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September 07, 1973 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-07

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Friday, September 7, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Fridoy, September 7, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

I

CHALLENGING U.S.

China's
LONDON, (Reuter) - China is "An
d e v e 1 o p i n g an interconti- missile
nental nuclear missile which ing mo
could hit most major targets in United
the United" States, and has al- veloped
ready produced rockets which The to
can reach Moscow and parts, of full ran
Asia. areas
This buildup of the Chinese nu- oceans.
clear force was reported yester- which c
day by the International Insti- ing suc
tute for Strategic Studies in its the insi
annual publication "The Military China
Balance" tion of
It also noted that despite the iig the
Soviet - sAmerican agreement of sfficier
May lst year setting limits on clear
strategic missiles there was "lit- pile cc
tle evidence of superpower re- next fe
straint" in developing their nu- livery s
clear weaponry and their air and aircraft
sea, power. also ha
tic miss
On Chin's nrogress in the nin- did not
clear race, the institute, an inde- sies fo
pendent r e s e a r c h or- Asse
ganization, reported: a multi- ances,
stage intermediate range ballistic viet Un
missile (IRBM) with a longer superio
range of perhaps 3,500 miles suf- States
ficient to reach Moscow and siles,
most parts of Asia, has been pro- from s
duced and may be ready for op- standin
ca
erational deployment. ArBut c,
a come
her ofr
deliver
tiple in
entry v
kets
20-2
GET U
ATTENTIO

nuclear stre

intercontinental ballistic
(ICBM) capable of reach-
ost major targets in the
States is also being de-
."
esting of such a missile at
nge would require impact
in the Indian or Pacific
An instrumentation ship
could be used for monitor-
ch a test has been built,
titute said. ,
had expanded its produc-.
fissionable materials dur-
year. They may now be
nt for more than 200 nu-
weapons "and the stock-
ould grow rapidly in the
w years." A variety of de-
systems, both missiles and
t, were available. China
d a submarine with ballis-
ssile launching tubes but
appear to have the mis-
r it.
ssing the superpower bal-
the institute said the So-
nion now had a numerical
rity over the United
in offensive strategic mis-
including those launched
ubmarines, with the score
g at 2,155 compared to the
can 1,710.
he United States still held
manding lead in the num-
nuclear warheads it could
through the MIRV (mul-
dependently targetable re-
vehicle) systems on its roc-
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With this system, one subma-
rine - launched missile can carry
10 to 14 warheads which can be
separately directed on different
targets. The Soviet Union has no
MIRVS in operation but two of
its latest inter-continental roc-
kets - the SS-17 and SS-18 are
reportedly being prepared to
carry the full MIRV system at a
-later stage, according to the pub-
lication.
Under the limits set by last
years strategic arms limitation
talks (SALT) agreements, the
United States is held, to a ceiling
of 1,710 ICBMs and submarine-
launched missiles (SLBMS).
The Soviet Union was given a
higher total of 2,424 under the
agreement, which is in force un-
til 1977.
Both governments, the insti-
tute said, seemed determined to
reach the limits set by their
agreement as soon as possible
while also obtaining the maxi-
mum qualitiative capability."
It was estimated that by the
end of the 1970s the United
States' 1,710 strategic missiles
could be carrying well over 8,000
warheads. It was also noted that
the Soviets now had three new
submarines each carrying 12 nu-
clear missiles with a 4,600-mile
range.
In strategic airpower, which is

ngth onrise
not constr.ined by the SALT io Etrope where the Warsaw
agreements, the institute calcu- Pact powers retained their nu-
lNted that the United States was mericrl advantages in troops,
far ahead with nearly four times tanks and planes.
more long-range bombers than In the Central Europe area on
the Soviet Air Force's 140. On top which the east-west negotiations
of that the destructive power of on mutual reductions of forces
the American bombers was also and armaments in Vienna next
being greatly boosted by equip- month will concentrate, there
ping them with the SRAM air-to- was only a slight difference in
ground nuclear missile. the troop strengths of the NATO
The inter - continental B-52 and Warsaw Pact forces. But
bomber can carry 20 SRAMS there ws a big disparity in ar-
each with a one-megaton war- inored strength with the NATO
head with the destructive power powers having less than half the
of one million tons of TNT. %V rsaw Pact's 13,800 tanks.
During the year the United The institute calculated, how-
States military forces dropped by ever, th,t new weapons systems,
a further '150,000 to 2,250,000 particularly precision - guided
while Soviet manpower rose mar- munitions and anti-tank missiles
ginally to 3,425,000. coming into NATO's inventories,
The institute reported little may begin to redress the tank
change in the military balance imbalance.
CENTER FOR JAPANESE: STUUiES
AND
The Depart ile st of althrope gy
PRESENT:
PROFESSOR GEORGE A. DEVOS
Professor of Anthropoloqv, University of California (BerkelevI
410NDAY. SEPT. 10,.4 p.m.. 229 Aigel Hall
TOPIC: "The Anthropologist in Urban Studies; Japan"
TUESDAY, SEPT. 11, 2 p.n., 200 Lane h all
TOPIC: "Expressive Aspects of Japanese Paternalism"

TONIGHT
2 W.C. FIELDS
FLICKS!
5 LIVE MUSICIANS,
PUNCH AND COOKIES
Live People
OPEN HOUSE
U. Reorim'd Church
8-11
Huron at Pletcher

WELCOMES RETURNING
U of M STUDENTS
with a
SPECIAL SIISALE

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HOU R
WEDNESDAY
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Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM
LOTS OF FOOD

BAGELS and LOX BRUNCH
The bagels for brunch bunch presents food, frivol-
ity, and some good talking with PROF. CARL
COHEN, Professor of Philosophy.
SUNDAY morning-Sept. 9 at 11:00
HILLEL Foundation-1429 Hill

IF IT'S
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A
GOOD
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3035 Washtenaw across from Lee Oldsmobile

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