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December 12, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-12-12

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Wednesday, December 12, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

THEMIHIANDAIY-ag Tre

Rockefeller resigns
governorship of N.Y.

The major farm commodities
in terms of cash earnings in
Utah are cattle, dairy products,
sheep and turkeys.

ALBANY, N.Y. (Reuter)-Nel-
son Rockefeller announced yes-
terday he is resigning as gover-
nor of New York, a step most ob-
servers saw as the opening move
of his final critical goal - win-
ning the presidency in 1976.
Rockefellers resignation after
15 years as Republican governor
of New York had been widely ru-
mored for several weeks and he
finally confirmed the speculation
when he told a crowded press
gathering he was turning the gov-
ernorship over to Lieutenant-Gov-
ernor Malcolm Wilson yesterday.
Rockefeller has already made
three unsuccessful attempts to
win the Republican presidential
nomination - in 1960, 1964 and
1968. And although his resigna-
tion in advance of next year's
New York state elections was
widely interpreted as the begin-
ning of a campaign for the presi-
dential ticket for the 1976 elec-
tions, Rockefeller said yesterday
he does not now consider himself
a possible candidate.
Rockefeller said he nad decid-
ed to resign because he "could
render a greater public service
to the people of New YoriK and
the nation by devoting full time
to the work of two bipartisan
commissions."
He added: "My one regret is
that the undertaking of these
tasks has been interpreted as a
political maneuver to seek the
presidency. I am not a candidate
for the nomination for the presi-
dency or for any other political
office. Whether I become a can-
didate in the future I do not
know. I would like to keep my
options open."~
By ruling himself out as a ca -
didate at the present time, Rock-
efeller does not have to adhere

to the strict new federal stand-
ards on campaign spending. He
said he would ultimately decide
on his presidential plans late '
in 1975.
The two bodies Rockefeller said
he wanted to devote his time to
are the National Commission on
Critical Choices for America and
the National Commission on Wa-
ter Quality.
The Commission on Critical
Choices is a much-heralded group!
composed of 40 leading Amer-
icans which is to analyse the im-
pact of present world trends and
the nation's future security and
well-being.
Observers have said the group
could aid Rockefeller if he de-
cides to actively seek the Presi-
dential nomination by giving him
continued national exposure.
Although Rockefeller has den-
ied he is using the organza-
tion as a springboard for the
nomination, its setup is rather
unique. Up to 20 million dollars
-some from Rockefeller and
some from his millionaire broth-
ers - will be used for tanedcom-
mission. It will operate under
the Rockefeller-established Third
Century Corporation and the
Rockefellers hope to get addi-
tional government funds.
Asked by reporters after he an-
nounced his resignation whether
this was the first step in a pre-
sidential compaign, Rockefeller
replied, "That's inaccurate from
my point of view."
In the first try in 1960, Rocke-
feller had a famous confrontation
with Richard Nixon at Rocke-a
feller's Fifth Avenue apartment
in New York city. When offered
the vice-presidential spot by Nix-

THE MICHIGAN PALLY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 80
Wednesday, December 12, 1973
is edited and manag ed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May,
nard Street, Ann Arbor. Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (carn-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio ; $12 non-local maill (other states
and foreign).
Summer session pubiishea Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail ;other
states and foreign).
Ia

STILL LOOKINGf
THAT UNIQUE
X-MAS PRESENT
STOP!
AT THE NEW
Give the folks bac
colorful, long-slee
one of our striking
r ra
SPECIAL WI
All short-slee
Also: FREE
Si
Es

FOR BO '
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' STORE
330 S.State St.
k home a little bit of Ann Arbor-a warm,
ved turtleneck T-shirt emblazoned with
g cultural designs:
ALSO:
Amorphia papers
Roach clips
Thai Bongs
ONLY $4.00 T-shirts
15 different Pillows
designs Records
Newspapers
Magazines
Books
Candles
Incense
WMEUP!Wetc
Open
INTER/CHRISTMASSALE!
ved T-shirts now ONLY $2.50!
RECORD ALBUMS, while they last!
N Trucking Co., 330 S. State Street, 2nd Floor
immer of Fourty, Too, above Pinball City
tore Hours: Mon - Thurs: Noon to 7pm
Fri - Sat : Noon to midnight

AP Photo
Governer Nelson Rockefeller announced his resignation yesterday
after fifteen years as New York states top man. The resignation
will take effect Tuesday, allowing Rockefeller to begin what inform-
ed sources consider to be his last attempt at winning the presi-
dency although the campaign is as yet unofficial. Lt. Gov. Mal-
colm Wilson, Rockefellers right hand man during his entire term in

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the office, will become governor.
on, the governor reportedly said:
"I'm not a standby candidate."
In 1964, he opposed Barry Gold-
water but was roundly booed at
the party's national convention
in San Francisco. His chances
that year were generally consid-
ered to be badly damaged by a
divorce and subsequent remar-
riage to a woman who also had
been divorced.

fta
SChristmas is coming?
Pah! DAVID'S
BOOKS are still
25% cheaper {
209 S. STATE
t .

'1%

i.

ii

I

I

PHILIPPE DE BROCA'S
THE KING OF HEA RTS
... and again .. . and again. Alan Bates. But be warned: because of

THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY OF JERUSALEM
Programs for American Students 1914/15

l

ONE YEAR PROGRAM-for college sophomores and juniors.
FRESHMAN YEAR-of 4-year program to BA,
B.Sc. degrees.
REGULAR STUDIES-for college transfer students
toward B.A. and B.Sc. degrees.
GRADUATE STUDIES-Master's and Doctoral programs.
SUMMER COURSES-given in English.
--- - - - -For applications and information: ---- --- - ---
OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS / AMERICAN FRIENDS OF THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY I
11 EAST 69 STREET, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10021 / 212 - 988-84001
Name
Address-
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PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
PRESENTS
EVELYN KEYES BENNY BAKER
BETTY KEAN
with'the great song hits-
"I WANT TO BE HAPPY""TEA FOR TWO"
"NO, NO, NANETTE"
INNER OF 4 TONY AWARDS
POWER CENTER-Dec. 15, 16
(MATS. & EVES.)
Advance ticket sales at PTP Ticket Office-
Michigan League 764-0450
SEATS STILL AVAILABLE FOR SAT. MATINEE!

I

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.;: s..
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':,:
f+
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,Y.

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changes in film rights, this will be the last night for 3 years.

TONIGHT AT
7:0 & 9:00

ANGELL HALL
Auditorium A

W. C. FIELDS in

TILLIE AND GUS
Fields and Alison Skipworth are formidable as two c a rd sharps who
attempt to recuse a niece in an ingenious boat race. It is indubitably
one of Fields' better roles.
SHORTS: Robert Benchley's CRIME CONTROL : NO NEWS IS GOOD NEWS
Buster Keaton's THE BLACKSMITH

Adm. $1

Cinema Guild

THURSDAY
7 and 9:05

Architecture Aud.
Adm. $1

COMING ATTRACTIONS
In the Next Two Weeks Cinema Guild Will Show:

i
I

This Fri. THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL.
Leslie HOWARD plays a foppish hero
of the French revolution.
This Sat. THE GANG'S ALL HERE.
Busby BERKELEY'S outrageous tech-
nicolor musical. Alice FAYE.
This Sun. DUCK SOUP. The four
MARX BROTHERS take over the re-
public of Freedonia.

Wed. (Dec. 19) THE GOLD RUSH.
CHARLIE CHAPLIN'S classic comedy
on life in the Yukon.
Thurs. (Dec. 20) SABOTAGE. This
Hitchcock thriller contains the famous
boy on a bus with a bomb.
Fri. (Dec. 21) IT'S A WONDERFUL
LIFE. Frank Capra's Christmas classic.
Jimmy Stewart gets a chance to see
how life would be without him.

I

CINEMA II: COMING ATTRACTIONS
In the Next Two Weeks Cinema II Will Show:

This Fri. THE THIRD MAN. Joseph
Cotton, Orson Welles, and Trevor Ho-
ward in this excellent murder mystery
investigation.
This Sat. CASABLANCA. Humphrey
Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Peter Lorre,
Sydney Greenstreet, Claude Rains ...
need we say more?
This Sun. LE BOUCHER. Claude Cha-
brol's psychological delving into the

Fri. (Dec. 21) STRANGERS ON A
TRAIN. Alfred Hitchcock's classic ex-
ercise in terror ond suspense. Robert
Walker and Farley Granger.
Sat. (Dec. 22) TO BE OR NOT TO
BE. Ernest Lubitsch's fabulous comedy
about a company of Polish actors-
and their antics. C a r o I e Lombard,
Jack Benny, Robert Stack.
Coming next semester: A HARD
DAY'S NIGHT, MALTESE FALCON
first weekend of school . . . pick up
semester schedule at registration and
ticket desk.

motivation of a murderer, a la Hitch-
cock. Subtitled.

' HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

.I

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