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January 26, 1974 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday,,

Jam

iuary 26, 1974

[HE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, Jan ucry 26, 1974

Defense

r. ".I ..

Dept.

announces

modernized nuclear policy

WASHINGTON (Reuter) - The
United States is on the way to
evolving a modern nuclear strat-
egy based not on the killing of
millions of city dwellers, but on
limited s t r i k e s at military
targets.
This significant change in over-
all nuclear doctrine came into
being last summer after years
of study and is now being pub-
licly explained by the new De-
fense S e c r et a r y, 44-year-old
James Schlesinger.
MANY OBSERVERS believe
one reason behind the decision
to make existence of the new
strategy known publicly is to try
to persuade the Soviet Union to
talk about a joint scaling down
of the more sophisticated nuclear
weapons now being developed
and to come to some new agree-
ment in the latest Strategic Arms
Limitation (SALT) Talks.
For more than 20 years, the
United States has relied on the
"assured destruction" t h e o r y,
that is, its ability to absorb a
nuclear blow and still strike back
Iat enemy cities with its own
inter - continental ballistic mis-
siles.
That capability will remain un-
der the new thinking. But what
is wanted now, in the opinion of
the nuclear strategists, is the
further capacity to use forces
in a controled way.
SCHLESINGER h a s pointed
out that in the past, the only
option open to the United States
has been to threaten mass de-
struction of, enemy cities and
territories if a nuclear strike
were launched against this coun-
try or its allies.
"We are now refining a broad-
er range of options for the Pres-
ident and those options will be
small as well as large," he said .
A year ago, President Nixon
told Congress that if the United
States had the ability to use ,ts
nuclear forces, in a controled
way, the likelihood of nuclear
response would be more credible,
"thereby m a k in g deterrence
more effective and the initial use
of nuclear weapons by an Jppo-
nent less likely."
MORE DETAILS of adminis-
tration thinking on the new
strategy are expected to be
made known when Congress con-
siders the 'new defense budget
in coming months since funds

MsmEaEm* \'s ' m#mm' sse
"We are now refining a broader
range of options for the President,
and those options will be small as.
well as large."
-Defense Secretary
James Schlesinger
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are expected to be asked for re-
search and development among
other things of sophisticated new
nuclear warheads.
Schlesinger has said that "ne
wishes to have alternatives for,
the deployment of s t r a t e g i c
forces other than a suicidal
strike against the cities of the
other side."
Another top - level administra-
tion source maintains that to say
it is the national goal of any
country to kill millions of people,
knowing that the enemy can do
the same, is insanity. Therefore,
a nuclear force capable of con-
ducting warfare against military
objectives is a necessity, this
source said.
THE NIXON administration
has probably been prompted to
take action on the new targeting
doctrine by intelligence estimates
of the Soviet Union's latest nuc-
lear research efforts.
The U.S.S.R. has four new
intercontinental ballistic missiles
in development, Schlesinger said.
Three have been tested, he add-
ed, with multiple nuclear war-
heads (MIRVS) and quite pos-
sibly the fourth would be tested
The defense secretary also said
the Soviets have three missile

submarine programs in opera-
tion.
THIS SOVIET work, in the U.S.
view, shows a great deal of vigor
and could signal a potential ad-
vantage being gained over the
United States.
Any Soviet nuclear preponder-
ance over° the United Stateas,
Schlesinger said, would be 'm-
permissible. If the Soviet Union
were able to build a major coun-
terforce a g a i n s t the United
States, "we would like a similar
option," he added.
In his latest pronouncement at
a press conference, Schlesinger
explained that U.S. intercon-
tinental ballistic missiles could
be aimed at more than one tar-
get, and an individual missile
could have multiple targets.
SCHLESINGER and his ad-

visers arguecthat the change in
targeting doctrine will enhance
deterrence and reduce the risk
of war. The emphasis on selec-
tivity and flexibility in targeting,
he adds, is necessary to shore
up deterrence.
"In our judgment," he said,
"the improvement in deterrence
will reduce the already large
risks of an outbreak of major
conflict."
Robert Ellsworth, U.S. ambas-
sador to NATO from 1969 to
1971, wrote. in a letter to the Nevi
York Times that the old strategy
of mutual assured destruction
"held hostage a major portion of
the Soviet population, and it de-
liberately guaranteed to kill a
major portion of our own pope-
lation."
"WHEN THE U.S. held sub-
stantial nuclear superiority over
the U.S.S.R., that may have been
entirely appropriate; now that
the balance of forces has changed
to our disadvantage, a different
strategy for deterrence is called
for, if indeed deterrence is to
continue to be effective ..
"The. world is more secure
with the Presi'dent having an op-
tion to respond to a possible at-
tack with something less than ai
all-out nuclear spasm directed
against the Soviet people," Ells-
worth said.

tI

The littlest victims
A family friend comforts two children who were separated from their parents after fleeing from fierce fighting near Samrong,
Cambodia, northwest of Phnom Penh. This week the bombardment of the capital city and surrounding area reached an all-time
high for the prolonged war. As government troops withdrew from S-mrong, the insurgents stepped up their attacks which in-
cluded heavy helling. (See story, Page 3).

Kent State.
Probe to
continue
National Guard
1 LiE~£ i J.EU w~

Critics argue
over Ma ugham
after 100 years

i
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1C 1UJ fL1GLLU.I (Continued from Page 2) growing murmurings of the native
it were almost ideal news agency politicians.
CLEVELAND, Ohio (P)-The fed- techniques. He stood apart, the de- Maugham was born in Paris, theC
eral grand jury investigating the Cached observer without commit- son of the lawyer for the British
1970 Kent State University shoot- ment or comment, apparently Embassy and his early language
ings heard yesterday from Maj. merely recording. and upbringing were French. By,
John Martin, a National Guard! Maugham in his long career was the age of 10 he was an orphan
commander who reportedly helped no doubt guilty of the occasional and sent to live in Whitstable, Eng-
spark the federal probe into the purple passage. But in general his land, with 'his uncle, a clergyman,
incident. style was economical, astringent, and his German-born wife. Thesef
Martin was commander of Coin- free of unnecessary adjectives. You were the most unpleasant but most
pany A, 145th Infantry, when four could - and can - read one of formative years of his life. His un-
students were killed and. nine his short stories, analyze it, dissect cle, the vicar, has been described;
wounded May 4, 1970 in an out- it, and still wonder how he was as narrow-minded, unintelligent,,
burst of gunfire from his unit and able to convey such character and pedantic, lazy, snobbish and severe
other troops. atmosphere. and Maugham was desperately un-
HE MADE ruthless use of ev- happy.
HE SPENT about three hours in erything and everybody he met. HE EVENTUALLY studied medi-'
the hearing room. He confirmed All went into his notebook ultimate- cine and made an immediate suc-
that he testified but, refused other ly to become the fodder of his cess as an author with his novel
comment. story - telling, which, as he used Liza of Lambeth which drew on
to say unashamedly, had beginning his medical experiences of slum;
The jurors wound up the' weekmiddle and end. life in London. One of his most fa-
without calling any of the guards- I was fond of quoting one sen- mous novels, Of Human Bondage,
men who fired their weapons dur- tence from his notebook: "The sea is a largely autobiographical story
ing the confrontation with students, is shark-infested, and they say with of his early life with his clergyman
protesting U.S. military involve- a laugh that the sharks are the uncle and the bullying his stature
ment in Cambodia. best jailors." Typically, in 17 sim- , and stammer imposed upon him atr
An assistant Ohio attorney gen- ple words he had drawn a picture ' Kings School in Canterbury.
eral, Timothy Cotner, said those: that described a penal colony in At an early age he became a

Teamsters
continue
walkout
(Continued from Page 1)
a local supermarket noticed that
area stores "are using different
brands of foods than before the
strike." "But," she continued, "as
long as I can get the type of food
I want, I bould care less which
brand it is."
A STUDENT shopping at a local
store claimed the only produce he
was unable to find was a certain
brand of orange juice. "Other-
wise," he commented, "I notice no
difference at all."
Grocery store managers in the
area seem quite optimistic. "We
haven't had any supply problems
yet," one manager said.
Another manager, whose store
seemed harder hit than the others,
sees no indication that shoppers
are hoarding certain ipms in the
case of a food shortage. "People
are swinging with the strike," he
explained.
HE DID ADMIT that his stock
rooms were almost empty, while
such items as canned tuna fish,
canned vegetables and fresh pro-
duce were rapidly disappearing
from his shelves. "Supplies are
hol4ing up but I don't know for
how long," he said. "Everything is
up in the air.
i This WEEKEND
$2.50 - 8:30.
FRI.-SAT.
Folk Legacy Record's
NORMAN
KENNEDY

WANTED: for
Afro Literary Review:
Poetry, fiction, photography,
translations, drawings, etc.
Contributions must be accom-
panied by a stamped, self-address-
ed envelope.
Advertising rates available on
request. Send all manuscripts to
Mr. Fred Nelson Jr., 350 Thomp-
son, No. 106, or Chris, 1217
willard, No. 3, 665-0442.

Night Owl Film Festival
A WEEKLY LATE NIGHT
PRESENTATION OF
FEATURE FILMS
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
NIGHTS
ALL SEATS $1.50
OLIVER REED
VANESSA REDGRAVE
in
KEN RUSSEL'S
"THE DEVILS" (X
11 :15 P.M.

I

1i

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WOMEN'S INSTRUCTIONAL
POOL LEAGUE
Improve your game or learn it from scratch with
other women. Free instruction in the techniques
and tactics of the game. First meeting Wed., Jan.
30, 6:00 p.m.
MICHIGAN UNION BILLIARD ROOM

FIFTH FORUM
210 S. FIFTH AVE.
ANN ARBOR-761-9700

r

who fired would be called next
week. Cotner said all of the about
50 guardsmen questioned by the
jurors so far were what he called
nonshooters.

the tropics - obviously one of the successful playwright as well as
French ones - andsthe wry atti- novelist and quickly achieved at
tude of its inhabitants, least one of his ambitions - to{
Maugham, whether consciously make a great deal of money.
or unconsciously, was also an his- The other ambition was to use
Mrn Ufih d Plin dn fall of

torIan o T e aeci ne anu Lau i
WASHINGTON SOURCES said the British Empire. He travelled
Martin was the man who told Sen. widely in the Far East, noting his
Birch Bayh (D-Ind) that an under- acute observations of people and
cover agent on the campus had places..The gossip he heard, the
admitted firing his revolver sec- people he encountered, largely
onds before the guardsmen's out-' formed the plots of his hundreds of
burst of gunfire. Bayh, in urging short stories, the form in which he
the Justice Department to order a excelled above all others. He con-
grand jury hearing, speculated that ' fessed his original debt to that
the guardsmen's shots may have other great writer of the short
resulted from the agent's having story, Guy de Maupassant, and it is
fired his gun.' probable that, even if his novels
and plays are forgotten, Maugham
Terrence Norman, the man al- will always be regarded as one of
leged to have been an FBI agent the world's rare masters of the
and to have fired his revolver, has short story.
denied loosing any shots. He was a IN HIS DETACHED way hej
student and free-lance photographer wrote of the peccadillos of those
at the time and had "a press pass, who, in isolated outposts, were ad-
from the National Guard. He now ministering the widest empire the
is a policeman in Washington, D.C. world had ever known. Complete-
Norman testified during the first ly apolitical as he was, and with-
week of the current probe but re- out any-direct mention, he never-
fused to answer newsmen's ques- theless managed to conjure up in
the minds of his readers the at-
tions about his session with the mosphere behind the story the
jurors. kneeling houseboys whispering to-
gether their contempt of the drunk-
MAJ. JOHN SIMONS, a chaplain en, red-faced Bwana or sahib and
with the 107th Cavalry, whose the little adulteries of the Mem-
Troop Gwas also 'involved in the sahib and, even beyond that, the

his writing as a cathartic - to rid
himself of the neuroses that his
unhappy childhood had built with-
in him. Whether in all his 90 years
he ever succeeded in this second
aim is doubtful. Certainly in old
age he was a pathetic figure -
arrogant, spiteful, and lonely.

"Our Thinking and Our.World"
a lecture on Christian Science
by JAMES SPENCER, C.S.B.
Tuesday, Jan. 29--8 pm.
Faculty Club Lounge,
Michigan Union
ALL ARE WELCOME

{ C4I' FUTURE WORLDS
LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS
RALPH, NADER
JAN. 29-3 p.m.-Adm. $1.00
HILL AUDITORIUM
TICKETS NOW ON SALE AT MICHIGAN
UNION TICKET DESK. ALSO AVAILABLE AT
THE DOOR.
Lecture starts promptly at 3:00 r

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"

6m

i

L4

lim

-d -
T R IP LE F E AT U RE
LUNCH & I
TEENAGE FANTASIES
DOUBLE FEATURE
HIGH SCHOOL DROP OUTS
POWER of LOVE
art&CNEMA3
STARTS WED, Jan. 30
"BEHIND THE GREEN DOOR"
1' I AII ,III

SGC Wants Students
for
University Committees
Classified Research Review Panel
Long-Range Planning
(budgetary committee)
Off ice of Student Services Policy Board
U. Cellar Board of Directors
Student Organizations Board
-ALSO-
Director of Student Organizations

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'ter

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NEW WORLD CINEMA SHOWCASE

Winner of 4 Academy Awards
PAU L N EWMAN
ROBERT REDFORD
(in the combo appearance that paved
the way to "THE STING")
AND
KATHERINE Ross-

.9
J9'
4('
K9
4c'
4K'
T9
T9
.9' +
.9'
5'>94
.9' 4
Wit"
4 T
:9
ID'
.9'
T9

-ij-

Scotish songs and stories
SAT.-2 P.M.
WORKSHOP-
FREE
141 Sill STREET
'741'ISA

shooting, said he was called to
testify Friday but wasn't taken
before the jury. He said he was
Simons said in a nationally tele-
vised newscast -in November 1970
that the situation wasn't\ bad
enough to warrant the guardsmen's
gunfire and that "someone fired;
without orders."
U

1 n71

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DAYDREAMS WANTED!
U-M Prof wants detailed de-
scriptions of daydreams of es-
cape, revenge, love, success, or
whatever you daydream.
For use in professional papers
and book.
Anonymous submissions accept-

II|

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ATTENTION
LS&A STUDENTS
Are you interested in justice and in becoming in-

BUTCH CASSIDY and the SUNDANCE KI

III

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