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December 06, 1973 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-12-06

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Thursday, December 6, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Sven

Thursday, December 6, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Wallace: a politician changing
with the winds over 11 years

By LLOYD TIMBERLAKE
NEW YORK (Reuter)-Alabama
Governor George Corley Wallace,
who crowned a black homecoming
queen at the University of Alabama
recently, is the same Wallace who
almost 11 years ago told his fol-
lowers: "Segregation now, segre-
gation tomorrow, segregation for-
ever."
There have been other changes
in Wallace's life since then. When
he recently received a standing
ovation from the Southern Associa-
tion of Black Mayors-an organ-
ization which did not exist 11 years
ago-he spoke from a wheelchair,
the result of an attempt on his life
in Maryland during a presidential
primary 18 months ago.
The other major change is the
fact that the governor was running
in presidential primaries-and win-
ning many-at all. In the early
1960's the small, scrappy Wallace
appeared destined to follow the

fhotstens of other southern go'er-
nors who captured national head-
lines briefly by blocking school-
house doors to black children, then
dropped from sight.
Yet in 1968, running on a third
party ticket, Wallace captured 12
per cent of the national vote.
In 19~2 his attacks on the busing
of school children to achieve racial
integration had President Nixon
paying close attention to his
"southern strategy" and the Demo-
cratic candidates leaning more to
the right than they would have
liked.
Can he now, from a wheelchair,
run a national campaign? And if
he tries, how will he handle the
race issue?
To re-emerge on the national
scene, the governor, state law now
allowing him to succeed himself,
must win big in the 1974 Alabama
gubernatorial race.
Few doubt that he will run. He

Price of oil to be
hiked 2c per gallon

1:rks fit, althxugh he has t ken to'
wearing the hearing aid he hasz
re ded for years. Ile comes intot
his office daily in the afternoons.
And, most important, his aides for
months have been making contacts
to raise the money for such a race.+
At present, only State Senator
G ne McLain, has announced
against him and McClain is given
little chance to dethrone Wallace.
Of more immediate concern is a
highway funds scandal, in which1
the governor's brother Gerald has
been linked in the press to a deal
which allegedly involves $100,000
paid to a phoney machinery com-I
pany on the basis of state purchas-
ing orders.
A grand jury was to begin hear-
ings on the case in mid-December.
Should the scandal explode, other
candidates are sure to jump into
the race against Wallace.
But there is more sneculation in
the state over how Wallace will
handle the race issue than over
how he will handle the funds alle-
gations. He has weathered scan-
dals before.
If Wallace is looking toward the
19~6 presidential race, it might be
with some optimism. If the Re-
piblicans are still reeling from
Watergate, if the Democrats have
not recovered from the carnage
of the McGovern campaign, if the
energy crisis has put the "man on
the street" actually on the street-
out of his car and out of his job-
then the basic Wallace speech, an
attack on a sinister, expensive and
bumbling "big government," could
find a receptive audience across
the nation.
As for the governorship, Wallace
may decide by 1974 the "bloc vote"
is too big a reality to be on the
wrong side of. In a stormy political
career, Wallace has been accused
of many things, but never of being
a less than shrewd campaigner.
But right now, for every Ala-
h a'uuan-white or black-who no-
ticed that Wallace crowned the
black homecoming queen, and call-
ed her "beautiful," another noticed
he did not kiss her, a marked de-
parture in the usual political ap-
proach to babies and homecoming
queens.

Daily Offi"al B"lletin
T7ihrsda'v. December 6
DAY CALENDAR
Russian. E. European Studies: A.
M er. disc.. "Comminist Revolu ions
& C(lt ral Change." 200 Lane Hall.
MHRI. Cotpuier & Comm. Sci.: L.
F-annn. Case Western Reserve U. "Ar-
tificial Intelligence & Natural Stupid-
ity," Rackham Arnph.. 3:45 pm.
Suelear Physics: DGlo.
Nuclear Physics: D. Gloeckner. Ar-
gonne Nat'l Lab. "Shell Model Calcula-
tions in the A-90 Region," P-A Bldg.
Collcq. Rim. 4 pm.
Russian,C . Em. Studies: L. Pastu-
siak. Acad. of Sci., Poland, mini-course,
"American Culture: Views from the
Outside." E. Conf. Rm., Rackham. 4
pm.
Chemical Engrg.: N. Sweed, Prince-
ton U. "Parametric Pumping Separa-
tions," 1042 E. Engin., 4 pm.
Kelsey Museum Classical Studies: E.
Turner, U of London, "'Menander, Mo-
saics & Papyri," 2009 Angell Hall. 4:10
pn.
Architecture & Des.: I. Forsyth. D.
Kirkpatrick, 'Women as Art Patron-
nesses." Arch Aud., 4:15 pm.
Music School: Flute Student Recital,
Cady Mus. Rm., Stearns Bldg.. 4:45
pm.
Music School: Percussion Ensemble,

C. Owen, conductor, SM Rehearsal
Hall. 5 pm.
Int'l Night: Russian food, League
cafeteria, 5 pm.
Speech. Comnmunication: M. Knapp,
Purdue U. "Nonverbal Communication:
Trends, Fads. & Future." w. Conf.
Rm., Rackham, 7 pm.
Women's Studies: J. Mitchell, British
<o-ial critic, author of Women's Es-
ate. Rickhan Amph., 8 pm.
R ssan, E. Eur. Studies: mini-
course. "American Culture: Views from
the Outside." L. Pastusiak, 206 Lane
t1ail. 8 pmn.
Univ. Players: Shakespeare's "Cym-
beline." Trueblood Theatre, Frieze, 8
pmll
Music School: Univ: Chamber Choir
& Philharmonic, T. Hilbish, conduc-
tor, Hil And., 8 pin.
Res. College Singers: Christmas Con-
rcr. N. Cafeteria. RC, 8 pm.
Music School: Jazz Band. E. Smith,
conductor, Rackham Aud.. 8 pm.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 SAB
For graduate study in International
Relations, $5000 fellowship at U. of
Manitoba, Canada. Apply before Jan.
18. Details at CP&P.
45 fellowships of $3600-$5000 for stu-
dents who have completed I yr. of
grad. work in any of 65 academic areas,
available at U. of Alberta, Canada. 35
scholarships from $2500-$3600 for be-
ginning grad. students.
Seniors of Scottish descent may ap-
ply for a $3750 scholarship for grad.

study in Scotland, any field. Apply
before Jan. 15. Details available in this
office.
Annual Burke Marketing Research
Fellowship Award for undergraduate
students interested in marketing res.
Fellowship combines grad. study in
mktg at the U. of Cincinnati with
training. Check with this office for
test dates and applic. info. Need to
apply by Jan. 1 and/or Mar. 1.
Seniors who want to teach but have
no teaching certif., many univs. Offer
a Master of Arts inTeaching leg. For
details come t~o the C.P. & P. lib. Re-
cently received program details include:
biol. and gen. sci. teaching at U. of
Ili.: elementary and secondary level
teaching at Northwestern U.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
3200 SAB, 763-41I7
Students: Need a job during the Holi-
lays? 7-Up Bottling Co., roseville, Mi.,
has opening for 10 or 12. Details avail-
able.
The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, Oh.
Summer Internship Program for jour-
nalism students in junior yr. Appli-
cations accepted between Jan. 1 and
March 1. Further details avail.

U'

- TONITE -
niversity Players presents

SFuel crisis got you down?
Upset over the Rose Bowl decision?
Iroubled by the lima bean
shortage in Montana?
Well, relief is on the way!
MICHIGAN GARGOYLE
MICHIGAN STUDENT HUMOR MAGAZINE
ON SALE DECEMBER 11

IDOUBLE FEATURE
MEATBALL &
TEENAGE COWGIRLSI
I' I II *: II

(Continued from Page 1)
members.
f The American Petroleum In-
stitute survey reported an expected
increase in operable petroleum re-
fining capacity of 3.5 per cent by
next Sept. 30 because of increased
refining facilities.
TIME PROBE into prices charged
by truck stop operators was seen
as a partial response to traffic tie-
ups on major highways caused by
truck drivers protesting the high
price of diesel fuel and lower
speed limits.
Council deputy director James
McLane said that where price vio-
lations are found, truck stop opera-

tors will be required to roll back
their prices to the legal level and
refund amounts they have over-
charged.
The price adjustments for heat-
ing oil and gasoline are designed
to make it equally profitable for
refiners to produ.ce heating oil.
Traditionally, gasoline has been the
more profitable product.
COUNCIL DIRECTOR John Dun-
lop said the council will announce
incentives next week to encourage
refiners to produce more heating
oil.
The two-cent increase will repre-
sent a se'en per cent hike over the
present heating oil price of about
28 cents per gallon, Dunlop said.

CYMBELI NE
its 000th production!
by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
December 5-8 at 8:00 P.M.
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE
Box office 12:30-4:30, 5:30-8:00
Informoton 764-5387

Le]

j

Join The Daily Staff

SENIOR CITIZENS GUILD
502 W. HURON STREET
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS BAZAAR
rN oand BAKESALE
FRIDAY, DEC. 7, 9:30 A.M.-8 P.M.
Hand-knit Evening Garments
Hand-made Patchwork Pillows
Hand-painted Jewelry
Stuffed Toys
Baked goods from old fashioned recipes
HOT LUNCH SERVED FROM 11:30 A.M.
REASONABLE PRICES '
!1IIF
'IM_______ ___ 3 _____a_____ d'_____________________________ S

TONIGHT! ISREL NOW!
Beginning at 7:00 p.m.-Informal workshop with returnees from pro-
grams in Israel, including Sherut Lca'am, Kibbutz, universities, Hebrew
study.
at 8:00 p.m.-
EMIL FACKENHElM
PROF. OF PHILOSOPHY, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
One of the world's most distinguished Jewish philosophers
SPEAKS ABOUT
"THE MEANING OF ISRAEL FOR THE JEWISH PEOPLE"
FOLLOWED BY
HEDVA & DAVID
Popular Israeli singers who won 1st prize in Int'l Pop Scng Fest at EXPO Toyko

THURSDAY:

Thursday, Dec. 6

Michigan Union Ballroom

imbo

S

LT

'Si

I

4
I
-]T

Where the ACTION is

Si

ngles

Night

Meet new friends drinking
DOUBLE MIXED DRINKS
for the price of a single
ALL PIZZAS % Price from 9 to 1!1
(no carryout at discount)

Bernard could
sleep later and save gas!
Whether you've been studying or partying the night before, you
could forget the rush hour hassle and enjoy a few extra winks each
morning at our place. If you're involved in campus activities, you
can walk to meetings instead of driving. Save your gas money for

Entertainment-Dancing

No Admission Charge

11

11

li$l

I

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