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January 24, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-24

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Thursday, January 24, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

vase t-ive

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I~'6nA Hv~

iReel

World'

stars

women's

By MARNIE HEYN
Friends of Newsreel will pre-
sent a benefit showing of Jean-
Luc Godard's Weekend this Fri-
day night as a kickoff fund-
raiser for Women in the Reel
World, the women's film festival
to be held on campus February
6 through 10.
Billed as a "non-competitive
film festival," Women is open to
any film made by women, re-
gardless of length or subject mat-
ter.
The festival, which is free and
open to the public, will be held
in the Physics and Astronomy
Bldg., Aud. E. The University
mini-course "Women and Film,"
taught by Marvin Felheim of the
English Department and Dorothy
McGuigan of the Center for Con-
tinuing Education of Women, is
part of the festival.
Films to be shown at the festi-
val will cover all eras of film-
making, from the turn of the cen-
tury to the present, in order to
expose the full range of women's
creativity in this medium.
Film workshops such as "Fem-
inist Film Criticism," "Women
as Artists," and "Political Film-
making" are featured during the
five-day film marathon. Brother
Carl, a film by Susan Sontag, Mai
Zetterling's The Girls, and Leon-
tine Sagan's Maedchen in Uni-
form will be presented and dis-
cussed.
Among film-makers who will
appear at the festival is Shirley
Clarke, who will perform a video-

tape "happening," and discuss
her film. Other guests include
filmmaker Julia Reichert, who
produced Growing Up Female,
film critic Julia Lesage, and
Marjorie Rosen, author of Pop-
corn Venus.
Organizers of Women in the
Reel World expect that women
from such groups as the Twin
Cities Film Collective, the Madi-
son Women's Film Collective,
Videopolis of Chicago and New
York's Women Make Movies
will be a stimulating and infor-
mative part of the festival.
Coordinator Alice Steinicke ex-
plains why she feels that a total-
ly "made by women" film fes-
tival is important:
"The Women's studies Pro-
gram has been encouraged to
present Women in the Reel
World through its awareness of
other "women and film" festi-
vals throughout the country for
the past several years. Ann Ar-
bor is an appropriate place to

have the festival as it is a strong
film community.
"I feel th at Women is import-
ant because its focus is on wo-
men as artists. Lots of other fes-
tivals have examined the image
or role of women in men's films,
but we are concentrating on
films made by women.
"As a woman working in me-
dia, I need the stimulation of
seeing films made by women,
of seeing their art."
Festival sponsors include, in
addition to the Women's Studies

films
Program, Student Government
Council, LSA Student Govern-
ment, Rackham Student Govern-
ment, the English Department,
the Center for Continuing Edu-
cation of Women, President
Fleming, and the New Morning
Media Cooperative.
Those who are interested in
supporting Women in the Reel
World can do by attending the
Weekend benefit, or by purchas-
ing festival T-shirts at the New
Morning Bookstore.

ALL-CAMPUS TG
AT
THETA XI
.1345 Washtenaw near South Univ.
Friday-Jan. 25
begins at 9:00 p.m.
(ladies admitted free)
Live Band-MEDUSABE

SEER

i i

.ARTS

ISRAELI LITERATURE
at War and at Peace
a lecture by
DR. WARREN BARGAD
Prof. Hebrew Language and Literature
Hebrew Union College
THURSDAY, Jan. 24-8:00 p.m.
at H I LLEL, 1429 Hill St.

-room" I

Doily Photo by TOM GOTTLIEB

WABX Air Waves:
Mahavishnu splitting?

603 E. LIBERTY * DIAL 665-6290
ENDS TODAY! Walter Matthau & Bruce Dern in
"THE LAUGHING POLICEMAN" (R) at 1, 3, 5,
-STARTS TOMOR ROW!-
"TERRIFIC"
-Conby, N.Y. Times
"SLEEPER OF THE CENTURY!"
--R. Von Winkle, Hudson Volley Dormitory
"Clearly the work of a Comic Genius"
-Newsday

By WABX
T h e Mahavishnu Orchestra
may have played its last concert
December 30th at the Masonic
Auditorium.
Reports of a breakup have not
been denied by the group'sman-
ager, Nat Weiss. "As of this mo-
ment" he said, "they are consid-
ering a different personnel for
the Mahavishnu Orchestra in the
future. But nothing is final."
The Orchestra consists of John
McLaughlin, Jan Hammer, key-
board Player, Jerry Goodman,
violinist, Rick Laird, bassist, and
Billy Cobham, drummer.
McLaughlin is exploring other
dimensions of music that would
require different instrumentation.
A live album of McLaughlin's re-
cent tour with Carlos Santana
will be released in March.
A proposed piece of legislation
in England could have a far-
reaching effect on the kinds of
rock music in the future. Under
the provisions of the bill, any
kind of "indecent display" whe-
ther in actual performance,
lyrics, or graphic promotions,

would be illegal.
British music critics say that
the bill would directly affect per-
formers like Mick Jagger, not
only for his lyrics, but for his be-
havior on stage as well.
Despite remarks made recently
by both John Lennon and Paul
McCartney, Ringo Starr says
that a possible Beatles reunion
is "silliness." Ringo says that
rumors of the Beatles' regroup-
ing were created by his recent
record which featured all four of
the ex-Beatles on various tracks.
In the meantime, both John
and Paul have indicated that the
Beatles just might get together
for a "one time thing." George
Harrison has made no comments
on the subject in recent months.
Rick Wakeman of Yes will re-
cord his second live solo album
in London. The London Sym-
phony Orchestra will join him
for a production of Jules Verne's
"Journey To The Center Of The
Earth." Seven other rock musi-
cians, will also perform.
Wakeman will play a variety
of keyboard instruments, includ-

ing the mellotron, synthesizers,
and a huge electric organ which
cost $10,000.
Billy Jean King has announced
that she is assembling a maga-
zine staff, and will begin pub-
lishing America's first sports
magazine for women, beginning
next May. The name of her new
magazine will be "Women-
Sports."
The tennis star said that most
existing sports magazines are
sexist, or are editorially weak
when they cover women's sports.
The people who promoted last
summer's big Watkins Glen Rock
Festival are planning another
festival this year. The festival
will occur sometime around Me-
morial Day, on the West Coast.
The Jefferson Airplane's lead
singer, Grace Slick, will release
her first solo album in February.
One side features a 20-minute
piece called "Theme From The
Movie Manhole." Grace plays pi-
ano and Spanish guitar, recreat-
ing great movie themes from
Hollywood's golden era.
The rock band Santana has
announced a major American
concert tour, due to start early
in 1974.
NEWS RELEASES: Look for a
new album from Carole King
coming out in February or
March . . . Lou Reed will have
a live album out soon, titled
"Rock 'N Roll Animal"
Mott the Hoople recorded their
two concerts in England for a
live album, to be released later
in 1974. A studio album will pre-
sent it as a follow-up to the
"Mott" album . . . vocalist Lee
Thomas who has sung with mu-
sicians fromCountsBasie to Pha-
roan Sanders, has now joined
Santana. He's also on their gold
record "Welcome" album.
Joe Cocker is working on an-
other album in London. Melody
Maker reports that Cocker re-
corded eight tracks in December
for an untitled new album.

"My Brother Is

Funny"
an Allen, Radiation News

I."

Drania~cxt c It
Rich, rd Frpnk and Judy Levitt experience dramatic hilhs as David and Jenny in the musical COM-
PANY. Civic Theater's producgion of Stephen Sondheim's Tony winner plays Wednesday through Sun-
day at Mendelssohn Theater.
oin The Dailv
41F FUTURE WORLDS
LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS
HIGHRISE &RAHN
TEENAGE FANTASIES
JAN. 29-3 p.m.--Adm. $1.00
DOUBLE FEATURE
HIGH SCHOOL DROP OUTS HILL AUDITORIUM
PO WER of LOVE TICKETS NOW ON SALE AT MICHIGAN
UNION TICKET DESK. ALSO AVAILABLE AT
STARTS WED, Jon. 30 THE DOOR
"BEHIND THE GREEN DOOR"
' - 1 1 (Lecture starts promptly at 3:00
I I

Band' displays true
McCartney talents

By DOUG ZERNOW .
McCartney seems to have got-
ten himself together musically
for his fifth album since the
Beatle's breakup. After a string
of disappointing solo Lp's and a
haphazard attempt at establish-
ing a new group, his Band on the
Run is a long-awaited exposition
of the true McCartney talents.
Possibly the best produced al-
bum of 1973, it is a mixture of
many different sounds and influ-
ences, from early Beatles to
Reggae, yet all the songs deal
with, in one way or another, Mc-
Cartney's conception of fast
paced, modern life, particularly
life on the road.
In "Mrs. Vandebilt", he says:
What's the use of worrying?
What's the use of hurrying?
What's the use of anything?
expressing rather bluntly an idea
which runs through most of the
album, that of an abandonment
of responsibility. McCartney
sings about nature on "Bluebird"
and "Mamunia," and there's
even some drunken choruses and
other typically Beatle humor on
"Picasso's Last Words."
The sound is pure, overdubbed

McCartney with Paul playing ev-
erything from drums to synthe-
sizer, former Wings member
Denny Laine around for some
rhythm work and Linda McCart-
ney on some much improved
background vocals.
Overall, Band on the Run is
a polished and solid perform-
ance, a long way from what
George Harrison once called
"this bip-bop crap" of the first
Wings album. Thanks Paul.

'WVo dy q'iLe
in
SHOWN DAILY AT 1, 3, 5, 7, & 9 P.M.
Box office open at 12:45

V1
L

-"" "

4
...
ti 4 } 'r,
g

Bar-Restaurant
and Riding Club
READY OR NOT
Open
Thursday!
11 A.M.-2 A.M.
Corner of Forest
and South University

DIAL 668-6416
ty
1214 soutb THE
University URUSTI

SAT., SUN.,
WED.
SHOWS AT
1,3,5
7, 9 P.M.
MON. & TUES.
AT 7& 9
ONLY
OPEN DAILY
12:45.

LU

NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP presents:

Dalton Trumbo's'

TONIGHT!

SHOWS
3, 5, 7 &

AT 1,
9 P.M.

JOHNNY GOT HIS GUN

231 S. State

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