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February 01, 1974 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

Jllington 's music: Personality

By BOB SCHETTER

i
1

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI

Duke Ellington

Kate Hepburn Weekend
'Cinema Guild, Arch. Aud.
Fri., 7, 9
Philadelphia Story (1940), di-
rected by Hollywood veteran
George Cukor, is one of the fun-
niest and best-loved of all the
Hepburn comedies. Adapted for
the screen by the brilliant Don-
ald Ogden Stuart, it was taken
from the hit Broadway play by
Phillip Barry and also stars Cary
Grant, James Stewart, Ruth Hus-
sey and Roland Young. Hepburn

mer musician and shell-shocked
father who escapes from a men-
tal institution to the home he
left behind before the war. Di-
vorcement is the story of his
wife, who rejects him for an-
other man, and his daughter,
who loves him dearly. It also
features Billie Burke, David
Manners and Henry Stephenson.
Though rather short on running
time and plot development (Bar-
rymore somehow regains his
great musical gift for compos-

first-rate and extremely eccen-
tric tale of a girl who disguises
herself as a boy to help out her
beloved father, a con man and
a thief. Men as well as women
fall in love with her; Hepburn
spends most of the screen time
dressed in drag and it's hilarious-
ly effective. Directed by George
Cukor (his first flop), Scarlett
also features Cary Grant, Brian
Aherne, Edmund Gwenn and
Dennis Moore.
-MICHAEL WILSON

Those who came to see Duke
Ellington Wednesday at Power
Center expecting an evening of
good jazz were in for a surprise.
Ellington's music was not top
quality but nevertheless made
for an enjoyable evening.
After all, Ellington's music was
only a means of reaching the
inner workings of a truly spirit-
ed personality.
Ellington came onstage after
a rather shoddy warm-up num-
ber by his band. Ellington, too,
seemed not in the swing of
things as he stumbled through a
couple of lesser-known tunes be-
fore both he and the band woke
up with "Take the 'A' Train."
The most unusual aspects of
the performance were comedy
bits and high jinks integrated
into the musical framework. A
"drunk" musician would mean-
der up to the microphone, dis-
play discreetly located holes in
and an especially interesting one
to watch for a unique reason -
a great deal of it, funny when
produced just before World War
11, is almost macrabre now.
-DAVID BLOMQUIST
H* A*S*II
UAC-Mediatries, Nat. Sci. Audi-
torium. Fri., Sat., 7, 9:30
M*A*S*H, as one of the first
service comedies to realistically
portray the results of the war
while at the same time hilarious-
ly laying bare the absurdities of
the military, was one of the first
anti-war war comedies.
Hindered only by a week
script, director Robert Altman
(McCabe and Mrs. Miller) has
fashioned a clever and often hi-
larious film, documenting the ef-
forts of the doctors of the 4077th
Mobile Army Surgical Hospital
to retain their sanity in the face
of the Korean War and the U. S.
Army. Some of the scenes
achieve the status of classic com-
edy: tho -st Supper of the Pain-
less P Hawkeye and Trap-
per Jo 'rip to Tokyo, and the
funniest football game ever film-
ed. The excellent cast includes
Eliot Gould, Donald Sutherland,
Sally Kellerman, and Gary
Burghoff (TV's Radar O'Reilly).
-JAMES HYNES
The Deadly Trackers
State
Starring Richard Harris and
Rod Taylor, Trackers is the story
of a town sheriff whose wife and
child are brutally murdered by
a gang of bloodthirsty cutthroats
that would kill for a decent meal.

his pants to the audience, stagger
about, and then disappear again
into the orchestra to be heard
plucking a violin at inopportune
moments.
Or a solo musician would hold
a note on his instrument while
Ellington casually sipped a Coke
and told the musician to "Hold
it!" Indeed there was even a
Louis Armstrong impersonation,
complete with rolled eyes and
held white handkerchief.
And then there were Elling-
ton's introductions in which his
warmth prevailed. In these spots
he gave humorous accounts of
his travels, rolled off his catch
phrase "Love you madly" in the
language of each country he had
visited, introduced himself as
"that young apprentice piano
player" (He's 75), dedicated
songs to the most beautiful wo-
man in the audience "and I know
that he knows that we know who
that person it," and so on.
Harris plays the embittered,
revenge-bent family man who
trails the killers far into Mexico,
killing each one by one; Taylor
is the leader of the vicious mur-
derers and does little more than
support the theory that he hasn't
made a good film since Time
Machine. If you like action, ex-
citement and gutless thrills, stay
the hell away from Deadly
Trackers.
-MICHAEL WILSON
Also..."
Another week of The Way We
Were at Campus, Sleeper at
Michigan, Chariot of the Gods at
Fifth Forum and Papillon at Fox
Village. Cinema IItpresents Roh-
mer' s Chloe in the Afternoon
Fri., Sat., Sun. at 7, 9 in Aud. A;
Couzens Film Co-optshows Afri-
rican Queen Fri., Sat. at 8, 10 in
Couzens Cafeteria; New World
Media Int'l Films presents Revo-
lution Until Victory: 126 Fri., at
8 in E. Q.; BursleyeEnterprises
features A Warm December Sat.
at 9 in Bursley W. Cafeteria.
Tonight and Saturday
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
PLAY-OF-THE-MONTH
CLARE LUCE'S
THE WOMEN
at the
AACT WORKSHOP BLDG.
201 MULHOLLAND
8 P.M.
662-9405

In short, he presented an aura
of goodwill to the audience and
invited them to share in his own
enjoyment of the performance.
The second set was particularly
good as Ellington presented songs
composed for his African tour
including "Satin. Doll" and other
standards. Improvisations and
ensemble playing seemed much
more energetic here. Solos by
Arnold Ashberry on tenor saxo-
phone, Marty Johnson on trum-
pet, and Russell Procope on clar-
inet and alto saxophone were
particularly outstanding.
To end the evening, it was El-
lington again, playing two up-
beat encores with his band and a
very beautiful piano solo. So rich
and controlled was this final
number that it highlighted the
concert and immediately brought
the crowd to its feet in apprecia-
tion.
In a short interview backstage,
Ellington came across more ac-
rimoniously than onstage. He
displayed an intense dislike for
"typical" questions and a deep
involvement with life and the
present. No longer did he want
to stand accountable for his past
fame. Instead, he chose to tell
of his Russian tour for the U. S.
State Dept., and of all things,

ing music is his way of helping
people, and it is something he
does constantly, no matter what
kind of audience.
"I'm not on tour," said Elling-
ton. "This is something that I do
52 weeks per year."
But along with his belief in
music as an aid to the beauty in
people, he also notes the dark
side of human conduct. Briefly
he told of friction he caused in
the White House by mentioning
freedoms all people should have.

Fin lly when informed that
pl ots will respond to music of
their owners, he refused to be-
lieve it. "Why should plants
trust humans?" he asked. "Noth-
ing is more fickle or violent than
man."
Truly a remarkable man. His
essence is captured in the com-
ment of one fan:
"I've listened to him for years.
I just like his music. (with a
smile) And he can still play them
can't he!?"

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS Present
te secon
WED.,;Feb.+6-SAT., Feb. 9
8 P.M.-THE POWER CENTER
Tickets available at U Plavers Ticket Office, Mendelssohn Theatre
Lobby Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 2 p.m.-5 p.m.
Power Center Box Office opens 6 p,m. performance days
ADVANCE INFORMATION: 764-6300

the affect of music on plants. "One needs freedom from
Ellington seemed annoyed that fvar." he said. "Secondly, we
the State Dept. sent him on a need not be afraid that the next
political "goodwill" tour rather guy will come out better than
than~ as a simple musician. Play- you."

Fr

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shines as the rich, misunder-
stood "golden girl" in love with
three men and unable to choose
a husband. Grant plays beautiful-
ly her first husband, a man
who would rather playgolf than
house, The ending will surprise
you, and the picture is solid en-
tertainment from start to finish.
r Sat, 7, 9
A Bill of Divorcement (1932),
also directed flawlessly by Cu-
kor, was Hepburn's screen de-
but, but you'd never know it.
John Barrymore stars as a for-

ing to insure a happy and Hol-
lywood ending in only 80 min-
utes), Divorcement is still an en-
chanting Hepburn vehicle that
will doubtlessly remain ageless,
as she has, for another fifty
years.
Sun., 7, 9
Sylvia Scarlett (1935) will sim-
ply astound you with its abun-
dance of mistaken and ambigu-
ous sexuality. Although a com-
inercial flop at the time of re-
lease, Scarlett emerges as a

50c

Slaughterhouse 5 and
The Great Dictator
Slaughterhouse 5
and The Great Dictator
Friends of Newsreel, MLB, Aud.
3,4. Fri., Sat., 7:30 & 9:30
Slaughterhouse 5 is a nice film
adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut,
Jr.'s novel (co-produced, for the
record, by George Roy Hill, the
fellow responsible for the recent
The Sting), but it is hardly the
number one item on Newsreel's
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The Great Dictator is one of
the later Charles Chaplin films,

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Ronstadt deserves
more recognition

By DIANE LEVICK
Hopefully you weren't turned
off to Linda Ronstadt when you
heard her croon ex-Monkee Mi-
chael Nesmith's less-than-poetic
"Different Drum." 'Cause she's
back to prove she's got better
taste on a "best of" album by
the same name.
Different Drum (Capitol ST-
11269) includes Nesmith's metric-
ally awkward paean to female
independence plus his fun "Some
of Shelly's Blues," a swinging
country blues.
Ronstadt delivers the works of
Dylan, Tim Buckley, and Jack-
son Browne with usually pleas-
ing, forceful - but sometimes
-forced vocals. Her cultivation
of a slight natural vibrato occa-
sionally gets in the way of her
easy, gliding style.
Ronstadt's emotional control
over her voice is tight; she gives
Dylan's "I'll Be Your Baby To-
night" all the suggestiveness its
author could never communicate
himself.
Along with Browne's "Rock
Me on the Water," Gary White's
"Long Long Time" is one of
Ronstadt's most melodically
memorable selections. It's the
story about the worst kind of
hurt: pain for a relationship
A
THIS WEEKEND
$2.50 8:30
FRI-SAT.-SUN.
Rouncder Record's
NORMAN
BLAKE

that never was. Yet just when
you want to cry along with Linda
for an emotional catharsis, the
weepy strings intrude, and you
feel as drippy as you did upon
exiting from Love Story.
On "Will You Love Me To-
morrow" Ronstadt takes the
back seat again while the instru-
mentation buries her and an
atrocious female chorus puts in
its two cents.
Different Drum presents a
singer who deserves more than
her short-lived Top-40 fame. Be-
sides, the material included
couldsstand on its own merits.

{ KATHERINE HEPBURN WEEKEND
THE PHILADELPHIA STORY
George Cukor's 1940 look at "The Privileged Class Enjoying Its Privi-
leges," is one of the funniest films ever made. A high-society Katherine
Hepburn throws out her husband Cory Grant and reporter Jimmy Stewart
comes in to investigate. The scene where Hepburn gets drunk is classic.
A triple-crown winner in comedy.
SAT.: BILL OF DIVORCEMENT
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
CINEMA GUILD Tonight at Adm$1
7 and 9:05

2nd
LAUG
WEEK

"TERRIFIC"
HNAB E--Canby, N.Y. Times
"Allen's Masterpiece"
-News 'v
WOODY ALLEN
TAKES A
NOSTALGIC LOOK
AT THE
FUTURE.
OPEN 1 2:45 "
SHOWS AT
,3,5,7,9P.M.
'Wgody 'Diage
cAlleq ''Iaton
"1ee peC"
603,E. LIBERTY 0 DIAL 665-6290
. a

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