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September 08, 1973 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, September 8, 19?3

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage z)even '

Saturday,| Setebr ,193TH|ICIANDIL ag -vr

Antiquated gymnasiums shut down

due

to recreation's budget problems

By MARCIA MERKER
The intramural program, fund-
ed both by the athletic depart-
ment and the physical education
department, has been forced to
close Waterman and Barbour
Gymnasiums until October 1, pre-
sumably. Last year, the depart-
ment was in similar straits, but
kept the two buildings open, and
ran into trouble as one co-ed was
assaulted on the Waterman track
and many thefts were reported.
The intramural department has
decided not to take the secur-
ity risk this year, so the open-
ings of the gyms will depend on
the Physical Education Depart-
ment budget report due next
week. That department supplies
the funds for personnel, which
Waterman and Barbour lacked
last fall during the thefts.
DESPITE THE CLOSING of
these two facilities, the univer-
s ity still sponsors pace-changing
intramural sports. Michigan of-
fers activities ranging from ka-
rate to touch football to archery
at three different levels - infor-
mal recreation, sport clubs and
intramural competition.
Informal recreation goes on in

the Sports Building, Monday-
through Friday 8 A.M. to 10 P.M.
and Saturday 8 A.M. to 6 P.M.;
in the Matt Mann Pool, 3 p.m.-
10:30 P. M. Monday through Fri-
day and Saturday 10:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.-5:30
p.m.; and at the Margaret Bell
Pool, times to be posted. Every
Friday between 7 P.M. and 10
P.M. is co-rec night at the I. M.
building.
Handball, squash and paddle-
ball courts are available in re-
serve basis only in the Sports
Building. To reserve a court go

to the Sports Building paddleball
desk, 8:30 a.m.-10 a.m. and 12 a.-
1 p.m. Monday through Friday
and Saturday 8 A.M.-10 A.M. or
to the I.M. main office any other
time.
Lockers can be. rented for
$5.00/semester, with $1.00 extra
for towel and lock rental, at the
Sports Building and Waterman
Gym.
SPORTS CLUBS are beginning
now with the bike club meeting
Sept. 19, 7:30 p.m., in the Wo-
men's Athletic Building. Other

clubs include rugby, basketball,
synchronized swimming, horse-
back riding and volleyball. Look
for future announcements in the
Daily for general meetings.
The intramural competitive
program encompasses individual,
dual and team sports organized
into residence hall, fraternity,
graduate and co-recreation divi-
sions. The entry procedure for
an individual or team is to sub-
mit an application to the Sports
Building I. M. main office be-
tween 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday.

STUDENTS NEEDING some ex-
tra change to offset the effects
of the Nixon Administration
might do well to check out the
possibility of catching on as an
intramural student assistant.
More than 500 students work each
year as program and office as-
sistants, lifeguards, building and
field supervisors, and sport of-
ficials. Those interested should
contact the Intramural Office.
For further information, drop-
in to the I. M. main office at
State and Hoover or call 763-
1313.

.~.................
... . . . . ^ . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . .
.:.......................r. .::::.:::'. V':: :::::::::::!::::::J" :!.:.::.h ":'Y..:..1..,...\ ....".t.A .r:K,.~..rr 1A 1 X

Daily Photo by TERRY McCARTHY

Rugby club action . .

...part of the IM scene
The Michigan rugby club, shown here performing before a mob of howling thousands (not pictured),
provides its members with a beautiful way to spend an autumn afternoon . . . and parties which are
beautiful. ways to spend autumn evenings. The rugby club is just one of a myriad of activities spon-
sored-in whole or in part-by the Michigan Intramural Department. Although the IM program is
perennially beset by major funding hassles, an example of which is happening right now, a wide va-
riety of programs to satisfy peoples' desire to participate in athletics will be available at the Big U'
again this year . . . provided Don Canham doesn't step aside in favor of Herb Stein.

Night Editor:
ROGER ROSSITER

Spo ts

Saturday,
Sept. 8,1973

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Sports of The Daily

TIGERS HUMILIATED

Cubs

U

The injury report
The injury report on the Maize and Blue is in and the word
is the footballers are hurting. A partial toll, listed by name, in-
jury, position, and status, reads as follows: Harry Banks, broken
hand, tailback, out for entire season; Jeff Perlinger, knee, de-
fensive tackle, status unclear; Rick White, knee, split end, day
to day proposition; Mike Hoban, bruised leg, offensive guard,
playing hurt; Jim Coode, back problem, offensive tackle, will
go on Monday; Larry Cipa, knee, quarterback, ready to go to-
day;, Geoff Steger, bruised elbow, wolf, playing hurt; Gil Chap-
man, hamstring, tailback, slight but painful; Dave Metz, neck,
offensive guard, unknown; and Craig McMullen, neck, offensive
guard, unknown.
Who says opening day is a snap?
Court-ing the Open
FOREST HILLS - Margaret Court and Evonne Goolagong
won semifinal matches yesterday to set up the first all-Austral-
ian women's singles final in the history of the U. S. Open tennis
championships.
Court, playing alternatingly brilliant and lazy tennis, downed
Chris Evert, 7-5, 2-6, 6-2. Court's victory was the product of her
ability to play a strong baseline game against Evert. Goolagong
had to rally to down unseeded Helga Masthoff, 6-1, 4-6, 6-4.
In the men's semi-finals, Jan Kodes, seeded fifteenth in spite
of his victory at Wimbledon, will confront favored Stan Smith. In
the other semi-final John Newcome will face Ken Rosewall, still
any ageless wonder despite his 38 years.
Cross Country Notes
The Michigan harriers, planning to improve on last year's
second place finish in the Big Ten, open their season today with
a intra-squad meet at the University Golf Course. Their first
inter-collegiate competition will come next Saturday at the
Eastern Michigan Invitational.
Splashing good show
BELGRADE - The United States' men's 800 meter freestyle
relay team smashed the world record in yesterday's competition
at the World Swimming championships. Considering that the
U.S. squad almost failed to qualify for the final, the time of
7:33.22, eight seconds under the United States' old world mark,
is all the more remarkable.
Ironically, Coach Gus Stager, Michigan swim coach during
the collegiate season, used his second string during the qualify-
ing race. The second string had one member who swum under
an illness, and the U. S. barely made the grade.
Sign up and Join up
Tennis coach Brian Eisner announces a meeting this Mon-
day, September 10, at 7 P.M. in the Athletic Administration
Building (State and Hoover) for all those interested in playing
for the 1973-74 Wolverine squa'd. All attending should bring their
fall schedules, local addresses and telephone numbers . . . Those
for wrestling should meet Wednesday evening, September 12, in
the Sports Services Building (directly south of Yost Fieldhouse)
at 7 . . . And for those interested in hockey, but lacking playing
skill: new mentor Dan Farrell is in search of managers. He can
be reached at the Athletic Department offices. Practice on solid
land begins September 12 . . . Additional student trainers are
needed now. If you have had any experience contact Lindsy
McLean (761-7414) at the athletic department as soon as pos-
sible for full details.
White-washed
ARLINGTON - After Bob Short dumped Aurelio Rodriguez,
Ed Brinkman, and Joe Coleman, people wondered about his
baseball sense. He ended those doubts yesterday. He has none.
He fired Whitey Herzog, an acknowledged baseball genius, and
placed Del Wilbern, an acknowledged mediocrity, in his stead.
On tab . .
Eastern Michigan opens up its schedule against Ball
State, 1:30 at EMU . . . The Michigan Rugby Club plays
Cleveland Blue at 2:00 and 3:30 at Palmer Field . . . Ne-
braska takes on UCLA. You can catch it on Channel 7 at
4:30.
MASS MEETING for
SOPH SHOW'S
Wonderful Town

From Wire Service Reports
CHICAGO - Chicago Cub left-
fielder Billy Williams had a, perfect
5-for-5 day at the plate, including
a disputed two-run double, as the
cliffhanging Cubbies pounded out
an 8-2 victory over the St. Louis
Cardinals yesterday.
Chicago manager Whitey Lock-
man, whose squad has been
counted allsbut out ofhthe Na-
tional League East race, called
the game a "lifesaver. I felt we
had to win today-we're in a lot
of trouble if we lost."
Chicago pitcher Burt Hooten shut
down the Redbirds on seven scat-
tered hits, prompting Cardinal
manager Red Schoendienst to la-
ment "we just weren't hitting."
Bosox blast
BOSTON - The Detroit Tigers,
seemingly out to prove they never
belonged in the pennant race in
the first place, watched the Boston
Red Sox pelt the outfield with line
drives and went down to an em-
barrassing 11-3 fiasco.
1 Orlando Cepeda spearheaded the
Beantown attack, capoing two Bos-
ton surges with run-producing base
hits.
Bengal starter and loser Jim
Perry was given an early 1-0
lead when Gates Brown hit a
second inning homer. Immedi-
ately thereafter, Perry began to

groove those fat ones, and the
Bosox erupted for a five run rally
which Fred Scherman had to be
called in to squelch.
Marty Pattin pitched well enough1
o garner credit for the victory. It
idn't take much, but he managed.
o jack up his season record to
3-13.
Reds retreat
ATLANTA- Cincinnati starter
Ross Grimsley effectively killed
is team's seven game winning
Streak by serving up two-run home
un pitches to Dusty Baker and
Marty Perez in the sixth inning of
yesterday's Reds-Atlanta g a me,
riving the Braves the decisive edge
n a 5-0 victory.
Ron Schueler pitched an excel-
five-hitter in the Atlanta "hit-
ser' park" to chalk up his eighth
victory of the season.
The Braves had collected only
one hit off Grimsley before Mike
Lum led off the sixth with a
triple. After a popup and a suc-
cessful fielder's choice -at the
plate, Baker smashed his 17th
homer of the season over the left
field fence.
Atlanta had gained a 1-0 lead in
:he second when Baker walked,
aced to third on Tony Perez'
:hrowing error and crossed home
on Marty Perez' sacrifice fly.

ards
Pirates explode
PITTSBURGH - The Pittsburgh
Pirates exploded for six runs in
the ninth inning to defeat the Phil-
adelphia Phillies 10-8 last night.
Two-out singles by Willie Stargell
and Richie Zisk knocked in the
tying and winning runs.
The Phils mounted a desper-
ate counterattack, scoring three
runs in their half of the ninth,
but it wasn't enough to spoill
Danny Martaugh's return to the
Pirate reins. Murtaugh replaced
Bill Virdon as Pirate manager
last Thursday as club general
manager Joe E. Brown decided
to pull out all the stops in a
desperation drive for the National
League East title.
The Bucs are only two games
behind the division-leading Red-
birds and are tied with St. Louis
in the loss column. Both teams
have suffered 69 defeats so far
this year.
* * 4
Yanks blanked
NEW YORK-George Scott, ob-
viously untroubled by recent dis-
putes between him and the Mil-
waukee Brewer management, trip-
led home two runs and scored
another in the first inning yester-
day, leading the Brewers to a 5-0
triumph over the bumbling New
York Yankees.
In the Brewer first, Pedro
Garcia beat out a bunt single off
over-the-hill Yankee pitcher Sam
McDowell. Bob Colluccio worked
McDowell for a walk, something
the Fun City hurler has yielded
consistently throughout his base-
ball career. After both runners
advanced on an infield out, Mc-
Dowell hummed in a fastball
which landed on the auxiliary
scoreboard in left field.
Scott then scored on Don Money's
sacrifice fly.
Jim Slaton, a pleasant Brewer
surprise this year, supported his
team's attack with a fine six-hitter
to secure the victory.
* *p*
Perr pele

AP Photo
CINCINNATI REDS' thirdbase-
man Dan Driessen (22) steals
second ahead of Dave Johnson's
tag during Atlanta's 5-0 victory
over the Reds last night. The
Reds, however, still cling to a
slim lead over Los Angeles in the
tight National League West race.

BAGELS and LOX BRUNCH
The bagels for brunch bunch presents food, frivol-
ity, and some good talking with PROF., CARL
COHEN, Professor of Philosophy.
SUNDAY morning-Sept. 9 at 11:00
H ILLEL Foundation-1429 Hill

Major, egeStandings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE
East

I.__

East

Baltimore
Boston
Detroit
New York
Milwaukee
Cleveland
Oakland
Kansas City
Chicago
Minnesota
California
Texas

W L
80 57
78 63
74 68
71 70
68 72
61 82

Pet. GB
.584 -
.547 4
.522 8!%'
.504 11
.485 13's
.427 22

West

St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Montreal
New York
Cijicago
Phiiadelphia
Cincinnati
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Houston
Atlanta
San Diego

w
72
68
68
67
66
63
85
83
79
71
68
50

L
69
69
71
73
78
56
58
59
71
74
89

Pct.
.511
.497
.489
.479
.475
.447
.604
.589
.572
.500
.478
.360

West

82
76
71
67
62
48

58
62
70
72
73
91

.587
.551
.503
.483
.459
.344

5
11?/
14%
17 '/
3314

inter est

Career
you?

Yesterday's Results
Boston 11, Detroit 3
Milwaukee 5, New York 0
Baltimore 7, Cleveland 3
California at Kansas City, postponed,
rain
Chicago 5, Minnesota 2
Texas 10, Oakland 8
Today's Probable Pitchers
Oakland (Holtzman 20-11) at Texas
(Hudson 4-1)
California (Singer 17-12) at Kansas
City (Splittorff 15-10)
Chicago (Forster 6-5) at Minnesota
Goltz 4-4)
Baltimore (Palmer 18-8) at Cleve-
land (Wilcox 7-7)
Milwaukee (Champion 4-6) at New
York (Medich 11-8)
Detroit (Coleman 18-15) at Boston
(Lee 16-8)

Yesterday's Results
Chicago 8, St. Louis 2
New York 1, Montreal 0
Pittsburgh 10, Philadelphia 8
Atlanta 5, Cincinnati 0
San Diego at Los Angeles, incomplete
Houston at San Francisco, incomplete
Today's Probable Pitchers
New York (Seaver 16-8) at Mon-
treal (Rogers 7-3)
Pittsburgh (Moose 9-11) at Phil-
adelphia, (Carlton 11-17)
St. Louis (Cleveland 13-7) at Chi-
cago (Pappas 6-11)
Cincinnati (Billingham 17-8) at At-
lanta (Morton 11-10)
San (Diego (Kirby 7-16) at Los An-
geles (John 12-7)
Houston (Wilson 9-15 or Richard
5-2) at San Francisco (Bradley 12-
11)

I

CLEVELAND-The supercharged
Baltimore Orioles got three hits
apiece from Rich Coggins and Earl
Williams to drown spitballing Gay-
lord Perry and the Cleveland In-
dians 7-3 in their game last night.
Frank Duffy, clearly wanting to
stay in the majors next year, pow-
ered two homers off winning pitch-
er Dave McNally in the Tribe'sI
only sign of life.

e-- -- --

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-Jimi Hendrix-Jan and Dean-Janis Joplin-The Kinks-
Otis Redding-The Supremes-The Temptations-Ten Years
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