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February 02, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

BRITISH MINERS VOTE

Coal strike
LONDON (UPI) - Britain's ~ (TUC) agreedt
269,000 coal miners completed a Minister Edward
crucial strike ballot yesterday. peace talks.
Although final results will not be THEY SAID ti
announced until tomorrow or only on an "exj
Monday, their leaders said there without any str
was an overwhelming majority cepting any n
in favor . of a national mines peace plan.
shutdown Feb. 10. But Lawrence
As balloting in the coalfields secretary of th
ended, heads of the 10 million- union, said he hi
member Trades Union Congress tend the talks.

predicted
to meet Prime "My union will take part in
Heath for new further talks unless the pri
minister can promise furtl
hey would do so cash at the end of them,"
ploratory" basis said.
ings about ac-

no
ime
her
he

KATHERINE HEPBURN WEEKEND
BILL OF DIVORCEMENT
Johny Barrymore plays a shell-shocked father who escapes from an asylum
to find his old home completely changed. Katherine Hepburn has a hand in
the alterations. George Cukor directs this 1932 drama.
SUN.: SYLVIA SCARLETT
TUES.: CITIZEN KANE
..TON ITE Architecture Aud.
7 and 9:05 Adm. $1

ew government
Daly, general
he mineworkers
mself will not at-

Soviet police close
underground press

1
I
i.
i
i
r
I.
3

MOSCOW (AP) - Lithuanian se-
cret police have mounted a mas-
sive search of homes, offices and
churches to ferret out dissidents
responsible for illegal publica-
tions and protest actions in So-
viet Lithuania, an underground
journal reports.
The police dragnet was de-
scribed in the seventh and eighth
issues of the "Chronicle of the
Lithuanian Catholic Church"
which were made available to
western reporters in Moscow this
week.
The Chronicle reveals increas-
ing unity between nationalist and
religious activists in the Baltic
republic. Both groups regard So-
viet authorities as the source of
their problems.
THE LATEST ISSUES of the
Chronicle, which survived a na-
tionwide, two - year crackdown
on dissent by the secret police,
detail numerouscasesofdalleged
religious repression and civil
rights violations. The illegal
journal indicated that dissidents
have channeled general discon-
teht in Lithuania, manifested in
the bloody riots of 1972, into a
loose organization of under-
ground centers throughout the
republic.
The reports tell of widespread
distribution of the Chronicle,
clandestine printing of prayer
books, secret construction of
printing presses and large scale

collective protests to authorities.
DISSIDENTS IN M o s c o w
claim the secret police headquar-
ters has sent at least two spe-
cialists to direct a crackdown on
such Lithuanian activities.
One dissident cell in the Lith-
uanian capital of Vilnius, the
Chronicle reported, lost its il-
licit homemade printing press
when police agents searched a
private home.j
Publishing in the Soviet Union
is strictly controlled by the state
and printing houses must submit
a sample of every item - from
subway tickets to novels - to
the censors before turning out
more than one copy.
LITHUANIANS have complain-
ed for years about Soviet sup-
pression of the Roman Catholic
church which claims some 3 1
million adherents there.
Chronicle No. 7 reported that
last year a total of 31,944 Lithu-
anians protested in three peti-
tions to the Soviet authorities
over religious repression and dis-
crimination in secular life. One
petition was signed by 16,800
persons, it said.
DISAFFECTION in Lithulania
was candidly reported last month
in the republic's Communist par-
ty press which cited nationalism,
religion and individualism among
the party's chief concerns.

THE MINEWORKERS t o o k
this uncompromising stand des-
pite an appeal by Heath for "ra-
tional discussion" instead of
"brute force."
As miners' balloting ended,
one South Wales union official
predicted a 95 per cent "yes"
vote in his area for a strike.
As soon as voting ended,
union officials sealed ballot
boxes and had them taken by
train or automobile to mine-
workers union headquarters in
London for counting by the in-
dependent Electoral Reform So-
ciety.
UNION OFFICIALS said the
final results will be announced
tomorrow night or Monday.
The union has served notice
that if there is a majority of
more than 55 per cent for a
strike, the shutdown will start at
midnight Feb. 10.
Heath has invited the TUC and
the Confederation of British In-
dustry, which represents 12,000
industrial firms, to immediate
peace talks to see if there is not
a way out of the crisis.
T H E CONFEDERATION'S
council called a meeting Mon-
day to decide on a reply to
Heath.
Heath's aim remained, despite
the tough stance of the mine-
workers leaders and the expect-
ed overwhelming strike vote, to
get them back tothe bargaining
table before they plunge the
country into a national mines
shutdown which he said woud
spell disaster for it's industry.
DIAL 668-6416
1214 S. UNIVERSITY
Sat., Sun., & Wed. Promptly
at 1, 3, 5, 7, &9 p.m.
Mon. & Tues. at 7 & 9 only

Near miss
James Welsh, of Marietta, Pa., peers through the hole left in the
windshield of his truck, after a rock was dropped from an over-
pass near Brownstown, Pa: on Rt. 222. The act was one of several
acts of violence associated with a nationwide independent truck-
ers strike.
Violen t acts mar

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"Oeo*h
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t Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y YY YY Y Y YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY'.

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NEW WORLD CINEMA presents
AN CAPOTE'S

CHILLING..
rivals The EXORCIST

truckers'
By United Press International
Sporadic reports of gunblasts
and bottle - throwing aimed at
truck drivers were reported in
Michigan yesterday but the main
thrust of a strike by indepen-
dent truckers appeared to be
centered in other parts of the
nation.
While auto industry sources
said as many as 75,000 workers
could be idled in Ohio as a re-
sult of the strike, spokespersons
for the "Big Three" automakers
in Detroit said no production cut-
backs were being considered at
this time.
"It's a little too early to tell
what effect the strike by inde-
pendent truckers will have on
us," a spokesperson for Ford
Motor Co. said. "Our main con-
cern is long-haul trucking and
we're looking very carefully at
that aspect and studying alter-
native forms of transportation."
STATE POLICE reported inci-
dents of bottles, stones and bul-
lets aimed at truckers on ma-
jor freeways in the state but
said no serious injuries or tie-
ups resulted from the disturb-
ances.
Heavy - duty nails were found
scattered outside truck depots
and freeway exits in Ionia and
Holland and several truck driv-
ers told police they had been
shot at on Western Michigan
freeways.
On the Indiana Toll Road just
over the Michigan border, police
said at least six trucks were
barred with bottles and gunfire
early yesterday. One driver was
hospitalized after he lost control
of his rig when two bottles were
fired through his windshield.
A SPOKESPERSON for the
supermarket industry in Michi-
gan said supplies were flowing

protest'
into the state at "an abnormal
rate" because truck drivers were
steering clear of the Pennsylva-
nia - Ohio Turnpike, a major
trucking route to Michigan.
"In eastern Ohio and Pennsyl-
vania, drivers have been warned
not to leave the state and har-
rassed at gunpoint," the spokes-
person said. "Our suppliers are
telling us that they can't get
carriers to bring the goods out
from the East because they
don't want to gamble on the
Pennsylvania - Ohio Turnpike."
"As long as there's this threat
of constant harrassment, car-
riers are, going to avoid mov-
ing towards Michigan. And we're
telling our truckers just to turn
around and come home if they
run intoany trouble."
THE SUPERMARKET sookes-
person said, however, no serious
shortages of foodstuffs in Michi-
gan markets would result "unless
the strike is stretched out for
a long time."
The strike over rising diesel
feel prices first took firm hold
in Ohio and Pennsylvania, where
National Guard have been called
out to patrol the highways, and
spread by yesterday morning to
at least ten otherdstates.
THIiIMCHGAN PAIL.Y
Volume LXXXIV, Number 102
Saturday, February 2, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio): $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session publishea Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area)- $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio :$7.00 non-loalmail;other
states and foreign).

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Last Night TONIGHT
Charles Chaplin as

Monday, Feb. 4
7 & 9:30 P.M.
Oodern Languages
MdAud. 3
e finest pictures of the year and possibly of the decade"-Saturday Review
"Excellent. Sends shivers down the spine."-New York Times

I

STREI AD
THE WAY WE WERE
COLUMBIA PICTURES and RASTAR PRODUCTIONS Prea
A RAY STARK-SYDNEY POLLACK Prodacio" PG'

MING-
Wed./Thur.
NAT. SCI. AUD.

Cries and Whispers

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APPEARING AT KING PLEASURE
SUNDAY, F EBRUARY 3

I

The Great Dictator

FIFTIH -F[NME
210 S. FIFTH AVE., ANN ARBOR
761-9700
DID SPCEEN
VISIT EARTH IN
ANCIENT TINES? ET
NOW WEj
HVE PROOF!1 BASED ON THE

-and-

$399
AND ON SALE AT
Ask 0 .
ISA,,h~ u u n t \. ,rt1 Sir*
i6 a.

Kurt Vonnegut's

Cannes Prize Winner

Slaughterhouse Five
Chaplin in his greatest role, Vonnegut's novel as a
Cannes Prizewinning film. Together this weekend in

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