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January 31, 1974 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-31

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THE MIC * IG N "C)AILY

Page Seven

THE MICHIGAN ~A1LY ~'age Seven
'I'

-Et

Lrappler

uZenga

astounds all

ii

Noon Luncheon
Home made soup and sandwich-.40c
Friday, February 1 st

By CLARKE COGSDILL
R Rob H u i z e n g a. His name
sounds like the slogan for a fif-
teenth - century peasants' revolt.
His life evolved for awhile like a
drunk sportwriter's f a v o r i t e
cliche plot.
Scion of a nuclear physicist
from Rochester,.N.Y., Michigan's
ace 177,pound w r e s t l e r went
through :the standard adolescent
trip of steady booking, lots of
sports, plenty of good times-a
regular Ivy League background.
Princeton wanted him to play
football, and he was all set to go
there w h e n s o m e disturbing
thoughts flashed t h r o u g h his
mind.
Princeton was all-male. Prince-
ton was Presbyterian. Michigan
was neither.
"I decided I'd have a better
social life and overall college ex-
perience here," he explains off-
handedly. "I figured everyone
just studied there (at Prince-
ton)."
Studying is not his problem. A
pre-med zoology m a j o r, - Rob
keeps his grades hovering just
below the 3.8 level, and has filled
out the med-school applications
for Harvard and several other
prestige institutions.

dIaiy
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
CLARKE COGSDILL
This makes him sound just like
the man Amos Alonzo Stagg's
generation had in mind when it
created the concept of the "scho-
lar-athlete"-many years before
people like Chris Schenkel made
that phrase quasi-meaningless.
But even that doesn't come
close to capturing the personal-
ity of a guy who comes across
like the typical pale, handsome,
b 1 0 n d, curly-haired, muscular
Jack Armstrong-type All-Ameri-
can anarchist who lives next
door.
"He came here completely un-
recruited and unheralded,' Mich-
igan wrestling coach Rick Bay
reminisces. "I think I corres-
ponded with him once, but that
was about it. It was a complete
surprise when he came out."
It was even more of a surprise

when Rob showed what he could
do on the mat. Relying on a
style whose cornerstone is the
exceptionally-heavy use of his
legs to confuse and tie up -his
opponent, Rob popped up with
moves which "no sane wrestling
coach would teach to any wres-
tler at any time on any level," in
Bay's words.
"My philosophy," the W Aver-
ine mentor continues, "is that
when a guy shows up with an
unorthodox style, you don't try
to change him at first. In fact,
if he's able to beat some good
people with it, you leave it alone.
"Well, Rob beat some pretty
decent guys and I just couldn't
believe it. His style still gives me
ulcers at times, but it works."
Following ,the c li c h e script
exactly, Rob became a freshman
sensation, sweeping through an
undefeated dual meet season in
1970-71 and placing a "disappoint-
ing" third at the Big Tens. Then,
he confounded all observers by
deciding to leave the team.
Rob recalls that "it (wrestling)
put me under real stress. I
couldn't sleep nights, I'd been
wrestling four years and I just
didn't have the desire to put up
with it anymore."
Bay proffers some additional
reasons. "Rob was under some
pressure from home to go full-
time academically," he remem-
bers. "There wasn't much inter-
est in his athletic achievements.
Besides, Rob was a bit of a non-
conformist: he wanted to start
practice a bit later than the other
guys, and he didn't like the
grooming rule.
"I never thought there was
anything malicious about his at-
titude. In fact, I've always felt
kinda close to Rob. We've talked
at the beginning of each year,
and this year he just decided to
come out. Don't ask me why."
"I was getting bored with the
other things I was doing," Rob
asserts. "I was on the rugby
team for awhile, and it got to
be where I was the only guy
really running hard and doing
the work. In wrestling, you only
blame yourself if you lose, and
no-one can just say they're bet-

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t
f
f
t

"""'."

" - ""'

I1

TEN
ROWS
DEEP
SBob Heuer --_____

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
ROB HUIZENGA DOES his thing, and Purdue's Harry Downing feels the sting. This clever maneuver,
guaranteed to end all resistance, is but one of the many weird moves Rob uses to score victories like the
18-2 superior decision illustrated here. Conqueror of Clarion State star Bill Simpson, the Wolverines'
177-pound zoology major will be one of the favorites to take Big Ten and national honors at his weight.

g-

J

Walton's gang's grea. .
... but not THAT great
F YOU CAUGHT the wire service basketball polls this week,
you saw UCLA back in the top spot after a week of Notre
Dame-imposed exile. The Bruins avenged the breaking of their
88-game winning streak by pounding the Irish into submission,
94-7 proving, for now, that the talented crew from South Bend
was a mere pretender to the throne that sits in Westwood.
In the wake of UCLA's two-game set with Notre Dame, few
basketball fans would dispute the claim that the Bruins are
playing the best college ball in the country-again. In fact, that
statement has been-thrown around to the point of boredom and
deserves neither repetition nor analysis. But the inquiring mind
presses ever on, in infinite pursuit of comparison.
Consider this:
* Despite its overwhelming talent, this year's UCLA team
doesn't rate with the vintage championship teams of the 60's.
Why isn't this Bruin team the best? They have amassed the
lion's share of the longest winning streak in major college his-
tory. Opponents point to them like never before. They are often
literally impossible to stop on offense. The guy who told Tommy
Curtis before a high school game that he would shoot him if he
scored over 30 points had the right idea, that's the only defense
I can see working on this year's Bruins.
But I still can't call them the best ever. Call it a personal
bias, but there are things about the Walton Gang I don't like
(excluding, of course, the incredible ability of its namesake).
If you saw the second UCLA-Notre Dame clash last Satur-
day, you saw Notre Dame fall behind in the first half and you
saw the game turn into a rout in the second half. But the Irish
were not run off the court. They were not outclassed. And much
as I dislike Notre Dame as an athletic institution, I thought
they played a good ballgame Saturday night.
"So what?" you say. "Just because the opposition didn't
lay down and die, that doesn't diminish UCLA's brilliance."
I disagree. Bruin teams of old turned other great teams into
disorganized collections of uncoordinated, bumbling idiots. Cases
in point? Houston (circa 1968) and Michigan (circa 1965).
Houston beat the Lew Alcindor edition in the Astrodome
back in January of '68 and the Bruins had to wait six weeks to
get a return engagement.
It came in the NCAA semi-finals when Alcindor and his sup-
porting cast, including Lucius Allen, Edgar Lacey and Lynn
Shackelford, made Elvin Haves et. al. wish they'd missed the
team bus to the game. The final score read UCLA 101, Houston
69 . . quite a dethroning for the top-ranked team in the country
to endure.
But that wasn't the only time UCLA made mince meat of
a number one ranked team in the NCAA tournament. Back
when most of us were in elementary school, a guy named
Cazzie led the Michigan Wolverines to a once-beaten Big Ten
season, a victory in the Mideast regional, and a semi-final
win over Bill Bradley's Princeton club.
The Wolverines had the number one ranking, an awesome
height and muscle advantage, and an amazing cool under pres-
sure. But none of that meant much when they couldn't get the
ball across half-court, twice in a row.
After jumoing off to an early lead, Michigan found itself out-
bustled, overhauled, and just plain blown out by a ferocious
Br in oress feturing the likes of Gail Goodrich, Ken McCintosh,
Mike Lynn and Keith Erickson. Only a late rally made the final
score a semi-respectable 91-80.
Johnny Wooden made pressure basketball synoomous
with UCL4A in the mid-Sixties, and only with regret did he
hnge .tvles to build around Alcindor. Since then, players
like Sidney Wicks, Curtis Rowe, Bill Walton and Keith
Wi lks have discourAged the pressure game. Against Notre
D'me, the press seemed to be little more than a nuisance.
UCLA basketball is 'still pure poetry in motion. But in the
Alcindor-Weglton era, it has relied more on pure talent; in the
H zzard-Goodrich era, it relied on speed, hustle, and a devas-
tnt-ยข f1"11coulrt Dress
All the.m tenms were (and are) great, but if you ever get a
11h unce ask Wooden which ones he had more fun coaching.
FORD __________
In 1932 and 1933, when Michigan'
football won big, Gerald Foredtdd't AT E IO
play. In 1934, he started, and the team ATTENTION
went 1-7.
ADVERTIMSRY

ter than you are. They gotta go
out and prove it."
Nobody will ever be able to
say for sure how good a wrestler
Rob might have become without
his two-year layoff. In econo-
mists' language, he paid a heavy
opportunity cost by skipping out
on the grappling subculture. And
he reaped some unusual bene-
fits.
The most spectacular of these

is a peculiar worldview which
still persists from his active role
as a non-leader of the legendary
Bullshit Party. Rob was respon-
sible-culpable, if you prefer-
for the proposal to build a plat-
form around the Union ginko tree
to keep the leaves off the ground.
He ran for SGC on that "plat-
form" a year ago, and if the
election hadn't been thrown out,
he would have won.

"I wouldn't go into politics
permanently," R o-b emphasizes.
"You have to kiss too many peo-
ple's feet, and that's not how
I want to relate to anyone. I just
want to be standing out in the
hall, joking and having a good
time."
It's too bad he wasn't around
30 years ago to give Richard
Nixon s o m e s o u n d political
advice.

WALK-ON SETS RECORD:
Wir am # " ..

hirii

- - - - - 1

r r W5/ 5/9// L."'/ N N 5/sr.v v'W/W
By RICH LERNER igan Relays, Williams placed right
Michigan t r a c k coach Dixon behind three-time Big Ten chain-
Farmer received a big surprise pion Bob Cassleman of Michigan
earlier this month-Dave Williams. State by doing a 1:11.5. He blames
Williams, a junior running in his his slower time on a case of
first varsity appearance for the nerves and is confident he will
Wolverines, broke a school record beat Cassleman next time.
and registered the second fastest' "Now that he has beaten me,"
time in the world so far this sea- Williams noted, "the pressure is
son at 600 yards by running the on him. I have nothing to lose.
distance in 1:09.8 at the Eastern "I haven't peaked yet. I have
Michigan Open Jan. 19. peaked physically but you're al-
The old Michigan record had ways ready physically. Your peak
been set by Kent Bernard at 1:09.9 is your psychological peak," the
back in 1964. Maize and Blue runner added.
IRONICALLY, Williams finished DAVE, WHO had run the 600
second then to Eastern Michigan's only three times before his great
Stan Vinson, who was clocked in run at Eastern, believes -that tac-
the identical time. His previous tical mistakes have hurt him both
best had been 1:12.5. times out. He made his move too
The following week, in the Mich- late against Vinson, and rushed'
f
NFL takes Wolverines-
Pistons murderBuffalo

mrns up ira ci1-
too soon versus Cassleman-play-' "DAVE HANDLED it very well,
ing right into his opponents' hands most athletes tread water while
either way. they're out, but he learned,"
"Dave has the physical ability," Coach Farmer said. "Dave never
Farmer claims, and adds that "he questions work, he's energetic, en-
has plenty of speed, and ample thusiastic and very easy to coach."
endurance." Williams patterns his running
"But it will be a half-dozen races style after Vinson, both running
before he's confident enough in his with a long stride. "hickenman"
tactical ability to be a national as he was called in high school
cotne, ihgnstrack men- used to lean forward too much
ocontended.hg rwhen he ran but Coach Farmer
has worked on his form and "since
Williams, who has no scholar- I've straightened up I've taken two
ship, was recruited while in high seconds off my time."

TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
as toughs by
MAHARISHI MAHESH YOGI
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SCIENCE OF CREATIVE
INTELLIGENCE
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PREPARATION FOR
DYNAMIC ACTIVITY
*LIFE EXPANDS IN
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TONIGHT
Introductory Lecture
FACULTY CLUB LOUNGE, MICHIGAN UNION
for further information-contact 761-8255
A WEEKLY LATE NIGHT
NINIGHT
ALL SEATS $ 1.50
JOHN VOIGHT
in
"THE REVOLUTIONARY"
11:15 p.m.
-E. 7f61-9700

From wire Service Reports
NEW YORK-The NFL yawn-
ed through the last rounds of
its draft yesterday, choosing six
more Michigan players in the
process.
Quarterback Larry Cipa and
defensive end / linebacker D o n
Coleman will join Paul Seal at
New Orleans, which drafted them
in the 15th and 16th rounds,
respectively. Offensive t a c k 1 e
Jim Coode was tabbed by Atlan-
ta in the seventh circuit, while
defensive tackle Doug Troszak
went to Green Bay in the tenth.
Fullback Bob Thornbladh got
picked by Kansas City in the
eleventh, and Walt Williamson,
a 14th-round choice,, goes with
Clint Haslerig to San Francisco.
Pistons power
By GEORGE HASTINGS
Special To The Daily
DETROIT -- The Detroit Pis-
tons came out of the locker room
and outscored the Buffalo Braves
194 at the beginning of the
second half last night to break
open the game, and continued to
a 111-96 rout in a National Bas-
ketball Association contest- last
night.
Piston center Bob Lanier out-
played the Braves' league-lead-
ing scorer Bob McAdoo in a
head-to-head duel, whipping in
36 points and dominating the de-

fensive boards. McAdoo finished
with 30 points.
The two teams, both fighting
for "wild-card" playoff spots in
t h e i r respective conferences,
played fairly evenly the first
half, with Detroit gaining a 56-
50 halftime edge by outpointing
the Braves 30-17 in the second
period.
* * *
Bulls bellow
CHICAGO 0P-Howard Porter,
a reserve forward, unloaded a
10-point barrage in the final five
minutes last night to spark the
Chicago Bulls to a 103-94 triumphr
over the Capital Bullets in a Na-J
tional Basketball Association con-
test.
11SCORES I
NBA
Detroit 11, Buffalo 96
Boston 120, Cleveland 108
Golden State 129, Atlanta 122
Chicago 103, Capital 94
ABA ALL-STAR GAME
East 128, West 112
NHIL
Vancouver 7, Detroit 3
N. Y. Rangers 4, Pittsburgh 2
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
N.C. State 86, Maryland 80
I W. Michigan 85, Cent. Michigan 67
Penn. St. 61, Syracuse 55
Connecticut 71, Holy Cross 68
Toledo 86, Kent State 55

school by Dave Martin, Michigan's
track coach at the time but he
headed to Muskegon Junior College
for financial and social reasons.
Williams dropped out after his first
semester because the school had
no track team. By the time he had
"gotten enough cash together" to
enroll here, Farmer had become
the track coach and he knew little
about him. When Dave walked into
Farmer's office to join the track
team, Coach Farmer was not very
encouraging. But Williams has, a
dream to run in the Olympics and
this was his only chance so he
decided to give it a try. Last year
he had to sit out of varsity com-
petition because of his transfer but
he worked out with the team and
ran kith the Ann Arbor Track
Club.
the axis
of
-s
eros
by WALTER SPINK
Schocken-$10.00
our price-$9.00
Walter Spink is professor of
Eastern Art at U of M. Pro-
fessor Spink will sign copies of
his new book Saturday, Feb. 2,
2-3 p.m.
Border's Bookshop
316 S. STATE STREET

A teammate, Geoff Le Platte,
summed it up commenting, "The
thing about Dave is that he has a
good mental attitude and he's not
scared of anybody."
$2.50 8:30 I
TORITE ONLY
TRACEY
SC HWARTZ
of the NEW LOST
CITY RAMBLERS
A brilliant musician and
performer, Tracey plays
guitar, fiddle, harmonica,
banio
1411 Hill STEET

TRAVEL
PRESENTS
SPRING BREAK TO
DEPARTS DETROIT MARCH 1 at 5:30 p.m.
RETURNS DETROIT MARCH 9 at 12:10 p.m.
$30800 per person
INCLUDES FIRST NIGHT HOTEL
AND RENTAL CAR FOR ONCE DAY
Additional hotel nights
. r.nrnnoA ~thni in I A C

v

I

" Missionary returnee
from the Caribbean.
" Guest at Father Richard
Center & St. Francis
of Assisi Church.
" Regional Vocation
Director of Holy Ghost

NEW CONCEPTS IN THEATRE
'ROUND AS A HOLE'

^W f Gil 1 iJriirftr7

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