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December 07, 1973 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, December 7, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Friay Dcemer7,197 TE ICHGA DILYPae-i-

Oil product exports up

(Continued from Page 1)
last week that domestic shortages
could put medicines in short supply
this winter. Manufacturers of other
products dependent on petrochemi-
cals have issued similar warnings
of cutbacks.
The Arab oil boycott threatens
to cut deeply into the production of
petrochemicals, which are derived
from petroleum and natural gas.
Petrochemicals are vital to the
manufacture of such varied pro-
ducts as drugs, plastics and syn-
thetic fibers.
Experts analyzing the complicat-
ed Commerce Department figures
said that export volume was run-

ning about 10 to 15 per cent above'
1972 levels through October. They
said the dollar value was about
35 per cent above the 1972 figure.
PETROCHEMICAL sales, domes-
tic and foreign, totaled $20 billion
in 1972. Exports were $2.4 billion.
"We're definitely feeling the
supply squeeze but we have not
had to cut back production for
penicillin and other drugs," said a
spokesman for Pfizer Inc., a major'
drug manufacturer. "The situation,
could get considerably worse if
allocations are reduced."
Toy manufacturers are big con-
sumers of plastics made from

Wolverines praised
by state politicians

petrochemicals. The Toy Manu-
facturers Association said there
were enough supplies to complete
normal production for this Christ-
mas. But plastics cannot be pur-
chased in sufficient quantities to
begin making Christmas toys for
1974, a spokesman said.
In a recent study, Arthur D.
Little Inc., a Massachusetts-based
research firm, said that a 15 per
cent reduction in petrochemical
output could leave 1.6 million to
1.8 million people unemployed in
industries dependent on petro-
chemicals. The study said a 15
per cent cutback in petrochemical
production would cost the economy
$65 billion to $70 billion annually.
The annual Gross National Product
is $1.3 trillion.
The Commerce Department fig-
ures were for each of the many
petrochemicals exported, but were
not totaled. In many of the nu-
merous categories, exports for the
first 10 months of 1973 exceeded
figures for all of 1972.
Mexican Wedding Shirt
HAND EMBROIDERED
$10.95 ppd.
1 00 % cotton
special: 2 for $20.90
PLEATED BIB
no embroidery
$9.95
34-44
2 for $18.90
G.1. Ltd.
Dept. M, Box 724
Pasoic, N.J. 07055
WHOLESALE INQUIRIES

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Huge L/P Record Sale
TODAY
STATE STREET at North University

BAGELS FOR BRUNCH
BUNCH presents
"A So!dier's View of
Yom Kippur's War"
Speaker: MAJ. TUViA NOVOT
Iraeli Army Officer who fought in
Yom Kippur war
Sun., Dec. 9-11 am. HILLEL, 1429 Hill

THIS SLIGHTLY enhanced view of Jupiter, shot from Pioneer 10,
shows the planet's great red spot. Scientists speculate that the
giant planet is shrinking under its own gravitational force, an in-
dication that it might be a still-born star formed at the same time
as the sun.
Scientists say Jupiter
may be growing smaller

MOUNTAIN VI
Pioneer 10's th
found that Jupit
times more heat
from the sun, su
solar system's big
be shrinking, sciei
Their finding,
closed at a news
terday supports
Jupiter is slowly;
experiencing the
birth that a new
THE SCIENTIS
manned Pioneer s
Fuel cr
hits ho
travel
(Continued fi

EW, Calif. (JP- one of Jupiter's moons, lo, has an
hermometer has atmosphere that is denser than
er generates 2/2 expected.
than it receives This discovery suggests that the
ggesting that the 2,500-mile diameter moon is similar
ggest planet may in structure to earth and the other
ntists say. p lanets close to the sun, the scien-
which was dis-' tists said-
conference yes- Pioneer 10 was the first space-
a theory that craft from earth to survey Jupiter,
growing smaller, close up. The unmanned 570-pound
same agonies of probe, after traveling through
star undergoes. space than any previous craft,
swung within 81,000 miles of the
TS said the un- planet Monday night. Jupiter's
atellite found that great gravity then pushed it on-
- ward into the solar system.
! *DR. GUIDO MUNCH of the Cali-
Isis fornia Institute of Technology dis-
played a temperature map of Jupi-
ter's cloud tops, which are about
minus 200 degrees Fahrenheit.
i 1 ayEarth-based operations have in-
I dicated Jupiter radiates more en-
ergy than it receives from the
sun, a puzzling phenomenon. Some
scientists have proposed that the
from Page1) planet is experiencing gravitational'
contractions-slowly growing small-

LANSING (UPI) - The state
House yesterday passed a reso-
lution honoring the University of
Michigan Wolverines for their un-
defeated season, but claiming they
"were unjustly deprived of their
rightful chance at the 1974 Rose
Bowl'."
The resolution was passed on a
voice vote.
T H O U G H UNJUSTLY de-
prived of their rightful chance at
the 1974 Rose Bowl, the Wolver-
ines are truly the 'Champions of
the West,"' the resolution reads.
"In spit of numerous injuries,
they surged ahead in the true Wol-
verine tradition."
The resolution lauded the Mich-
igan team for an "incredible
achievement" and asked the Sen-
ate for concurrence in support of
the tribute.
IN A second football resolution,
introduced but not yet acted upon
by the legislature, Rep. Charlie
Harrison, (D-Detroit), called for a
special committee to study the
feasibility of holding an annual
post - season college football bowl
game at the Pontiac Metropolitan
Stadium.
"The Midwest region of the Unit-
ed States has long been recog-

nixed as the cradle of college foot-
ball," Harrison's resolution states,
"yet there has never been an es-
tablished post-season bowl game
played here, presumably because
of adverse weather conditions."
The Pontiac stadium is an all-
weather sports arena.
If passed by the legislature, the
feasibility committee woulld be,
granted $2,500 to conduct the
study.

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Ann Arbor's Most Complete
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LITTLE P"ROFESSOR"S-Maple Village

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7

6:30 P.M.

But most of those people who er and denser-similar to the way
aren't going to be effected didn't in which stars are formed.
seem to have any plans in the first If Jupiter is contracting, this
place. A typical case ran some- might mean that when the solar
thing like this: system formed, the planet was
"Is the fuel shortage going to meant to be a star, but something
affect your vacation plans?" went wrong and it became a great
"Hope." gaseous planet instead.
"Why?"
"I don't have any."

A SUPPER SEMINAR ON
"CHILE: THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES"
SPEAKERS:
ELIANA LOVELUCK, from Chile
JEAN and CHARLES ROONEY, Members of the Interna-
notional Justice and Peoce Commission of the Archdiocese
of Detroit. Visited Chile in the summer, 1973
Supper-$1.00 Reservations: 662-5529
AT THE
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER
921 CHURCH STREET

"Well, if you were to drive some-'
where would you drive 50?"
"Nope."
"And why not?"
"I don't drive."

a new morning presentation by the friends of newsreel

Ann Arbor film weekend December 7-8

F R IDAY
Warren Beatty and Julie Christie in Robert Altman's
McCABE AND M S. MLLER
"Perfectly fantastic."-N.Y. Times. "A beautiful m o v i e."-New Yorker.
"Brilliant."-Judith Crist. "I don't expect to see a better movie this year."
-Nat'l Observer. "A masterpiece. "-Andrew Sarris. "The most important
movie since Bonnie-& Clyde."-Washington Post. Worth seeing again, and
again, and again and

SATURDAY
Charles Chaplin and Martha Raye

M.

VERDOUX

Charlie Chaplin as Bluebeard, and the honorary Green Beret Martha Raye as
one of his most unwilling victims . . . Incredible comedy. "Engrossingly para-
doxical and wry film, screamingly funny . . ."-New York Times.

It's a spewing smoke-
stack. It's litter in the
streets. It's a river where
fish can't live.
You know what pollu-
tion is.
But not everyone does.
So the next time you see
pollution, don.t close your
eyes to it.
Write a letter. Make a
call. Point itoutto someone
who can do something
about it.
People

D.H. Lawrence

Robert Morley as
OSCAR
WILDE
Oscar Wilde was highly con-
troversial as a Broadway play,
and even more so as a film.
"Morley is superb as the fop-
pish, arrogant Wilde in a con-
sistently sterling c a s t. They

THE FOX
Anne Heywood
Sandy Dennis
Keir Dullea
A story of intense entangled
human relationships. The sym-
bolism has been handled with
rare delicacy."-Post

,

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