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January 20, 1974 - Image 8

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Michigan Daily, 1974-01-20

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Page Eight

4
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, January 20, 19711

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, January 20, 1 97~'i

fullcourt

Kupec's

basket

Russell and Hairston

trips
(Continued from Page 1)
for a hugging session. But on Spar-
tan mentor Gus Ganakas, it pro-
duced one of the longest faces seen
recently in ICrisler.
From Orr's point of view, it was
"just one hell of a game." For
Ganakas, it was "a real shame
that a team that has worked as
hard and come as far as we have
has to lose like this."
But for hero Kupec it was "a

up

. ..0

. recover from publicity
By JIM ECKER
YESTERDAY'S BALLGAME produced an instant hero in burly
C.J. Kupec. The mobile 6-8 center's well-timed jumper
capped an exhilarating afternoon during which 11,734 Crisler
Arena patrons received abundant recompense for missing out
on the televised Battle of South Bend. But this piece doesn't
concern Kupec, his shot, or Notre Dame's stunning victory.
The subject here is "Lindsay and Campy."
Three years ago, a couple of guys named Hairston and
Russell graduated from high school. Between them, they had
amassed a plethora of All-Everything honors, raving press
notices, an avalanche of college scholarship offers, and legions
of admirers. There was some talk the two talented ballplayers
might just skip college ball and take their prolific skills to the
pros.
But once all the brouhaha and hysterical speculation
had ended, Hairston had enrolled at Michigan State and
Russell at Michigan. Both waltzed through their rookie
campaigns as freshmen stifled from a lack of varsity-level
competition. In their initial collegiate showdown that year,
Russell's crew outlasted Hairston's playmates in a wild
shoot-out at Jennison Fieldhouse which left the state's basket-
ball fans panting anxiously for the '72-73 season to begin.
With Hairston and Russell playing varsity ball, Michigan
State and Michigan both saw themselves blessed with magnetic
drawing cards and solid hopes for winning ballclubs.
But it wasn't to be. Russell anguished through an excru-
ciating sophomore year during whichhedandHenry Wilmore
never got it together as an effective working combination.
The Wolverines started strong, but rapidly floundered, sput-
tered and died, finishing a bitterly disappointing 6-8 in the
Big Ten.
Up in East Lansing, Hairston experienced trouble making
a drastic overhaul in his game. He was suddenly no longer a
cat-quick center dominating plodding high school pivotman.
MSU Coach Gus Ganakas employed the towering Detroit -Ket-
tering product at forward with Bill Kilgore in the middle.
Hairston found the matchups tougher, his opponents
faster, and the ball further from the hoop. Also, with in-
cumbent conference scoring champion and prolific shooter
Mike Robinson around, the old hardcourt dilemna of playing
with, only one basketball took its toll on Hairston's output.
By any standards, he did not shine.
What a difference a year makes. Hairston currently leads
the Big Ten in rebounding and averages a solid 15.5 points per
game. Russell is the recognized leader of this Michigan team
which has confounded the "experts" by capturing national
recognition and seriously contending for the conference crown.
Yesterday's ballgame wasn't one of Campy's best efforts,
although it is a testimony to his individual brilliance that an
"off" day can produce 27 points, 10 rebounds and 8 assists.
"His timing wasn't good in the first half," pinpointed Mich-
igan Coach John Orr. "He wasn't jumping well or getting good
. arc on the ball. But he did some fantastic things in the second
half, didn't he?" gushed Orr.
That he did. The Wolverines looked for Russell in the
second stanza, and Russell responded to the pressure and
responsibility. Moving with more confidence and authority,
the junior co-captain drilled in a series of lengthy jumpers,
grabbed some big rebounds, and passed effectively. In one
memorable combination, Russell skied high for a defensive
carom, spied Wayman Britt dashing downcourt, and fired a
three-quarter-court bullet to the streaking Britt for an un-
molested lay-in.
In all, Russell canned 22 of Michigan's 45 pressure-packed
second half points before fouling out with 14 seconds remaining.
Hairston played a more consistent game, both in scorig
and in rebounding. Of the eight Spartans employed by Coach
Ganakas' revolving substitution system, only Hairston never left
the court. The 6-7, 186-pound thin man grabbed 15 of 'Michigan
State's 38 rebounds yesterday, felled 9 of 13 floor shots, dropped
- ,of 6 charity tosses, and proved the 'focal point of the Spartans'
ballgame.
According to Orr, "Lindsay Hairston is one of the finest
post men a r o u n d, anywhere." C.J. Kupec, who battled
UCLA's Bill Walton just three weeks ago, came out of the
Michigan State affair impressed with the Spartan pivot-
man's abilities.
Ganakas attributes Hairston's improved play to maturity.
"He's more confident this year," he noted. "Also, he's got a
lot more experience this year. That's important."
For, Hairston, it's confidence and experience. For Russell,
it's a chrystalized team position combined with added respon-
sibilities. For both, this basketball season has returned a

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITORS:
MARC FELDMAN
CLARKE COGSDILL

MS
life. But the Spartans kept out-
hustling Michigan and their fast
breaks gradually produced an 11-
point, 70-59 MSU lead with less
than seven minutes left.
At that point, though, the Mich-
igan defense finally began to jell
and halted the Spartan charge.
Meanwhile, Campy really began to
smoke and started drilling in jump-
shot after 20-foot jumpshot. The
Wolverines outscored the Spartans

shot I'll remember as long as I standoff. The Spartans' team speed 12-2 in a two-minute stretch to
live." and quickness along with their make the game close and set the
. run-and-shoot style of play brought stage for the final three-minute
DESPITE THE storybook finish, Michigan out of its normal game. scramble.
the game was not one of the best Only Joe Johnson, who did a su- Russell was the game's leading
Michigan has played this year. perb job on Mike Robinson, the scorer, hitting 27, 22 of them in
"We weren't really ready," Orr Big Ten's leading scorer for the the second stanza, and added eight
admitted. The contest see-sawed last two years, was playing strong assists. Kupec finished with 20,
back and forth throughout and had defense. Russell looked completely shooting a phenomenal nine-for-12,
the game been a few seconds uninspired. mostly from the outside. Steve
longer or shorter the verdict might Only a Michigan zone press in Grote chipped in 14, and Britt, who
have been different. the last five minutes of the half had a big role in the Michigan
The first half was a virtual saved the Wolverines and turned comeback, added 13.
k'or MS TT_-l - rst.n.score.7A,

y

Kupec Klincher
MICHIGAN

a 33-26 Spartan margin into a 39-371
Michigan halftime lead.
THE BEGINNING of the second
half saw a change in the game as
both Russell and Robinson, the
teams' big guns, finally came to

For MSU, Hairston scored 23,
grabbed 15 rebounds, blocked sev-
eral shots, and generally made a
strong showing. Robinson poured
in 17 in the second half to finish
with 21.

Russell
Britt
Kupec
Johnson
Grote
Worrell
Rogers
TEAM
Totals
Breslin
Furlow
Hairston
Robinson
Glover
Davis
McGill
Wilson
TEAM
Totals

FiG FT R F TP
9-21 9-12 10 5 27
6-11 1-2 8 3 13
9-12 2-2 9 3 20
3-12 0-0 3 5 6
6-15 2-4 3 1 14
1-3 0-0 0 0 2
1-3 0-1 1 1 2
10
35-79 14-21 44 18 84

i
E
a

Mat machine' erupts;
blanks Indiana, 39-0

MICHIGAN
FG
1-4
4-10
9-13
9-14
6-10
3-5
2-3
2-2

STATE
FT R
2-2 1
0-0 5
5-6 15
3-6 4
0-0 2
0-0 2
0-2 1
0-0 0
6- a

F TP
5 4
2 8
3 23
2 21
3 12
1 6
S 4
1 4
21 82
45-84
45-82

36-61 10-16 38

Doily Photo by STUART HOLLANDER
JUMPING SPARTAN Edgar Wilson (33) plays the tough defense against Wolverine Chuck Rogers
(53) in the first half of yesterday's come-from-behind Michigan victory over the feisty farmers, 84-82.

IHGSCORE BY PERIODS39
MICHIGAN 39
MSU 37
A-11,734

Icers
By BRIAN-DEMINGi
Special To The Daily
MADISON-Two injuries in the
opening period provided the im-
petus to turn the scoring around
and spell doom for the Michigan'
hockey team as the Wisconsin
Badgers came from a two-goal t
deficit to beat the Wolverines 6-3 F
here last night. i
With the Maize and Blue up 3-1 t
with 3:44 left in the opening per- g
iod, goalieeRobbie Moore was car-V
ried off the ice with a minor con- t
cussion. Apparently Badger Don
DePrez, after being shoved into l
the crease, inadvertently knocked r
N
Tan11Ike i
By BILL CRANE
The Michigan swim team re-
discovered "winning" yesterday
afternoon, defeating Michigan
State 66-57 in a Big Ten dual
meet at Matt Mann Pool. Mich-
igan State never really threaten-
ed even though Michigan Coach
Gus Stager juggled his swimmers
in an attempt to look at some
relatively inexperienced people.
THE VICTORY came after a
tough meet with Stanford Fri-
day evening and now the tankers
look forward to a long-awaited
day off-their first since Christ-
mas.

bow

to

Ba dge rs

By CARY FOTIASl
The ,Michigan wrestling program'
celebrated its 50th anniversary yes-
terday as the Wolverine matmen
blanked a young Indiana squad
39-0 at. Crisler Arena.'
Dave Curby registered the only
oin of the day, flattening Hoosier'
Bob Pell with 35 seconds remaining
in their meet-ending 190-pound con-
test. Curby was leading Pell 16-0
when he finally put him away.
Jim Brown got the Wolverines
off on the right track at 118 pounds
by gaining a superior decision over
Indiana's John Hobbs. The Akron,
Ohio junior led only 3-0 after thel
first two periods, but turned it on
in the final stanza to win 17-1.
Rich Valley, who had missed
Michigan's last two dual meets
with an injury, made his return to
the lineup at 126 a success by
downing Craig Mann, 3-0.
Bill Davids, 1973 Big Ten cham-
pion at 126, bested Hoosier Marty
Hutsell 6-1 in their 134-lb. match.
Bill I hk f llowed with an 8-3

by reversing his Indiana opponent
midway through the final period
enroute to a 5-2 decision.
Rob Huizenga accounted for
Michigan's third superior decision
of the afternoon, racking up a 10-
0 first period edge and generally
doing what he wanted in an 18-2
triumph.
Heavyweight Gary Ernst won by
forfeit because Forrest Gray, his
scheduled opponent, was sidelined
by a shoulder separation suffered
in the Hoosiers' 22-19 victory over
Western Michigan Friday night.
The shutout was the second of
the year for Michigan and left the
Wolverines with a 3-0 conference
mark.
Gymnasts
beat SIU

Moore in the head with a stick..
Starting goaltender Dick Perk-
ins of Wisconsin left the game a
few minutes before, reportedly
with an ankle injury after giv-
ing up three goals.
These two injuries seemed to
urn the game around as the,
Badgers came back with four goals
n the second period and one in the
hird while replacement Badger'
goalie Mike Dibble shut out the
Wolverines for the remainder of
the night.
"It wasn't nearly the game of
ast night," coach Dan Farrell re-1
marked, adding, however, that he
EW FACES SHINE
battei
Individual standouts for Mich-
igan yesterday included some
new faces. Rob Bauman won the
200 yard individual medley and
also placed second in the 200
yard butterfly. Brad Brockway
placed second in the 200 yard
breaststroke and Mark Anderson
turned in a stellar victory in the
500 yard freestyle.
Norm Semchyshen turned in a
fine time in the 200 yard free-
style. A tired Tom Szuba won
the 200 yard backstroke, and was
replaced by some of his team-
mates in other events.'
DICK QUINT turned in a
clutch performance for coach

' was satisfied with the split.
Michigan was first to get on the
scoreboard as Gary Morrison spot-
ted a rebound and slapped it past
Perkins for the score at 4:45 in the
initial period.
Coach Bob Johnson's Badgers
tied it up at 6:25 when Dean Tala-
fous skated around and through the
shorthanded Michigan defense and
shoved the puck into the twines
behind Moore.!
The Maize and Blue respondedj
at 9:50 on a power play. Pat,
Hughes, the speedy freshman
forward, put on a superb display
of stickhandling, skated the puck
Dick Kimball's diving team. Af-
ter winning both diving events
Friday 'night against Stanford
with some superior dives, Quint
won the three meter event yes-
terday. He quipped that after
"putting those dives together I
got kind of excited."
The team goes against Purdue
next Friday evening at Matt
,Mann Pool.
400 YD MEDLEY - (M) Hansen,
Bauer, Bauman, Stevens, 3:38.24.
1000 YD FREESTYLE - (M) Bauer,
J., 10:07.68.
200 YD FREESTYLE - (M) Semehy-
shen, 1:46.54.
50 YD FREESTYLE - (MSU) Hensen,
:21.61.
200 YD INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY -
(M) Bauman, 2:02.33.
ONE METER DIVE - (MSU) Cook.
200 YD BUTTERFLY - (MSU) Brad-
ford, 2:02.26.
100 YD FREESTYLE-(MSU) Wright,
47.72.
200 YD BACKSTROKE - (M) Szuba,
s1:57.11.
500 YD FREESTYLE - (M) Anderson,
4:56.11.
THREE METER DIVE - (M) Quint.
200 YD BACKSTROKE - (MSU)
Holmes, 2:15.36.
400 YD FREESTYLE RELAY - (MSU)
Hensen, Disoway, Hall, wright, 3:16.25.
Reserves
trip State
By JOHN KAHLER

around to the left of the goal,s
and beat Perkins with his shot.
Michigan repeated at 13:34 whenI
Rob Palmer niade. a backhanded]
pass to Don Dufek who pushed it
home fromn five feet out.
But that was the last time Mich-,
igan lit the red light. Despite be-
ing outshot 22-18 for the remain-]
der of the game, Wisconsin took]
over the scoring.
Two goals by Dave Arundel andj
a goal apiece by Dave Pay and
Billie Reay (son of the coach of
the Chicago Black Hawks) sent
Wisconsin to the locker room after
the end of the second period with
a 5-3 lead.
"Bowling Green doesn't shoot
the puck the way these guys do,"
remarked Butch Wagner about his
first experience against a WC{A'
team. .
Wagner, however, came back in
the third period and held the'
Badgers to a single goal in actiont
that was marred by numerous
roughing penalties.
"They played our kind of game,"
commented defenseman Tom Lind-
skog a f t e r the hard-checking
Badgers beat the Blue dekers and
sent the squad home with a split.

I
I
i

verd bcn ictn wBb uorILss, adld-special To The Daily
verdict over Bob Morriss and de- CARBONDALE-Michigafn's gym-
fending NCAA 150-yomnd champion, nasts enjoyed a fine afternoon
Jerry Hubbard made the team yesterday- as t h e y outtumbled
score 17-0 by drubbing Dan Wiley, Southern Illinois 160.1 to 156.45 in
13-2. a dual meet.
The next two matches were the Jean Gagnon, who had a career
day's closest. Dan Brink scored a high of 52.02 in the all-around,
crucial takedown with 20 seconds starred for the Michigan team.
to go in the second period and went Gagnon, along with teammate J.P.
on to defeat Jerome Stewart, 4-2. Bouchard, captured first place in
John Ryan, a graduate of Detroit the floor exercise with 9.05 points.
Catholic Central, t h e n broke a The rings seem to have the out-
2-2 deadlock with Ken Kalcevich standing scorers this year as Mich-
igan garnered 27.35 points. The
Hoosiers goosed Salukis' Jack Laurie copped first
place with a spectacular 9.4 while
118-Jim Brown (M) sup. dec.' John Michigan's J o e Neuenswander
1Hobbs (i), 17-1 (9.3) and captain Monty Falb (9.25)
126-Rich valley (M) dec. Craig pae eodadtid
Mann (1), 3-0. placed second and third.
134-Bill Davids (M) dec. Marty Hut- As usual, Michigan dominated
sell (I), 6-1. vaulting in finishing first, second,
142-Bill Schuck (M) dec. Bob Morris and third. Pierre LeClerc came in
150-Jerry Hubbard (M) sup. dec. Dan first (9.2) followed by Gagnon
Wiley (1), 13-2. (9.05) and Rich Bigras (9.0).
158-Dan Brink (M) dee. Jerome In the high bars, Gagnon cap-
Stewart (I), 4-2.tared first and teammates Bob
167-John Ryan (M) dec. Ken Kal-tue fisan tam tsBo
cevich ( y), 5-2. Darden and Cary Culbertson tied
177-Rob Huizenga (M) sup. dec. for second.
Mike Sheehan (1), 18-2. Jerry Poynton and LeClerc each
190-Dave Curby (M) pinned Bob Peil placed second in thepommel horse
(1), 7:25.(yacdpseondis te pommely.
Hwt,-Gary, Ernst (M) won by forfeit.° and parallel bars respectively.

measure of the "old"
Michigan basketball.

days when Lindsay and Campy dominated

SOUTH BEND 01) - G u a r d
Dwight Clay hit from the right
corner with 28 seconds remain-
ing, capping a surge of 12
straight points and leading No.
2-ranked Notre Dame to a 71-70
victory over top-ranked UCLA
yesterday in a college basketball
showdown, ending the Bruins'
record winning streak at 88
games.
Notre Dame trailed 70-59 with'
3:30 remaining in the game, but
began their string on two quick
baskets by junior center John
Shumate, the second coming af-
ter he stole an in-bounds pass.
Freshman Adrian Dantley then
stole another UCLA pass and
went half the length of the court
for a layup.
Gary Brokaw, who led Notre
Dame with 25 points, then con-
verted two straight short jump-
ers around a pair of UCLA er-
rors, making it 70-69 with 1:10
left.
UCLA forward Keith Wilkes
then dumped in a layup with 45
seconds remaining, but was call-
ed for walking and the basket
was disallowed.

topples

UCLA

Dekers' disaster,
FIRST PERIODI
SCORING: 1. Michigan - Morrison
(Fox Moretto) 4:45; 2. Wisconsin - Tal-
afous (Arundel, Taft), ppg., 6:25; 3.
Michigan - Hughes (T. Lindskog, Far-1
dig), ppg., 9:50; 4.. Michigan - Dufek
(Palmer, Paris) 13:34.
SECOND PERIOD
5. Wisconsin - Arundel (Olmstead)
2:41; 6. Wisconsin - Pay (Alley, Tala-l
fous) 4:50; 7. Wisconsin - Reay (Olm-
stead, Taft) 10:29; 8. Wisconsin - Arun-
del (Talafous, Alley) ppg. 15:20.
THIRD PERIOD
9. Wisconsin - Pay (Talafous, Eng-
blom), ppg., 5:23.
DAYDREAMS WANTED!
U-M Prof wants detailed de-
scriptions of daydreams of es-
cape, revenge, love, success, or
whatever you daydream.
For use in professional papers
and book.
Anonymous submissions accept-
ed.

~qI

UCLA superstar Bill Walton
then tried a short jumper from
the side of the basket, missing
for only the third time in 15
attempts during the game. Tips
by UCLA forward Pete Trgovich
and Dave Meyers failed and
Shumate got the rebound as the
clock ran out.
Walton, whose playing status
was in doubt until only moments
before the game because of a
back injury that had kept him
out of three games, scored 12
points in each half, leading the
Bruins with 24 points.
Wilkes, struggling much of the
game against the burly Notre
Dame front. line, still managed
18 points.
Shumate, held to eight points
in the first half, finished with
24 for the Irish. Clay, the hero
of the game, wound up with only
sevenhpoints,hitting only two of
five shots from the floor.'
* * *
Riveters romp
WEST LAFAYETTE OP)-Pur-
due's one-two punch of Frank
Kendrick and John Garrett-

.._

picked up 19 points, 10 coming
in the first half. Garrett fouled
out with 3:30 to play.
The victory gives Purdue a 4-0
conference record and sets up
Monday's showdown battle at
West Lafayette with fellow un-
beaten Michigan.
* * *
Gophers gouged
COLUMBUS (1P) - Minnesota
made 21 straight free throws yes-
terday, but Bill Andreas' 24
points paced Ohio State to an
81-77 Big Ten basketball victory
over the Gophers.,
Ohio State had six more field
goals than Minnesota. However,
the oGphers stayed in contention
with their 21-for-21 at the charity
line.
* * *
Badgers blast
By BRIAN DEMING
Special To The Daily
MADISON-Before an excited
crowd of 9,173, the Wisconsin
Badgers smashed Illinois 101-75
under the antique rafters of the
Tc'nnCin MPHH use here ve-

Inept passing and the inability to
dribble the ball through the press
led to countless Illini turnovers,
to the delight of the local par-
tisans.
* * *
Iowa humbled
IOWA CITY (P)-Indiana used
an Iowa scoring drought and
some late free throw shooting to
edge the Hawkeyes. 55-51 in Big
Ten basketball action last night.
The Hoosiers rallied from a 48-
42 deficit by holding Iowa to
three points during the final six
minutes, 47 seconds of the con-
test.
,. Big Ten Standings

Park West Galleries
ANNOUNCES
AN
artauction
SUNDAY, JANUARY 20 AT 2 P.M.
exhibit starting at 1 p.m.
at
HOLIDAY INN WEST
2900 Jackson Road-Ann Arbor, Michigan
LITHOGRAPHS 0 ETCHINGS 0 SERIGRAPHS * DRAWINGS
" PAINTINGS " WATERCOLORS " POSTERS, etc. Featuring
hand signed graphics pulled from editions limited to from 10
to 300,
ARTISTS REPRESENTED INCLUDE:
Albers 4 Appel * Anuskiewicz 0 Braque 0 Boulanger * Buffet
" Calder . Cezanne 0 Chagall40 Doli 0 Friedloender *Gat
" Giacometti 0 Goya " Hwang 0 Jonsem @ Lautrec * Liberman
" Lindner Nieman 0 Marini 0 Max 0 Matisse * Miro
" Picasso " Reuben " Renoir " Silva 0 Vasarely " and many
others.
Catalogues available during preview. (All art absolutely guaran-
teed to be genuine as described.)

W L Pct.
4 0 1.000

The Michigan Varsity Reserve:
basketball team stretched its rec-
ord to 6 and 0 by defeating the
Michigan State reserves 72-61 in
ran encounter yesterday at Crisler L
Arena. The win did not come eas- I-
f ily-MSU gave the V.R.'s their
toughest game of the year.
. State roared out to an 11-4 lead
ithe early going. The Baby Blue!
rolled back, but it was obvious
that the Wolverines were not mov-
1 ing the ball on offense as well as,
they have in the past. They man-:
aged to catch up, though, and led
28-27 at the half.
Scott Mason and Kent Storey,

Daydream questionnaire avail-
able for those who wish full
participation.
WRITE TO-
Dr. John Hartman
C-7264 University Hospital.
Ann Arbor, Michigan
48104

Park West Galleries

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FOURTH PROGRAM
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BERT COURTE, viola; JEROME JELINEX, cello; NELSON HAUENSTEIN, flute; JOHN MOH-
LER, clarinet; ARNO MARIOTTI,coboe; MARILYN MASON, harpsichord; JOHN KOLLEN,
piano; THOMAS HILBISH, conductor.

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