley, at 8:30, there
will be a benefit for the, Ann Arbor
People's Food Co-op. Rabbits and
the Sojourner Wolf Cat's House
Band will be playing, and there
will be a $1.00 donation per oersnn.
Tomorrow, we'll, take a gander
at the Ann Arbor People's Produce
Co-op and others.
DYLAN and only Dylan!
SATURDAY 9 A.M.-6 P.M.

A

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with give-away of
"Bob Dylan's Greatest
Hits" Album
every hour
SPECIAL DOCUMENTARY
ON 'BOB DYLAN AT NOON
WCBN-FM 89.5

If

I.

____ i

I

TONIGHT
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
PLAY-OF-THE-MONTH
CLARE LUCE'S
THE WOMEN
at the
AACT WORKSHOP BLDG.
201 MULHOLLAND
8 P.M.
662-9405
THIS WEEKEND
$2.50 8:30

Students, Faculty, and Staff
Nomination forms for DISTINGUISHED
TEACHING ASSISTANT AWARDS are
available in Room 1020, Rackham Building.
The deadline for submission of forms is
FEBRUARY 4, 1974

Mondayat 8:00 p.m. Our Common Council will vote
upon a proposed MCDonald's Restaurant in the new
Maynard Street area. We urge the Council to reject
this proposal as being inimical to the spirit of our com-
munity for
f Whereas the historic League House across from Lane Hall was destroyed,
giving way to Gino's, Inc.
* Whereas the proposed McDonald's, Inc., is upon the now-standing Hall
House beside Nickels Arcade and
9 Whereas Burger King will soon be building a two-storied structure at the

!!1

II

ALSO

end of Maynard Street

III

it

NOMINATION FORMS FOR

#f.----

V ".r V

i

FRI.-SAT.-SUN.
Rounder Record's
NORMAN
BLAKE

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARDS
FOR JUNIOR FACULTY
Are Available in Room 1020, Rackham Building.
THE DEADLINE for Submission of Forms'ls
MARCH 18, 1974
it nomination forms in quadruplet to:

" Therefore, an affirmative vote would allow the existence of three out-of-
state based food chains within 1 2 blocks of each other in the traditional
State Street area. This intensive and needless concentration would result in
increased traffic snarls, excessive litter, and in general do detriment to the

I sophisticated yet fragile spirit that has distinguished
I I eas

Ann Arbor for

150

Subm

FTPRFiS YAID IVIC PlFDIfF CA l I YAIR COUNCIl MAN

_ RI

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I

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