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September 08, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, September 8, 1973

[ HE MICHIGAN DAILY

vage Flvee.

Saturday, September 8, 1 973 tHE MICHIGAN DAILY l'oge live

TO ESTHER:
A lery special birthday greeting to iy
"older woiman" and slpecial Pierson. We still
keep smiling; it's beautiful. Happy Birth-
dlay Baby.
RON
4 , s 'i. {; c. + ' f'' '?.Cte e7 s t rr : C ,s le. .lL.c ' r' s e i

Two Mike Nichols Hits
Together for the first time

JosephE.Levine presents a
Mike NiChoisFim
Carnal Knolmedge
PAnavision Technicolor
An Ave. Emkusy Pktwur

K JOSEPHi E.LEVINEACDM
p'esenta sAAD
MIKE NICWARS
AKE CETU MNWINNER
PAWo E ECE T,, NBEST
t / N NIC O .S
EEEE ,f 114

A"

Fall Term
U of M STUDENTS!
Buy USED TEXTBOOKS
SAVE TO 33V3%
AT
FOLLETT'S ~
F MICHIGAN BOOK STORE
State Street at North U.
Check our new book prices, too!

TECHNICOLOR PANAVISION
An Ave* Embassy Reioas..dk

t

NOW
SHOWING
SOON: CLOCKWORK ORANGE

1214 S. University
Dial 668-6416
For Show Times

U U

r

Who says

Doily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI

'A Rainbow of soiund(

Count Basie and his orchestra help kick off the three-day Ann Arbor Blues and Jazz Festival, which began last night at Otis Spann Me-
morial Field. The evening's performers included Freddie King, Leon Thomas, J. B. Hutto and the Hawks, Roosevelt Sykes, and the Revo-
lutionary Ensemble. See review in tomorrow's Daily.

"YOUR THINKING
ORMAKES YOUR LIFE!"?
s .
UNITY does.
What is UNITY?
UNITY is a practical, metaphysical philosophy for
living, based on
Positive Thinking and Meditation,
and the proposition that,God is within us.
UNITY SERVICES--11:00 a.m. Sundays

i
i
I
,i

THE
"MIND-
BLOWING
SUSPENSE"'
--Champlin,
L.A. Times
"SUPERB!"
--N Y
Magazine

THE NUMBER ONE
OF THE YEA
NOW-THE SUS
FILM OF THE Y
led Zinnemann
aTAIS

E BOOK
V 5th
HIT
PENSE
EAR! WEEK
's ;
EDWARD
FOX
is the
JACKAL
1 PM-3:35-6:10-8:50

Well

known

mime artist

OPEN 12:45--DAILY SHOWS AT

603 E. LIBERTY
I ~DIAL___________ _
665-6290r

to conduct

U,

workshops

Nationally known mime artist
C. W. Metcalf will conduct a two-
week workshop in his specialty
for University students, who will
give a recital of their skills in
Mendelssohn.
The workshop, which begins
Monday, is restricted to selected
theatre students. It is the first in
a series of professionally taught
workshops :instituted by Richard
Meyer, Director of Theatre Pro-
grams.
Metcalf, now an artist-in-resi-
dence at Florida State University
calls his w o r k "missionary
work." He is trying to introduce
people to the art of 'mime and

to move mime into the field of
therapy.
All his efforts, however, are
aimed at developing a greater
appreciation of the beauty, pow-
er, and joy of mime. He ex-
plains, "One listens to mime with
the eyes and sees with the sto-
mach. Mime is the music and
the marrow of the theatrical ex-
perience. It is the lungs of dance
and the basis of man's everyday
communication of silence. Its
distinctive power as an individual
art form makes it one of life's
most universal experiences."
The founder of the Magic
Mountain Mime School in Santa

Cruz, Calif., Metcalf studied un-
der the tutelage of Yass Hako-
shima, the Japanese master, and
has training in yoga, tai-chi, jug-
gling and gymnastics.
In addition to performing, Met-
calf has worked -with groups in
prisons and with deaf and re-

tarded children; putting his art
to use in therapy.
For a campus lucky enough to
have Marcel Marceau perform,
Metcalf's performance with Uni-
versity students on Sept. 22 pro-
mises to revive and deepen in-
terest in the art of mime.

3301 Creek Drive

971-4496

Don't just get into religion-get into yourself.

i

'Ark Coim mnity' to
aid folk cofeus

Blues *

Broadway

9 Classical

Folk " Jazz * Maranatha

New Rele
Potato 4

r

te

tonight
6:00 2 9 News
50 Star Trek
6:30 2 CBS News
4 News
9 Tommy Tompkins
7:00 2 Evil Touch
4 George Pierrot
9 Stratusfaction-Music
50 Lawrence Welk
7:30 2 Dusty's Trail
4 Johnny Mann's Stand Up and
Cheer
9 Norm Cash
56 Heifetz Concert
8:00 2 All in the Family
4 Emergency!
7 Partridge Family
9 Billy Graham Crusade
50 That Good Ole Nashville Music
8:30 2 Bridget Loves Bernie
7 Paul Lynde
56 Playhouse New York: The
1940s
9:00 2 Mary Tyler Moore
4 A Couple of Dons
7 ABC News Special
9 Document
50 Perry Mason
9:30 2 Bob Newhart
9 To Be Announced
10:00 2 Mission: Impossible
4 Miss America Pageant
7 Soupy's On
9 Pro Football
56 World Symphony.Orchestra
50 Lou Gordon
11:00 2 7 News
11:30 2 Movie
"The Innocents." (English;
1961)
7 Times, Rhythm and Rhymes

50 Movie-Thriller BW
"The Walking Dead." (1936)
12:00 4 News
12:30 4 Johnny Carson
7 Great Gold Concert
9 CBC News
12:45 9 A Look Back
1:00 9 Movie-Drama
"Under Capricorn" (English;
1949)
50 Movie
"While the Patient Slept."
(1935)
1 :30 2 Movie
"Valley of the Dragons." (1961)
7 Murray the K
2:00 4 News
2:30 7 News
3:00 2 Divorce Court
3:30 2 News

By DIANE LEVICK
Arts Editor
Concerned over the Ark coffee-
house's current financial plight,
University students, alumni, and
townsfolk are banding together
as the Ark Community to save
Ann Arbor's longtime center of
folk music.
Folksinger David Bromberg
helped kick off the Ark's own
fundraising campaign this sum-
mer with two benefit concerts.
The Ark Community plans to
sponsor a big-name concert in
Hill Aud. this fall.
David Siglin, who runs the Ark
with his wife Linda, says the
performer will be one who "cani
relate to the Ark people" des-
pite the commercial, aspects of
the concert.
Explaining the source of the
financial bind, Siglin says, "The
Ark has an annual budget of
about $10,000, which has been
supplied for the last ten years
by five local churches, the bulk
coming from the First Presbyter-
ian Church.
"These churches are now hop-
ing to release their funds to oth-
er worthwhile causes, and the

Ark has been asked to find
other sources of support as of
August.'
The Ark Community will put on
benefits until the non-profit cof-
feehouse finds more stable fin-
ancial support. Irish folksinger
Owen McBride from Toronto,
Rosalie Sorrels and Bruce Phil-
lips, have already been sched-
uled to play at the Ark to raise
funds.
Other projects the Ark Com-
munity hopes to undertake in-
clude a bucket drive early in
October, publication of a song-
book and a hardbound souvenir
book about the Ark and its per-
formers, and release of a double
record album next year. Tee-
shirts imprinted with the Ark mo-
tif have already gone on sale.
Those interested in preserving
the nationally known and well-
respected coffeehouse can volun-
teer their services to the Ark
Community through Dick Swain
or attend an Ark performance to
find out more.
Steve Goodman, author of Ar-
lo Guthrie's Top-40 hit City of
New Orleans and a top-notch per-
former in his own right, opens
the Ark's fall season next week-
end.
Have a flair for
If you re interest
ed in reviewing
poetry, and music
or writing feature
stories ao ut the
dramna. dance. film,
arts: Contact Arm
iiditor, c/o The
Michigan Daily.

i
i

'
,
I
I

W CBN-FM-
89.5 Stereo-

$32 per year 2.3 cubic feet
purchase for $79.50
f rom
336 S. STATE - 769-4980
(formerly Slater's Books)
OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY 9:30 - 9:00

Black Edition
News * Spor
Talkback *

_ . , !

I

ease ! Oldies
o Progressive
1 . Commentary
Is * Public Affairs
Radio Free Ghetto

ru, UW-, .,A L E __
BLUES AND JAZZ FESTIVAL-Rainbow Multi-Media and
Project Community present Music of Detroit with John
Lee Hooker, CJQ, and Yusef Lateef, on Otis Spann Me-
morial Field at noon. Evening show beginning at 6 p.m.
features The Ray Charles Show '73, Charles Mingus,
Jimmy Reed, and the Big Walter Horton Blues Band.
FILM-Cinema Guild shows Maltese Falcon in Arch. Aud.
at 7 and 9:05 p.m.; Cinema II presents Humphrey Bogart
in To Have and Have Not in Aud. A at 7 and 9 p.m.
DRAMA-The Residential College Summer Theatre Pro-
gram presents Tango, a three act farce by Slawomu
Mrozek, in E. Quad Aud. at 8 p.m.
Send publicity for local cultural events to the Arts Edi-
tor, Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, Mich., 48104.

BIBLICAL BIOGRAPHY
Studies in Character, Conscience, Crisis
AT THE
University Reformed Church
1001 E. HURON
9:30 A.M
Each week one of the following characters will be
discussed:
Esau, Judah,. Miriam, Balak, Deborah, Eli, Ahi-
tophel, Joab, Gehazi, Jehoiada, Amos, Jeremiah,
Barnabas, Silas, Priscilla.
Focal Questions for discussion include:
What personal, civic, and religious issues did they
face?
What character crisis did these provoke?
How do these parallel dilemmas of our own?
Instructor: Kenneth L. Pike
WORSHIP SERVICE-10:30 A.M.
Calvin Malefyt and Alan Rice, Ministers

Are you interested in ..

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play by play?

TUES. SEPT.11 IN CONCERT D**R OPEN
* Eu, 730
* 4
*
FIEDDmE KING
AND
MUSKADINE BLUES BAND
* AND 4
D d XI 1'

--------- --

Cinema 1

If you want to do any
of these things
CBN NEEDS YOU!I!!
'tnn hv

TONIGHT ONLY
HUMPHREY BOGART in

1944

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