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December 11, 1973 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-12-11

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Tuesday, December 11, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Rage Five

Tuesday, December 1 1, 1 9 7 3 T HE MICHIGAN DAiLY Page Five

Images

-1

Oldfie
geniuis;
By TOM OLSON sto
Mike Oldfield's Tubular Bells wh
VR-13-105 is the first release of to
the new Virgin label. Roughly life
speaking, the album is Oldfield's isi
request that he be acknowledged civ
as a bloody genius. He is one. Na
Oldfield's compositions run to ov
about 25 minutes apiece, one to tell
each side of the album. The first T
one is, let's say, extraordinary. alb
The second one is remarkable at ins
least, and from all indications abl
also dazzling. Superb? Sure, why ma
not. sic,

Id's n
Trafj
rv to tell. I'm still not sure
at it is. The second side seems
be about the emergence of
from the primeval slime. Or
it a brief history of Western
ilization since the death of
poleon? The triumph of man
er his own mortality? Who's to
l?
Tubular Bells is a Christmas
um, in its own way-hell, it's
pirational enough. It is prob-
y the first important Christ-
s album ever. It is a rich mu-
al experience that will sound

'w
lc

LP

shows

redundant

I
ARTS
--- ---------

Traffic's problem is that it is
neither yet the great jazz band
that it wants to be, nor the great
rock band that it used to be.
Meanwhile, we will have to be
satisfied with good but not ex-
cellent albums - like this one.
If the rest of Steve Miller's
new album The Joker (Capitol
SMAS-11235) were as good as its
first and last songs, it would be
an album worth inviting the
neighbors over to hear. Alas, the
wastelands in between make
this just another in a long line of
uninspiring Steve Miller albums.
"Sugar Babe" is a beautifully
slick Texas rock song - simple,
repetitive, and catchy. Miller's
style here is all his own, liquid
and easygoing. The other good
song is "Something to Believe
In," in which a believably ten-
der vocal by Miller proves that
human beings can still make noi-
ses that a synthhesizer can't.
But the bad songs are as bad
as the good ones are good.
"Evil" is an unusually boring
piece of white blues, recorded
live, which doesn't help at all.
"The Joker" is a bit of auto-
biographical conceit, Miller ex-.
ulting in what a mean mother
the rest of the world thinks he
is. The Miller persona just isn't
worth writing a song about.
The obvious question to ask
about Loggins and Messina's
Full Sail (Columbia KC-32540) is,
"Why should grown-up people
want to listen to this music?"
Loggins and Messina have de-

fined a new musical genre:
vacuous lyrics sung in high-
pitched harmonies and sold to
junior-high school kids. Cheerful-
ness is an asset, but insipid
cheerfulness wins no points.
There are only three things
missing here, really. A sense of
tragedy, a bit of emotional depth,
and a couple of voices that you
could take seriously. Until they
get them, Loggins and Messina
will continue to sound like clean-
cut and empty-headed rock and
roll fools.
Orchestra to play
The University of Michigan
Campus Orchestra, whose mem-
bers hail from nearly all the
University's schools and colleges,
will showcase the talents of its
80 non-music majors tonight at
8 p.m. in Hill Aud.
Under the baton of Charles
Gabrion, the group will perform
K a 1 in ikoff' s Symphony
No. 1, Rimsky - Korsakoff's Rus-
sian Easter Overture, and Han-
del's Concerto in D. Minor.
So that all members benefit
equally, the orchestra's reper-
toire consists primarily of works
using full orchestration, such as
Romantic music and orchestra-
tions of Baroque.
The all-campus group was or-
ganized last spring to give non-
music majors the playing ex-
perience that was not previously
available.

Daily Photo by DAVID MARGOLICK

Mother and daughter photos
reflect their different goals

Oldfield is another super - in-
strumentalist. Briefly: he plays
everything that any sensible per-
son has ever tried to make mu-
sic with. His favorite noisemak-
ers are organs, guitars, and bells
of all descriptions. He spent a
month getting them down on tape
the way he wanted them.
The first side introduces us to
Oldfield's musical impressions
of nirvana. But this it not your
average tour of the grounds.
Oldfield brings us nirvana with-
out boredom! His cosmic rock
symphony has everything we
don't expect in one-variety, hu-
mor, and sweet, sweet melodies.
Oldfield's familiarity with his
instruments lets him draw us in
and out of moods at will. His
glockenspiel carries its intelligent
good cheer wherever it goes.
His reed organ insinuates and
foreshadows. His electric guitar
becomes a sinister challenge to
the innocence of the bells.
There are no lyrics, but Old-
field's music has one fantastic

just fine in July.
A nice new live album from
Traffic (On The Road, Island
FMAS-9336) has been turning up
in the stores. Can you live with-
out it? Most likely.
Live albums work best when
they give a band a chance to
explore a song's possibilities in
a way that they can't do in the
studio. But Traffic's songs lately
have not been tight 3minute
masterpieces anyway - they
were 13 minutes long in the
first place. A live album seems
a little redundant at this point.
"Low Spark of High Heeled
Boys" was an impressive piece
of musicronthe original album,
but the version here seems list-
less. The successes are "Shoot
Out at the Fantasy Factory"
and "Sometimes I Feel So Unin-
spired," in which some mellow
vocals and pleasantly wah-wah-
ed guitar work from Steve Win-
wood carry the show off hand-
somely.

By DIANE LEVICK
Arts Editor
Like mother, like daughter?
Not so in the current exhibition
at North Campus Commons en-
titled P~eople, Places, Passim,,
for Margaret Peterson and her
daughter Anne reflect themselves
quite individually in their pho-
tography - and they shoot for
worthy but different goals.
Born in Montreal and now re-
siding in Michigan, Margaret
names "kids, science, and art"
as her three loves, the first and
third passions being easily re-
cognizable in her many color
portraits of young children.
Boasting unimpeachable tech-
nical quality, the prints' com-
position may at first strike the
viewer as somewhat cliched.
But with closer study each por-
trait reveals an original ap-
E proach.
Sunlight penetrates slightly
disarrayed hair, while blurred
srearm like flowers and foliage
dominate the fore and back-
grounds of many of the works.
"English Child" even contains

a bowl of oranges, suggesting
that Margaret belongs to the
school of thought which strains
to make its photographs "as
pretty as pictures" - and ulti-
mately forced and unreal.
However, the artist captures
some very personal element
from each of her child-subjects.
The face of the "English Child,"
seeming strangely older than
its years, expresses a spirited
(mischievous?) happiness. A shot
of a naked little girl, hands on
hips, standing in a shower door-
way, portrays the youngster's
unabashed innocence f r o m
shame.
Margaret shows a good deal
of talent in working with chil-
dren. "If you like kids enough
and spend enough time with
them, they will talk to you . . .
laugh, play games, and listen,"
she says.
Margaret's portraits of older
teenage subjects do not have quite
the same impact, but perhaps
that is because as we grow, we
close ourselves n. Her camera
has no power of X-ray vision.
Whereas Margaret appears en-
grossed with the human subject
as an individual to be exploit-
ed, her daughter, whohas done
a bit of world exploration her-
self, often uses humans to re-
late a message.
Having spent her freshman
college year at Radcliffe, Anne
now attends Stanford, which in-
spired her "Stanford Weekend"
series of black and white prints.
It is a documentation of students
letting themselves go on a de-
serted shoreline.
Anne presents some interest-
ing studies in texture: craggy
rocks, beach blankets in folds
upon rippled sand. Mostly taken
at sunset, the photographs also
o f f e r appealing contrasts of

light and shadow. In general the
shots speak for themselves-as
they should - but Anne insists
on using shoirt captions. Border-
ing on cliche, the words usually
only detract from her accom-
plishment.
Forceful movement renders
Anne's study of an inner city
dance company a worthwhile ex-
perience. She embraces the sym-
metry of the choreography and
the beautiful angles of the lithe
limbs. Facial expressions, too,
are caught in the shots.
Yet, possibly Anne's most
thought - provoking study is the
series "Woman . .. Women." In
part it traces the evolution of
''Sarah," a young woman of
about Anne's age.
Sarah is pictured naked with-
in a literal cocoon of wispy ma-
terial that hangs from a tree; the
cocoon opens. Sarah begins to
oven her dress at the breast. Fin-
ally, she rests her head on her
hand, communicating indecision.
The womon emerges, but what
form sh.ll she take?
Anne has probably not de(id-
ed, for her photographs, which
will remain on displav thronh
Dec. 21, s mest the conflicts
within her. These conflicts, not
necessarily depressing ones, give
the viewer more to digest than
Margaret's simpler but fine
work.
G Chistmas is c,'ming?
Pah ! DAVID'S
BOOKS are still
25% cheaper
209 S. STATE
L i. ^a. .-.Lt b~a i.i. ..'wl "^^..:~wi .

THE MICHIGAN
A . RG OJt E
ON SALE TODAY
A ALL OVER CAMPUS!
GRADUATE STUDENTS WELCOME!

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
PRESENTS
EVELYN KEYES BENNY BAKER
V45 ~tAUSMAL 141
with the great song hits-
AI WANT TO BE HAPPY""TEA FOR TWO"
W NO, NO, NANETTE"
WINNER OF 4 TONY AWARDS)
POWER CENTER-Dec. 15, 16
(MATS. & EVES.)
Advance ticket sales at PTP Ticket Office--
Michigan League 764-0450
GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE FOR SAT. MATINEE!

I FAw

GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
WEDNESDAY
8-10 p.m.
West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM

Alice Cooper
Tickets for tomorrow night's
Alice Cooper concert in Crisler
Arena are still available at the
Michigan Union from UAC-
Daystar.

SEX THERAPY WORKSH OP:
BEHAVIOR THERAPY, C. Smith, PhD.
MASTERS AND JOHNSON CLINICAL TREATMENT, R. Buck, M.D.
RATIONAL EMOTIVE THERAPY, C. Baty, PhD.
HYPNOTHERAPY, K. Bullmer, PhD.
SMALL GROUP DISCUSSION
DEC. 14 and 15-MICHIGAN UNION
FOR REGISTRATION CONTACT:
Institute for Rational Living of Mich., Inc.
2512 Carpenter Rd.
Ann Arbor, Mi. 971-6533

U U f UF
I DOUBLE FEA TURE
MEATBALL &
TEENA GE COWGIRLS
I' AS G PI 1'I

DUETS
a concert in dance and mime

H ANUKAH DINNER
and COFFEE HOUSE
LAST DAY OF CLASSES
Relax and enjoy Latkes and other good eating at
our pre-Hanukah party. While you're having a good
time, enjoy some fine entertainment.
DEC. 12-6:00 p.m.
HILLEL-1429 Hill St.
Reservations for Dinner by Tuesday, 5 p...--$2.OO
STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIV.
DAILY SPECIALS:Beef Stew, Chinese Pepper Steak,
Curried Rice, Goulash etc.
3 Eggs, hash browns, toast and jelly . . $ .95
The above with ham, bacon or sausage . . $1.30 '
%1. lb. Hamburger deluxe ........$ .80
(lettuce, tomato, potato chips, pickles)
The Best Omelets in town

I

1

Tuesday,

December 11

I

U

ot 8:00 P.M.

,"W""
WAN0646

IM

11

East Quad

Auditorium

"AN INCREDIBLY
REVOLUTIONARY

' 231 south state

FREE

,; ,
"' y
ytiw- ,

FILM. .-. THE MIND""
CAN RUN RIOT!"
-N.Y.U. Ticker
"FAR AHEAD OF OPEN 12:45
ITS TIME"-Wolf, Cue SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
TEa UT i E PERIENCE

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