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January 09, 1974 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-09

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Wednesday, January 9, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Cambodian capital
faces new threats
from Communists

CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY

Nixon plans comeback

PHNOM PENH CAMBODIA ()
- Communist-led insurgents in-
tensified pressure yesterday on
the outer defensive perimeters
of Phnom Penh, striking from
north and south, field reports
said.
The insurgents opened a front
to the north, posing a new threat
to this capital of nearly t wv o
million. Large Khmer forceswal-
so were reported to the west
and northwest of the city.
UNITED STATES sources
termed it the first phase of a
dry season offensive with the ob-
jective a military takeover. But
they expressed belief government
forces would hold.
The insurgents have pushed to
within five miles of Phnom Penh
from the west and eight miles
from the north. U.S. sources said
the Khmer Rouge have 60 battal-
ions with a total strength of 18,-
000 men within a radius of 25
miles of Phnom Penh. T h e i r
total strength across Cambodia is
estimated at 150 battalions total-
ing 45,000 men.
Field reports said the insurg-
ents assaulted a governmentsbat-
talion of 300 men on the eastern
bank of the Bassac River n i n e
miles southeast of Phnom Penh
and encircled it. Cambodian navy'
gunboats and helicopter gunships I
were called in to relieve the gov-
ernment battalion.
THERE WAS no immediate
word on casualties.
The drive from the w e s t
appeared to have been contain-
ed for the time being. KhmerI
Rouge forces were reported toj
have sustained heavy losses in
that region and there were no
new reports of fighting.
Field sources said that to the
north of Phnom Penh, the insur-
gents attempted to abduct b e-
tween 400 and 500 families from
a village trapped in the battle
zone.Government artillery shel-
led the rebels and about 300 fam-
ilies managed to escape across
the Tonle Sap River, they added.
MILITARY SOURCES said in-
surgent reinforcements w e r a
coming down from the north via
boats in the swamps. They were
believed destined for the force of
up to 3,000 troops threatening
Phnom Penh from the west and
northwest.
The Cambodian command said
more than 3,000 government
troops with 75 armored vehicles
were converging from the north,
south and east, trying to surround
the Khmer Rouge.
$0
10$2.50

Verbal battles continued in Sai-
gon between the warring sides
of South Vietnam. The S c u t h
Vietnamese accused the V i e t
Cong of avoiding discussion of
war prisoner exchanges at a
meeting of the Joint Military
Commission. The Viet Cong said
Saigon "refused to discuss spe-
cific questions on the release of
prisoners."
SPOKESMEN for North a n d
South Vietnam disagreed over
U.S. Defense Secretary James
R. Schlesinger's recent state-
ment that it would be "highly
likely" that President Nixon
would ask Congress for author-
ity to provide U.S. tactical a i r
support if the North launched a
major assault against Saigon's
forces.
A spokesman for the North ac-
cused the U.S. of encouraging the
Saigon administration to plunge
"deeper into the route of military
adventure." A spokesman for the
South called Schlesinger's com-
ment "a discouragement f o r
Hanoi."

SAN CLEMENTE (P) - Presi-
dent Nixon marks his 61st birth-
day today ready to emerge from
a period of introspective seclu-
sion with a fresh effort to halt
the erosion of Watergate on his
presidency, senior aides say.
Several aides acknowledged in
interviews yesterday that the
strains of the past year have tak-
en a toll in Nixon's physical
vigor.
BUT THEY described him as
determined to lead the renewed
comeback campaign.
While still tentative, the cam-
paign's outline includes: - Giv-
ing Cabinet members more vis-
ible responsibilities in running
the government and in promoting
administration proposals. - Con-
tinued presidential stress on for-
eign affairs, with special em-
phasis on the Middle East peace
and international cooperation to
solve the energy crisis. - A
White House reorganization with
Vice President Gerald Ford as-
suming a broad role in congres-
sional and domestic affairs and
as a vigorous champion of Nixon
administration proposals.
Since arriving in California
Dec. 26, Nixon has spent hours
in the solitude of the second-

floor study of his oceanside villa,
reflecting on the torrent of events
that battered his administration
in the past year and working on
plans for the next year.
EVERY WHITE House official
interviewed used the word "de-
termined" to describe Nixon's
mood.
"He's not going to permit the
government, himself and the ex-
ecutive branch to become con-
sumed by Watergate," said one
adviser who sees the President
often and is a virtual mirror of
presidential attitudes.
"No president has ever gone
through a year of attack, or
pressure like this past one," he
added. "We've had a year of it,
and enough is enough. Let's move
on."
THE WORDS used by this of-
ficial echoed phrases Nixon re-
peated time and again during the
past year as he sought to over-
come Watergate's impact.
Another aide said Nixon is
"ready to hit the boards run-
ning" beginning with his State
of the Union message and budget,
both of which will reach Congress
later this month.
Although they occasionally dis-
cuss in private the possibility of
Nixon resigning, those aides
closest to him say they are cer-
tainhe will not quit the presi-
dency.
"I DON'T know how the hell
he's done it, but he's hanging in
there," said one staffer. "He's
Igoing to gut it out one way or
another, like a distance run-
ner."
To some of those around him,
Nixon has aged considerably in
the past year, with his face
growing more lined and his com-
plexion losing its healthy hue.
"I had never been conscious
of hiswagesbefore,' said one
Iaide who sees Nixon almost
daily. "Now I am."
iHIS DOCTORS say his health
is basically sound, but at least
one staff member said Nixon now
tires more easily than before.
"He is getting tired, but he can
pace himself he knows when
he is tired."
Last summer's bout with viral
pneumonia hit Nixon harder than
publicly disclosed, according to
one assistant who added: "He's
not one to complain or let on,
so it's hard to tell."
A chronic muscle problem in
h i s 1 o w e r back reportedly
plagues Nixon on occasion. A

New York osteopath who spe-
cializes in back trouble, Dr.
Kenneth Ryland, came to the
White House every week or so to
massage the President's back
until last year when Ryland's in-
come tax returns came under in-
vestigation.
THE BACK trouble was cited
by one aide as the reason for a
slight limp Nixon sometimes
displays. But the President's
health is a subject aides try to
skirt in conversations w i t h
outsiders.
SUMMITo
MEDICAL
CENTER
Free Pregnancy Testing
PROBLEM PREGNANCY
COUNSELING
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INFORMATION
Approved by
National Organization for
Woman IN.O.W.)
(313) 272-8450

LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO
GET A REALLY GOOD HAIRCUT
HAIRCUT HOUSE
BRIARWOOD MALL
{ unisex hair fashion1s
Nathan Kolender Larry Shultz
John Vargas Bill Jamison
BRING THIS AD FOR $1.00 DISCOUNT
PROJECT COMMUNITY
Child Care and Development Program
* For students wanting to do volunteer work in
child care centers and homes 6 or more hrs./wk.
* Course credit available in psychology, education
and A&D.
* Come into office or to Thurs. meeting to sign up.

e

ORIENTATION & PLACEMENT
JAN. 10-8 P.M.
FACULTY CLUB LOUNGE, 1st floor Union

Dollar value soars
in European markets

Coordinator: SKIP TAUBE M-F, 2-5 p.m.
2204 MICHIGAN UNION-763-3548

LONDON (P) - The U. S. dol-
lar made spectacular new gains
in most European money mar-
kets yesterday, hitting 11-month
highs in some centers.
The price of gold, meanwhile,
soared to an all-time high of
$130.50 an ounce, reflecting un-
certainty over the future value
of European currencies.
MOST ATTENTION, however,
focused on the dollar, which has
increased its value against lead-
ing European currencies by some
3 per cent in the past two days
alone.
The big spurt came Monday
after Japan in effect devalued
the yen about 7 per cent, raising
speculation that Europeans, too,
might let their currencies drop
against the dollar.
Dealers said money markets
were again very busy Tuesday,
but less chaotic. The dollar rose
to an all-time high in Italy at
637 lira, up from 629.5, and t6
its best levels in Holland, Bel-
gium and France since it was
devalued in February, 1973. The
People! Music! Food!
BACH CLUB
ANNOUNCES ITS
SPRING
ORGANIZATIONAL
MEETING
EVERYONE INVITED!
No musical knowledge needed.
Put your organizational
abilities to work!
NEEDED: poster artists,
cooks, poster hangers,
and people in general. If
you can breathe we con
use YOU!
Thurs., Jan. 10, 8 p.m.
E. Quad, Greene Lounge
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SERVED AFTERWARD
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FURTHER INFO 761-9578

dollar also rose in Japan Tues-
day.
BUT THE U.S. currency eased
off in Britain and Germany, fol-
lowing its biggest advance of the
year in both countries Monday.
Dealers said some technical set-
back had been expected. In ad-
dition, dealers said the Bank of
England intervened Tuesday to
buy pounds and keep the dollar
from rising further. There were
mixed reports of state bank in-
tervention in Germany, too.
The over-all trend, however,
continued to be a strongly re-
covering dollar. The U. S. cur-
rency had lost some 20 per cent
of its value in Europe, floating
down between the February de-
valuation and last July when it
began to turn around on improv-
ing U. S. foreign trade figures.

gg o J95% 999999
BOO SALE I
ALL PAPERBACKS REDUCED 10-50%
ALL CLOTH BOOKS REDUCED 20-50%
EVERY BOOK IN THE STORE ON SALE
LIMITED TIME ONLY ALL SALES FINAL
OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY (13 volumes) was 300.00 now 239.95
DALI COOKBOOK ...... . .. . ........ was 50.00 now 25.00
NICKEL MOUNTAIN
(John Gardner's newest novel).............was 6.95 now 4.95
VICTOR VASARELY-PLANETARY FOLKLORE was 15.00 now 10.50
THE BARN was 25.00 now 20.00
PLAIN SPEAKING
(Harry Truman and Merle Miller)......was 8.95 now 7.16
M THOUSANDS OF OTHER BARGAINS
NO REMAINDERS NO PUBLISHERS' OVERSTOCK
Centi~core Bookshops
336 MAYNARD only
$$ C$, t-G. $

Help Wanted
The LSA Student Government will be
appointing student members to the
following College Commitees:
Administrative Board (2)
Admissions Committee (2)
Curriculum Committee (1)
Policy Committee (2)
Academic Judiciary (3)
LSA Executive Council (1)
Interviews will held on
SUNDAY, JANUARY 13th
SIGN UP AT 3M, MICHIGAN UNION,
763-4799, BY NOON SUNDAY

M I
M'
I'i
i
l
I
t
I
i
,j
I
M
t
M

I

FRI.-SAT.

A Musical Party
with
Ed Trickell
and the
Golden Ring
(RUTH MEYER,
dulcimer virtuoso
believe it or not;
HARRY TUFT, guitar;
BOB COLTMAN, fiddle;
PENNY TRICKETT)

Schedule
of Weeks:

JAN.-

18-20-Pat Sky
25-26-Norman
Kennedy
31-Tracy Schwartz

FEB.-

1-3-Norman Blake
8-10-Michael Cooney
11-Alice Seeger &
Hazel Kickens
15-16-Putnam String
Country Band w/
John Cohen
910 01_o sn- Phe ...

I

E

III

I

I

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