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January 31, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-31

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
b O irms atdverising costs
Nty half as much as as research

Page Three
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
:" +. 4.S VAAV..%M. A A...

WASHINGTON OP) - While the
oil companies were supposed to
be preparing for the energy
crisis they were dumping at last
half as much money into adver-
tising as research, Rep. Charles
Rangel said yesterday.
The New York Democrat said
a study conducted by the Gen-
eral Accounting Office shows that
six of the country's largest oil
companies spent over $425 mil-
lion for advertising from 1970 to
1972 and $$795 million on re-
search for the same period.

The figures represent adver-
tising expenditures for Exxon,
Texaco, Gulf, Mobil, Standard
Oil of Indiana and Shell, Rangel
said. He said the GAO was un-
able to obtain figures for Stand-
ard Oil of California.
RANGEL SAID the statistics
showed that Gulf spent $6 million
more advertising than research
in 1970, and that in the same
yeaf, Standard Oil of Indiana
spent approximately as much on
advertising as on research.'

Clergy confidentiality
questioned by courts

"The GAO figures, and infor-
mation collected by my staff
shows that in the period when oil
companies now claim to have
been preparing for the oil crisis,
they were actually spending
more than half as much on ad-
vertising as they were on re-
search and development activi-
ties," Rangel said.
MEANWHILE, the energy cris-
is that prompted you to turn
down your lights has prompted
utilities to ask permission to
charge you more for using less.
An Associated Press survey
showed that utilities are seeking
or have been granted rate in-
creases that many say are need-
ed to offset declining profits
caused by energy conservation
efforts that have cut electricity
usage.
In addition, Americans are
finding their bills going up be-
cause of fuel price increases that
companies are allowed to pass
on to their customers automatic-
ally.
The AP survey showed that
virtually every area of the coun-
try was feeling the pinch and
state commissions responsible
for reviewing electricity rates
said they were swamped with re-
quests for increases.

Thursday, January 31
Day Calendar
Industrial & Operations Engrg.: C.
Kirkwood, U of Colorado, "Cardinal So-
cialkwelfare Functions for Public Deci-
sion Making," 325 W. Engin. Bldg., 9'
am.
Bus. School Marketing Club: "Clio
1973 T.V. Advertising Awards," 130 Bus.
Ad.. noon.
Maternal Child Health Films: "Story
of a Lonely Harlem Boy," 3042 SPH I,
noon.
Ethics, Religion: B. Linderman, yoga
teacher, "Yoga & Its Spiritual Con-
text," Aud. A. Angell Hall, 3 pm.
MHRI: M. Blumenthal, "More About
Violence," 1057 Mental M1th. Res. Inst.,
3:45 pm.
Ctr. Early Childhood Development,
Education : "What is Quality Care for.
Infants & Toddlers?" Schorling Aud.,
SEB, 4 pm.
Geology, Mineralogy: G. Kennedy, U
of C, Los Angeles, "Structure of the
Mantle," 2501 CC Little, Bldg., 4 pm.
Nuclear Conoq.: F. Schmidt, U. of
Washington, "Do Hadron Cross Sec-
tions Fluctuate Like Nucleon Cross
Sections?" P-A Bldg. Colloq. Rm., 4 pm.
SOC: 3X Union, 7:30 pm.
Women's Studies Films: "Nobody
Victim;" "It Happens to Us," Lec. Rm.
1, MLB, 7:30 pm.
Music School: University Philhar-

monia, V. Poole, conductor, Hill Aud.,
8 pm.
Medieval, Renaissance Collegium:
"Thomas Aquinas on Natural & Human
Law," 236 Hutchins Hall, Law Quad, 8
pm.
General Notices
Hopwood Award Petitions Dues: Feb-
ruary 1, 1974, in Hopwood Room.
THE MICHIGAN PAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 101
Thursday, January 31, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. N:ews phone
764-0562 Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily rueday through Sunday morning
Iiri o. the Univer ity year at 420 May-
nard1 Street. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio ; $12 non-local mail (other states
and freign)
Summer session publish es Tuesday
througnsaturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area)- $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio): $7.00 non-fo:al mail rother
states and foreign).
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
PLAY-OF-THE-MONTH
CLARE LUCE'S
THE TWOMEN
at the
AACT WORKSHOP BLDG.
201 MULHOLLAND
FRI. and SAT. at 8 p.m.
DONATION
662-9405

AP Photo
Golda accepts request for new government
Israel Premier Golda Meir discusses plans with Israel President Katzir yesterday; just before an-
nouncing that she has accepted Katzir's request to form a new government in Israel.
PLANES FLY OVER PROVINCE:
Bolivian forces attempt
contro over protests

WASHINGTON (UPI) - The
Supreme Court may have to
grapple with one of the most
delicate of church - state ques-
tions: clergy confidentiality.
The case arose when Dr. Paul
Boe, director of the Division of
Social Service of the American
Lutheran Church, refused torans-
wer certain questions to a grand
jury investigating the seizure of
Wounded Knee, S.D., by Ameri-
can Indian Movement activists
last spring.
BOE, who spent 10 days in
Wounded Knee, refused toans-
wer some questions put to him
by the grand jury - particul-
arly about identity of people he
might have seen carrying guns-
on grounds an answer would vio-
late the confidence of what he
believed was a legitimate pas-
toral relationship.
In mid-January, the Eighth
U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals
reversed the contempt citation
only an hour before Boe was to
begin what could have been 14
months in jail.
But the court did not address
itself to the question of clergy
confidentialy and instead rev-

ersed the
grounds.

WHILE temporarily free, Boe
still could be called before the
grand jury and the whole pro-
cess could be carried out with
more attention to the technicali-
ties.
If that were to happen, the
question of clergy confidentiality
probably would wind up in the
Supreme Court.

decision on technical

-I

Shop at

FOLLETTS.
for TEX TBOOKS
and SUPPLIES

runo

c

LA PAZ, Bolivia ((P)) - The
armed forces declared a central
province a "military zone" yes-
terday and sent air force planes
streaking over the area where
thousands of peasants are pro-
testing food price increases.
The, military tried to tighten
its control around the city of Co-
chabamba in the province after
small groups of the estimated
12,000 protesters shot at soldiers,
Gen. Oscar Adriazzola told news-
men. He is head of the armed
forces combined general staffs.
It was not immediately clear if
declaring the province a mili-
tary zone was tantamount to de-
claring martial law, which re-
lieves the military of constitu-
tional restraints in restoring or-

der.
"Armed extremists ... are in-
ducting the peasants to get
drunk and are leading them as-
tray," the general said.
AIR FORCE sources said the
warplanes were sent over the
area only for "purposes of dis-
suasion." The planes did not
fire on the peasants, the sources
said.
Adriazzola said "all necessary
measures" will be adopted to re-
store order in,. the area. The
roadblocks kept food and other
supplies from reaching Cocha-
bamba, a city of about 200,000
about 150 miles south of La Paz.
Soldiers had not managed to
clear roadblocks and reopen
three main highways to traffic,

he said.
AN UNCONFIRMED report by
a Cochabamba newspaper said
six persons were killed and three
wounded Tuesday night when
soldiers tried to clear the roads.
Guillermo Bulacia, President
Hugo Banzer's minister of in-
formation, told newsmen there
had been "exaggerated reports
and rumors" about the protests.
He did not mention any casual-
ties.

artz
1111

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ale

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and Save Money, too!

._._________._______

PARK

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Deluxe 1-2-3 Bedroom Apts.
* Fully furnished & carpeted
" Garbage disposals
" Locked storage
" Live-in resident manager
" Private underground parking-free
-24 hr. emergency service
* Burglar alarm system for each apt.
" Cable TV-free
See Brent or Sharon Clark,
Apt. 10-769-5014

Douglass Sound puts together stereo
systems by quality manufacturers
to insure you quality sound. An
example system features the Mar-
antz 2015 receiver, the new EPI
90 speaker and the BSR 310AXE
turntable. 'i'he Marantz has 15 watts,
RMS, per channel and other must
features like center tuning meter,
loudness control, and tape monitor.
Sale 1397.

lhigh quality sound for even less
money is here as EPI gives you the
sound of their famous model 100
now in an attractive vinyl covered
enclosure. The new BSR 31OAXE is
featured with damped cueing, full-
sized platter, anti-skate control, and
magnetic cartridge with elliptical
stylus.
We sound better

I

r

Our $675 Sony Powered System
Sounds Even Better at $517

'I

-

DO YOU KNOW...
what the oldest building on campus is?
how many bricks there are in the law quad?
who Samuel Trask Dana was?
WHO CARES!!
If you'd like to work with new students, sign
up to be a fall orientation leader in the UAC
Office (Room 2N) in the Michigan Union,
starting January 31. Interviews begin Monday,
February 4' and continue through February 22.
The University of Michigan is a non-discrimi-
notory, affirmative-action employer.

FACTS ON ABORTION
YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT:
* Abortions are legal in Michigan and easily available for early
pregnancies
" Early abortions ne.ed not cost more than $150, for total care
" Some rdinics are better than others
" U of M counseling and medical staff have approved
KEEMER CLINIC............. 1-961-9779
SUMMIT MEDICAL CENTER ... 1-272-8450
WOMEN'S HEALTH SERVICE . . 1-272-2100
* All the above clinics perform free pregnancy testing and pro-
vide counseling services
" Late abortions (over 12 weeks from the last menstrual period)
must be performed in a hospital
For more information or pregnancy counseling, call the above
clinics or:
EAST CLINIC, Health Service Afternoons 3-5, Mon.-Fri.
207 Fletcher 763-1210
STUDENT SERVICES, Counseling Services 9-5, Mon.-Fri.
3rd Floor, Mich. Union 764-8437
ETHICS AND RELIGION 9-5, Mon.-Fri.
3rd Floor, Mich. Union 764-7442
MENTAL HEALTH CLINIC 8-5, Mon.-Fri.
2nd Floor, Health Service 764-8313
WOMEN'S CRISIS CENTER 2 p.m.-1 a.m.
306 N. Division (St. Andrews Church) 761-WISE
BACH
B MINOR MASS
U. of . ChamberChoir a Orcestra
THOMAS H1LBISH, Conductor
FRIDAY, FEB. 15-8:00 P.M.

When it comes to good stereo sound
Douglass Sound puts together quality
systems for total enjoyment. The Sony
STR-7045 receiver, a pair of Jensen 3
speakers, and a BSR610AW/x is a
system planned for enjoyment over a
long period of time. Loaded with fea-
tures that are important, The Sony
has a real 30 RMS watts/channel plus
precision bass and treble controls, tape
monitor, loudness control, FM muting,

and center tuning meter. The, famous
smooth sound of the Jensen 3 speaker
is a well deserved complement to this
package. It features a walnut cabinet,
and 'fit anywhere' looks. The BSR610
provides many features youm' llenjoy
having like a synchronous motor, full-
sized platter, damped cueing, and ADC
cartridgedwith elliptical stylus. Enjoy
the sound of good music at a low
price during our sale.
0CE Sale*517

1 r, -
OWN
k 4L m_ i
al)d

~6 .Uhi3~,4 (^

LIST P
$675.01

t
,y
< ,
{
;:
Y
F';
.
')

k

Best Cassette
S The best cassette tape deck on the
market! Features three motors for fast
forward/rewind and precise recording
and playback, Dolby, automatic end-
stop, hot pressed ferrite heads, and many
other Tandberg features.
Sale $399.

TANDBER G TCD-oo

/Oow-

Popular Elliptical
T he ev er popular Shure NI-91I ED is on sale at
Douglass Sound T racks between 3 ands1/2 grams.
Elliptical stylus. Regular price $55.
SSale 2Q.

I

- I"i

i-m -

im-

-----X XX X XX xX z --X X~~ XX X xx xj
* ,Y. ,,,YM. T V.. Yr' Y, cK t ~a .K K c c K K M. .

New World C
** TRUFI
**SHOO
PI NO
7 &9 P.M. W'N
N
S.-. EX

inema Showcas
FAUT'S,
IT THI
PLA Y
ED. & THURS., Jan.
atural Science Audi
KT WEEK-

"'TTT TTTT '
pp'4
4'
E4
r 4'
4'
ER 4
30&31 4
Corium 4

K .
-Vt .
SPIOJN-En,

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7'1

Some Great Sound

RESERVED SEATS
Main Floor and 1 st Balcony
(Middle sections)
Side Sections Main Floor
and 1st Balcony
2nd Balcony

isOn
Sale
If you're considering a
small speaker system you
should listen to the fam-
ous EPI 100. Find out why
the 100 is rated the most
accurate sounding low-
priced speaker system.
Come in and listen to it.
The sound is fantastic!
REG. $94.00
Sale $79.

\ \

Technics
byPanssonic
Direct Drive
Turntable
The SL-1200 turntable incorporates
the most advanced concepts in turn-
table design. Direct drive all but eli-
minates wow flutter and vibration.
Multi-pole brushless bC motor. Elec-
tronic speed control. Illuminated
strobe, low capacitance phono cables,
damped cueing, and anti-skate con-
trol. Normally sells for $300.
Sale $258.

$3.00
$2.50
$1.50

Students
$2.00
$1.50
$1.00

MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED THROUGH FEBRUARY 11
Make checks payable: U. of M. Chamber Choir
Return order to: U. of M. Chamber Choir
School of Music
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105
FOR INFORMATION CALL 764-7592

The open-air design of the Pioneer
SE-L40 stereo headphones makes them
truly unique. Extremely light weight.
Top notch bass reproduction. Adjust-
able head band and earpieces.
:±3i~l CI . Sale ,28.

(P

Why Buy From Us.
Fl, pc ivtw \ Auiodi sors .Cosistant lProduct lEvialuation.

d~ouglass

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