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January 31, 1974 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-31

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

Rick
LOS ANGELES (R) - You pro-
bably remember Rick Nelson as
the serious, sometimes fumbling
little kid of The Adventures of
Ozzie and Harriet, who played
rock and roll with an expression-
less face.
But eight gold records and a
reputation as a rock and roll pio-
neer aren't enough for Nelson,
a family man who's working
hard to stay ahead in a slick,
tough business. His music has

Nelson
come a long way since "Hello
Mary Lou" and "Travelin'
Man."
"I don't pay that much atten-
tion to age," the 33 year-old Nel-
son said in an interview at his
canyon home. "I don't think
much about it. But even saying
33 sounds kinda weird."
The son of Ozzie and Harriet
stood dressed in bone - white
jeans, white ,shirt, white pullover
sweater and an ample shock of

Grown

and

growing

hair: comfortable looking but
not freaky.
Rick Nelson still comes across
as sort of serious, but self-as-
sured. There's the shadow of a
beard on his face.
"I've always felt a responsi-
bility to myself," he said when
asked why he keeps it up after
making what must be several
show business fortunes.
"You have to justify your ex-

Brom berg records

tve
David Bromberg, long a fav- whil
orite of local audiences at the Mar
Ark, has just released an al- cov
bum whose cover concept alone ''
is worth the price of the entire shoe
albumb.* rau
Waited Dead or Alive pictures wor
Bromberg in a King Kong pose thri
atop the Empire State Building, "Wi
holding an Air Force plane jea- seat
lously in his hand and being at- stin
tacked by flying duplicates of soul
the same blonde heroine. crab
Strange indeed - but it's the sa
kind of thing one expects from soa
Bromberg, master of absurdist
wit. In fact, his musical strong c
point is the humorous song. Un-
AP Photo fortunately, Wanted Dead or
Alive offers only one such cut, I
"The Holdup," which Bromberg
has often performed live in town:
So hand up the money, don't
- stand there and shiver
erTax time is coming, give alms
to the poor
Or I'll put a bullet right
through your best liver.
Wealth is disease and I am the
cure.
while you Bromberg does, however, get
hle yuck in a few stabs at the Nixon Ad- F1
Last track, ministration when he adapts a
simply "A few words in George Brooks'
h," which "Send Me to the 'Lectric Chair."
pression of Bromberg's superb acoustic
blues guitar serves the album
en the two well, especially in its solo glory
mpeccable, on "Statesboro Blues/ Church
tring pick- Bell Blues." The Grateful Dead's
"Pamela Jerry Garcia helps out on several
- for - re- of the more orchestrated tunes,
. offers the .--_- - _ _

raunchiness

Je Ann Arbor's own Tony
rkellis (responsible for the
er concept) plays bass.
The New Lee Highway Blues"
wcases Bromberg's creative
nchiness with melody and
ds reminiscent of Woody Gu-
e's travelling song style:
th our clothes stuck to the
and to our bodies/ It was a
king summer trip through
:thern hell; Eating carbonated
b/ Churning up inside/ Gas
ked service station johns/

And then we'd ride.
Two cuts on the album have
nothing to recommend them.
Dylan's "Wallflower" and Brom-
berg's version of "Kansas City"
with its loud, obnoxious brass
section are unexciting, at the
kindest.
Wanted Dead or Alive doesn't
reflecteBromberg's most appeal-
ing capabilities, and those who
have seen him live may prefer to
listen to his previous albums or
wait for his return appearance.
--DIANE LEVICK

istence, have to contribute some-
thing," he said.
His career has undergone sev-
eral changes, the latest signifi-
cant one being a realignment of
the Stone Canyon Band which
Rick records and tours with, gig-
ging at night clubs and places
like Knott's Berry Farm in Or-
ange County.
The group, most famous for
the million - selling "Garden
Party" recording, now has Ti
Grimes on drums, Jay White on
bass, Denny Lardin picking lead
guitar and Tom Brumley on ped-
al steel.
Rick writes much of the ma-
terial, and the group's sound and
musicianship are surprisingly
good, if a bit calculated.
"We play what we want to -
it's all just music you know.
Some of it is very hard to cate-
gorize," says Rick. "To this gen-
eration, I believe music has be-
come more of a necessity than a
luxury.
"The old radio and television
series redlly belonged to my fa-
ther. But the music is some-
People! Music ! Food !
BACH CLUB
presents
Barbara FAYROIAN, viola
and
Deborah BEKMAN, piano
performing
BACH: Sonata 2
in D Maj.
ALSO
Doris BRUCKNER, flute
1st chair, University Symphony!
with
Sally HERSHEY, piano
playing
MOZART: Flute Concerto,
G Ma j,
Thurs., Jan. 31--8 p.m.
E. Quad, Greene Lounge
EVERYONE WELCOME
No musical knowledgeneeded
ADMISSION 50c
Pineapple Upside-down Cake
served afterward.
There will be a short election of
officers before the program.
FURTHER INFO: 761-9578

thing I did, something for my-
self. I just want to do the best
I can."
Rick lives with his wife, Kris,
an artist, in one of those out-of-
the-way foliage - filled canyons
that make Los Angeles what it
is. Their children include a
daughter, 10, and 6-year old twin
sons.
Out back is a barn for the
horses and a pregnant goat. A
tire swing hangs on two pieces
of hemp from a tree. The place
looks like a movieland farm,
complete with a bright red Pan-
tera parked out front.
"We like to ride," Rick said.
"There are about 40 miles of fire
roads and trails out there. We
can ride all the way to the beach
if we want to.
"The house is great," he said.

"It's a good place for me to
write, and to relax. When I work,
I work really hard."
Nelson's career has included
recent television roles, one of
them a portrayal of a rapist.
"I really like performing mu-
sic on the stage, but I'm still in
the acting business, too. We're
considering some other parts
right now."
The rest of the Nelson family
is also doing well. Rick's broth-
er, David, has formed a TV
commercial company and has
directed several films.
Ozzie and Harriet, their par-
ents, are in semi-retirement,
their most recent effort being a
series about a couple who rent
rooms to two college girls after
their children have grown and
departed.

Rick iNelson

Kottke's Ice Wat
moves to new dep

Guitarist Leo Kottke once lik-
ened his own voice to geese
farts on a muggy day. It would
be cruel to agree with that. Let's
just say his guitar is unbeatable
and that his vocals are, well, on-
key, on his latest album, Ice Wa-
ter (Capitol ST-11262).
Assisted with fine dobro and
steel guitar by Cal Hand, Kottke
has designed Ice Water with
some kind of circular concept in
mind. The first cut, Kottke's
own "Morning is the Long Way
Home," speaks of a child and
images of fish:
I heard your voice at mid-
night/ By the river shore
I saw your child sleeping/ Be-
hind an open door
The moon was in the river/
Shining up from the floor
And the fish swam like moos-
light/ Through your child's
closing door
And morning is the long way
home ... .

Puzzle that one out
listen to the album'sI
an instrumental titled<
Child Should Be a Fis
really does give the im'
the water's depths.
Sandwiched in betwe
is plenty of Kottke's ii
intricate six and 12-si
ing. Tom T. Hall's
Brown," a thank - you
jecting - me statement,
same synthesis of mus
found in the rest of t
countrv and western,
folk. Ron Elliot's "Yo
Why" boasts a catchy
somewhat slower, mel
tar work than most oft
Ice Water's worth li
musicianship of its ant
for Kottke's voice rer
of Rick Nelson's face
and Harriet: totallye
less.
-DIANE

ARTS.
IFTil FINIYU
210 S. FIFTH AVE., ANN ARBOR
761-9700
VISIT EARTH IN
ANCIENT TIMES?
NOW WEH
HAVE PRF BASED ON THE

it '( 1 ki Club
MEETING
January 31-Assembly Hall
Union-9:O p.m.
" MANDATORY meeting for all persons
signed up for Banff, Alberta trip.
" Absolute deadline for Banff deposits-
none returned or accepted after meet-
ing.
" Banff trip is filled--however cancella-
tions may open some spaces.
" Info on trip to Collingwood, Ontario on
Feb. 8, 9, 10. Skiing at Blue Mountain
and Georgian Peaks. Two nights lodg-
ing, 2 breakfasts and 1 dinner: $21.
Lifts are $8 per day.
Trip leader: Roger Palm, 668-7225.
" Info on later weekend trips and possibil-
ity of local trips.

I

C
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f
I
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i
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Ia

T THE FUTURE OF INSTITUTIONAL CHURCHES

ical styles
he album:
rock, and
u Tell Me
tune and
lower gui-
the tracks.
ies in the
tists alone,
minds one
on Ozzie
expression-
LEVICK

r

-I

T r E E TU E
H/GHR/SE &
TEENAGE FANTASIES
I a
DOUBLE FEATURE
HIGH S 0100 DROP OUTS
POWER of LOVE
arU&CINEMA
STARTS WED, Jtan. 30
"BEHIND THE GREEN DOOR'

WILL THEY SURVIVE?
DAVID MOBERG, Phd.
Department of Sociology
and Anthropology
Marquette University
Milwaukee, Wisc.

What Forms Will They Take?
JOSEPH FICHTER, S.J., Phd.
Department of Sociology
Loyola University, New Orleans

I

Lord of Light Lutheran Church
St. Mary's Chapel
United Methodist-Wesley Foundation

Canterbury House
University Reformed Church

8:00 P.M.-FRIDAY, FEB. 1, 1974
MODERN LANGUAGE BUILDING-AUDITORIUM NO. 1
SPONSORED BY:

SHOWTIMES
Mon.-Fri. 7:00-9:00
Sat. & Sun. 1-3-5-7-9

V"'THE oax d r

No"

i

'1 Ii iDEDIL TRiACK S

COMING SOON!
"W INK NOW" O

OPEN 12:45 I3
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, & 9
-

WOODY ALLEN
TAKES A
NOSTALGIC LOOK
AT THE
FUTURE.,T
MICHIGAN THEATRE
605 E. Liberty
Dial 665-6290
4Wd00y Diaqte
cAlleqaIad'Iw"aton
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I

Bernard has room for fiving
if you want to be on your own, but you want more than four walls,
you'll get more than just a room to study and sleep in at our, place.
You'll have room to entertain and be entertained. Room for
friends and social activities. Room to live the way you like. So . .
make the right move.

1214 South
University

THE
BEST
LOVE
CCTfADY

The Chronicle of Higher Education
1717 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036
Q Please send me The Chronicle for one year (42 issues).Bill m0
later at the regular rate of $21.( e
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