100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 30, 1974 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, January 30, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

w

stai
Ed. Note: This story was compiled
from reports filed by Editors C. Andrew
Bloom, D. H. Borus, F. Longo and Rich-
ard W. Stuck.
MICHIGAN'S SUCCESSFUL season was
reflected in yesterday's NFL draft as four
if the Wolverines', leading seniors were
tabbed in the first four rounds.
All-American defensive tackle Dave Gal-
lagher was named by the Chicago Bears
in the first round, the twentieth man se-
lected. .He was joined in the second round
by fellow co-captain and tight end Paul
Seal, who was picked by the New Orleans
Saints. Fullback Ed Shuttlesworth was se-
lected immediately afterwards by the Bal-
timore Colts. Wingback Clint Haslerig went
in the fourth round to the San Francisco
49'ers.
Gallagher was elated to go as high as he
did. "It was a real honor," he said. Gal-
lagher was drafted last week in the third
round by the Boston Bulls of the new WFL.
Although the Piqua, Ohio native had
hoped to be drafted by the Cincinnati Ben-
gals or the New Orleans Saints, he did
make it known that he preferred playing
in the "established league."
Though neither league has yet to make
an offer to Gallagher, the tackle, a pre-
med student, wants to combine playing
professional ball with a career as a medical
student. He has applied to Northwestern's

look

to

pros

Medical School and hopes that "if he is
accepted, the Bears could pay the school's
costs."
BUT THE NFL challenge looms large in
Gallagher's mind. He has heard that the
Bears are thinking of moving Dick Butkis
and his wounded knees to center and he
didn't relish the thought of scrimmaging
against the alleged meanest man in the
pro game, but he is willing.
Seal, Haslerig, and Shuttlesworth live to-
gether and all were quite happy at the
news.
"I am really happy," said fullback Shut-
tlesworth. "I was surprised since I hadn't
heard from them before.
"San Francisco and Dallas talked to me
before the draft."
Asked about the chances that he would
ink a pact with the new Detroit Wheels,
who gained rights to him in last Monday's
WFL draft, Suttlesworth replied, "I'll listen
to what they have to say before I sign."
But the chances are that Big Ed will talte
the trip to Baltimore. "They told me I
would have a great chance of making the
ball club. They only had four running backs
at the end of last year and I was the first
running back they picked."
Though it might not enter into his deci-
sion, Easy Ed was glad to rejoin former
Wolverine great Glenn Doughty. "That

ought to be nice," said Ed, "we played to-
gether before."
HASLERIG WAS equally happy at his
selection. "I was a bit nervous before, won-
dering whether I'd get picked. I didn't think
San Francisco would pick me up. But it's
a great opportunity and a great challenge.
That club puts the ball up in the air." Has-
lerig, who can play most skill positions, will
most likely be used as a wide receiver in
the pros.
Like his housemates and Gallagher, Has-
lerig is taking a "wait and see" attitude
toward the fledgling WFL. "Well, I'll listen
to what they say. As for prestige, the NFL's
got it. But I'm not going because of loca-
tion. I'm a football player, not a tourist."
Regardless of where he goes, Haslerig's
got the confidence that he will stick. "I
know a lot about the game and I can play
' it well!"
At press time, Seal was dining out, but
the Daily did learn that he was quite
happy at his selection, even though some
experts thought Seal was first round mate-
rial.
For the trio, there was a sad note. "It's
sort of sad breaking up, but there's a new
challenge ahead," said Haslerig.
Those challenges look like the NFL foot-
ball, but the WFL may still be heard from.

PAUL SEAL (83) leads Chuck
Heater on a power sweep against
Oregon. Renowned as an excel-
lent blocker, Seal seldom had a
chance to show off his pass
catching talents as a tight end
in Bo Schembechler's ground
conscious attack. As a New Or-
leans Saint, Seal's lot will change
in that regard. In Archie Man.
ning, the Saints have a quarter-
back that loves to fire the ball,
and Seal should pick up the kind
of pass receiving stats that will
augur well for his financial
future.

Daily Photo by KEN FINK

PASS
THE
TOMATOES,
PLEASE
Bob McG inn
Muham med Al .. .
...mpressions of triumph
BOXING IS SURELY the most basic of sports - man against
man, survival of the fittest. But unless you're at ringside,
it's also the most difficult to comprehend.
And when you're sitting in the last row, in the balcony yet,
of the oversold local theater, with a fuzzy, black-andwhite picture
away off in front of you, you might as well forget it.
Say what you will, but if somebody had cut off Don
Dunphy's microphone wires nobody in the place would have
been sure what was going on.
You have to be there in person, within four or five rows
of the ring, and looking point-blank into a man's face to know
f he has been hurt. Or if he is afraid. Or if he is confident.
If you're not, and you're in the situation I was in Monday
night, you squint hard and hope Dunphy is his usual accurate
self.
For eight rounds Monday night these two supermen, Mu-
hammad Ali and Joe Frazier, flailed away at each other on
the big screen.
All had far the better of it in the early going in what
the marquee outside blared as a "grudge match," and the
packed house loved every minute of It. Frazier looked small,
almost pathetic as the towering, dancing Ali flicked effort-
lessly jab after jab against his head.
In fact, Ali looked so superior that for a brief moment late
in the second round it appeared as if Smokin' Joe was heading for
an early exit. He weathered the storm, though, but Ali looked
invincible.
Gradually, however, Frazier's t
bull-like rushes began taking
their toll, as they had t h r e e
years earlier in the same Mad-
ison Square Garden ring.
He won the third round, broke
even in the fourth and fifth, and
then took command of the fight
in the seventh and eighth from
his rapidly tiring tormentor.
The Frazier fans had been no-
ticeably restrained throughout,
but their man's pounding left
hooks sand deep body shots gave
them their first wisp of victory.
And as they screamed, the vast
Ali audience drew silent.
How much did Ali have left?
Could he blunt the unrelently
Frazier? Or was it the begin-
ning of the end of what h a d]
started out as a glorious night
for "The Champ."
Then, just as Frazier jumped off his stool for round nine,
the closed-circuit cameras zoomed in for one of their few close-
up shots of the evening.
There was Frazier, grinning, leering, and then, almost in-
credibly, beckoning at Ali.
Now, Frazier is very aware of his abilities, but it has always
been clear, at least in his fighting style, that he isn't cocky or
flamboyant.
There really just isn't any other way to describe this un-
characteristic outburst of emotion but to think that in his mind
he felt he had the fight won. He would knock out Ali, and rid
himself forever of the man he has so hated for so long.
But Ali, who had cast three and a half years of his box-
ing prime with those who opposed an unjust war, and who
seemed on the brink of a humiliating knockout defeat, some-
how summoned four rounds of his boyhood magic to win
the fight going away.
It was a phenomenal climax to a superb bout, one which
pales in comparison to the pair's dramatic title spectacle in
1971, but nevertheless must still rang among the ring's greatest
fights.
In retrospect one must wonder why Monday's result was
different than in their scrap three years ago.
Ali pointed to his rustic training camp in central Pennsyl-
vania, where he closeted himself for three months, as the
big difference, and it was abundantly clear that he was in
far better shape this time around.
Some may also say that Frazier wasn't the same man he
was before the beatings Ali and George Foreman gave him,
and they may be right.
But he took everything Ali could hit with, just as he did in

LIONS SNATCH O'NEIL

Too
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Faced with the
spectre of possible bidding wa
to sign its talent, the Nationa
Football League labored through
almost four hours on the open
ing round of its annual collegiate
draft yesterday.
The big news for Michigan fans
on the first round was that Dav
Gallagher, the Wolverines' All
American defensive tackle, wa
chosen by the Chicago Bears.
The second round saw tigh
end Paul Seal and fullback Ed
Shuttlesworth selected by New
Orleans and Baltimore, respec
tively, on back-to-back picks
Clint Haslerig went to San Fran
cisco as a wide receiver on th
fourth round.
Most of the teams choosing in
the opening round took the ful
limit of 15 minutes to make thei
choices after the Dallas Cowboy
opened the draft by picking de
fensive lineman Ed Jones from
Tennessee State. New Orlean
even stretched into overtim
when a mid-draft trade with De
troit confused the issue.
"There was never any ques

Tall's
r daily
h
E-
e sports
s NIGHT EDITOR:
e JOHN KAHLER
I-
5 --
tion about him being No. 1," said
t Gil Brandt, head of the Cowboys'
d scouting operation. "Potentially,
w he has as much ability as any-
one I've seen in the league in
. some time."
1- The opening round lasted three
e hours, 45 minutes and was the
second longest since the univer-
n sal draft began in 1967. The
Il shadow of the rival World Foot-
r ball League, which ran through
s adraft rounds in less than two
hours last week, hung over the
n session.
is Seven players were chosen it.
e the first round by both leagues,
- creating what could turn into a
money battle. The conflict sur-
- faced immediately w h e n San

y
t'

elected
Diego followed Dallas' opening
selection of Jones by choosing
running back Bo Matthews of
Colorado, who had been chosen
by Toronto in the first round of
the WFL draft.
Later in the first round, Ala-
bama running back Wilbur Jack-
son, picked by Birmingham in
the WFL, went to San Francisco
in the NFL. The 49ers used their
entire 15-minute time limit be-
fore announcing the selection.
Then Heisman Trophy winner
John Cappelletti went to Los An-
geles. The WFL's Philadelphia
franchise owns his rights in the
new league.
The first player signed at the
draft was John Hicks, Ohio
State's big offensive tackle, who
wsvs chosen by the New York
Giants in the opening round. He
was unveiled at an impromptu
news conference where he said
he had agreed to "a iulti-year
contract with good fringe bene-
fits."
Another quick .switch, this one
between teams, created some
confusion. New Orleans owned
the eighth choice in the draft
but when the Saints- turn came
up, it was announced they had
traded the choice to Detroit for
the Lio3< choice, No. 13 in the
rotation, and c e n t e r Dave
The op 2r0
By The Associated Press

first

Thompson. Detroit employed the
choice to take Penn State line-
backer Ed O'Neil.
But when the draft moved to
its 13th selection, both the Lions
and Saints prepared to make a
selection. Detroit claimed the
trade was Thompson for New
Orleans' first round pick and
that the Lions still retained their
own first round choice.
While NFL officials scurried
between the two teams' tables,
the 15-minute draft clock ran
out. After another 10 minutes,
Commissioner Pete Rozelle an-
nounced that New Orleans had
picked Ohio State linebacker
Rick Middleton.
That did not mean, said Ro-
. zelle, that the disputed trade had
been settled. "We had to let the
draft proceed as it was," he
said. ''There was no way of un-
tangling it now. This does not
mean it's a dead issue. If there
is* still a dispute, we will meet
:with both teams after the draft
and, if necessary, work out the
problem."
1--
$2.50 go

TOMORROW on Gene's Blues
Luther Allison Special
Including tapes of this week's
live performance at the
PRIMO SHOWBAR
and
selected comments by Luther himself
8:30-midnight on WCBN-FM, 89.5
generation
is BACK! Pick up a copy at your local bookstore. AND, we
want good poetry, prose, essays, music, graphics and photo-
graphs for the SPRING ISSUE,
featuring a long, visionary poem, the score for a string quartet,
and the UM's first BLACK ANTHOLOGY, only one of its kind
in a university lit. magazine today.
SUBMIT, or come help us put it together
Deadline: Feb. 5, but flexible
(Advt. Rates available. 420 Maynard, Student Publications Bldg.
or call John: 665-9888)

The chosen few
First Round Browne. ot, Boston College; St. Louis,
Dallas, Ed Jones, DT, Tennessee St.; Greg Kindle. ot, Tennessee State; San
San Diego, Bo Mathews, FB, Colorado; Francisco, Keith Fahnhorst, te, Mn-
New York Giants, John Hicks, 0G, nesota; NEW ORLEANS, PAUL SEAL,
Ohio State; Chicago, Waymond Bry- TE, MICHIGAN; BALTIMORE, ED
,tnt, LB, Tennessee St.; Baltimore, JohnA SHUTTLESWORTI, RB MICHIGAN;
Dutton, DT, Nebraska; New York JetsMai nr ilan e ea eh
Carl Barziauskas, DT, Indiana; St. Detroit, Bily Howard, dt, Alcorn A&M;
Louis,J. V. Cain, TE, Colorado; San iego, ar arkvich, , Penn
troit, Ed O'Neil, LB. Penn St.; San: State; Atlanta, Gerald Tinker, wr. Kent
Francisco, Wilbur Jackson, RB. Ala-'State; Oakland, Dave Casper, te, No-
bama; San Francisco, Bill Sandifer, tre Dame; Cincinnati, Charlie Davis,
DT, UCLA; Los Angeles, John Cappel- rb, Colorado; Los Angeles, Bill Simp-
letti, Penn St.; Green Bay, Barty son, db, Michigan State.
Smith, FB, Richmond. New Orleans, , Third Round
Rick Middleton, LB, Ohio State; s Dallas, Danny White, rb, Arizona
Denver, Randy Gradishar, LB, Ohio State; Chicago, Wayne Wheeler, wr,
State; San Diego, Don Goode, LB, Kan- Alabama; MinnesotaStv Craig, e,
sas; Karizona St.; Minnesota, Fred MNeill, rb, Arlington St.; Kansas City. David
DE, UCLA; Buffalo, Reuben Gant, TEJaynes, qb, Kansas; Atlanta, Kim M-
Oklahoma State; Oakland. Henry Law- Qikn b eih uflGr
rence, OT, Florida A&M; CHICAGO, Marangi, qb, Boston College.
DAVE GALLAGHER. DT, MICHIGAN; Fourth Round
D~vEGALAGHR, D, MCHIAN; SAN FRANCISCO. CLINT IIASLE-
Pittsburgh, Lynn Swann, WR, USC;RIG RANMICGN;LINnTASMiE-
Dallas, Charley Young, RB, North Ca RIG,WR, MICHIGAN; Minnesota, Mike
olina St.; Cincinnati, Bill Kollar, DT, Townsend, db, Notre Dame Cincin-
Montana state; Baltimore, Roger Carr, las, Andy Andrade, rb, Northern Mich-
WR, Louisiana Tech; Minnesota, Steve )and
Riley, OT, USC; Miami, Donald Reese, ganift Round
DT, Jackson State. Buffalo, Gary Iayman, wr, Penn
Second Round State; Green Bay, Steve Odom, wr,
Minnesota, John Holland, wr, Ten- Utah; Detroit, Carl Capria, s, Purdue;
nessee state; New York Jets, Gordon Pittsburgh, Mike Webster, c, Wisconsin.

; :
2f;>:
',
:
,.;
r
,ti
<'
, :
"' .
{'' :

f

MIDNIGHT SALE.
25% OFF SPRING WEAR
35% OFF WOOLS & KNITS
FRIDAY, FEB. 1
6 p.m. to 1 o.m.
1317 S. UNIVERSITY
(NEXT TO THE V. BELL)

I

I.
2.
.,
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

UCLA (51)
N. C. State
Notre Dame (1)
North Carolina
Marquette
Maryland
Vanderbilt
Alabama
Providence
Long Beach State
Southern Cal
Indiana
Pittsburgh
S. Carolina
Louisville
Wisconsin
New Mexico
Kansas
Oral Roberts
MICHIGAN

15-1
?13,1
12-1
13-2
16-1
12-3
14-1
13-2
15-2
14-C
13-2
12-3
11-3
11-2
14-3
12-4
16-2
12-3

1,038
894
864
668
565
537
467
445
397
230
195
150
99
95
74
27
25
22
21

PHAROA SAUNDERS &
LEON THOMAS
Wednesday &Thursday
JAN. 30-31
TWO SHOWS: 9& 11:30
COMING: JERRY JEFF WALKER SUN., FEB. 3
{ ~~2333- E STADIUM BLVD.
belIow thm..Fmtir Restourofit
S'(...w,.Wnbhn...o.A..Ark..
AMP'l(t REE PARKtW-
'fi ii'Ormall ion call 00.1-121'
I A
4i

Win a FREE Trip to Europe
Tommy's Holiday Camp
announces its
rournament of Champions
Winner will be flown to Europe.
All expenses paid.
Entries begin Monday, January 28.

no

r:. . :... - E130l

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan