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December 06, 1973 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1973-12-06

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Thursday, December 6, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

ThurdayDecmber6, 173 HE MCHIGN DILY age hre

Javitz
may call
for Nixon
to resign
WASHINGTON (3) - Sen. Ja-
cob Javits said yesterday the
approaching confirmation of Ger-
ald Ford as vice president mov-
ed to the "front" consideration
for President Nixon's resignation.
With Ford's expected confirm-
ation by the House Thursday, the
New York Republican said, every
Republican must also take into
consideration the "suffering" of
the party under the charges level-
ed against Nixon on Watergate.
WHEN FORD'S confirmed he
said, the "consideration of re-
signation or any call for resig-
nation will properly come to the
front and in such a context I
and others will have to give
every thoughtful consideration to
that possibility."
"It is clear that the Repub-
lican Party, without being direct-
ly implicated in Watergate, is
nonetheless suffering because of
these charges and this must give
every Republican added concern
as it relates toathe issue of re-
signation," he added.
The fact that Ford is 'at
home' with the domestic and in-
ternational policies espoused by
President Nixon contributes to
the propriety and practicality of
such consideration as Ford's pos-
sible succession to the presidency
would not negate the voters'
mandate of 1972."
JAVITS SAID that inquiries in
his own state show that "charges
against the President are reflect-
ing on the party."
He also said the House Judi-
ciary Committee "should report
yes or no on a bill of impeach-
ment within 60 to 90 days and
the House . . . should then vote
by roll call on the impeachment
resolution up or down."
Asked how such a bill might
fit into constitutional language
for impeachment on grounds of
high crimes and misdemeanors,
Javits said any House bill of
impeachment "is what they make
it."
ASKED ABOUT Nixn's effort
to inform members of Congress
on his side of the Watergate
charges, Javits said, "It's been
a good try."
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 75
Thursday, December 6, 1973
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. rews phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
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Summer session published Tuesday
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states and foreign).

38 STATES OF AMERICA
CASCA11 ITTEIRSSY INS RON DAKOTA SUPERIOR DEARBORRNENEE
IBONNEVILL! SAN LOIS PLATTE MACKINAC KENNEREC
PRAIRIE MOAW""N
- APPAWACASH
----.SUSQUEHANNA
a r---- 2,LCHESAPEAKE
' .----~- -~~ALEMARLE
CUMBRLAND
CAROLINA
PIEDMNT
SAN GABR-EL- ISAIE
SEMRD A .LABE GO
li COCRISE WE ALAM O AUK\ -ISCY
, Et el K ILAUCA a r Ao eo f g A y
1 y~~n .,
G.Ez PacA "pfessKor of getgraphy a C alfriaSae
University, has figured out a way to save the United States 4.6
billion dollars annually in state government expenses, just make
the fifty states into thirty-eight. He explains his plan in an article
in the current issue of Smithsonian Magazine.
FIGHTING CONTINUES:
batte for Kien Due

Arab countries use energy crisis

in identifying friends,

BEIRUT, (A) - An old Arab
saying goes: "The friend of my
enemy is my enemy and the ene-
my of my enemy is my friend."
Many nations have suddenly
learned the meaning of it -
through the energy crisis.
The Arabs have already iden-
tified their enemies, beside Is-
rael. TheUnited States, and the
Netherlands, Portugal, Rhodesia,
and South Africa are under a to-
tal oil embargo.
THE UNITED STATES lost its
oil because it sent arms to Is-
rael and appropriated $2.2 billion
for aid to the Jewish state dur-
ing the October war.
The Dutch lost their oil be-
cause their foreign minister
made pro-Israelitstatements,
their defense minister was pho-
tographed at a pro-Israeli rally.
The oil boycott was extended
to South Africa, Rhodesia and
Portugal on the grounds that
their white regimes are to black
Africa what Israel is to the
Arabs. So far this year about 20
black African states have brok-
en relations with Israel to sup-
port the Arab cause, and in re-
turn they asked the Arabs to
strike a blow for their cause.
THE ARABS are still trying to
decide who their friends are.
To spur the selection process,
they have cut oil production 25
per cent with the promise of fu-
ture 5 per cent monthly cut-
backs until Israel withdraws
from occupied Arab territory
and the Middle East conflict is
settled.
Saudi Arabia's oil minister,
Ahmed Zaki Yamani, has made
it clear that "countries friendly
to us will get the same amount
of oil as before, while the neu-
trals will get less."
Thus, the 25 per cent cutback
through November saw favored
nations like the black African
states get first whack at the re-
maining 75 per cent, while neu-
trals had to share what was left.
JAPAN AND EUROPE, the

Arabs' biggest oil customers,
were hardest hit.
European Common Market
countries, excluding the Neth-
erlands, won a reprieve from the
S per cent December cutback af-
ter they issued a joint statement
calling for Israeli withdrawal
from occupied Arab land and re-
cognition of the "legitimate
rights of the Palestinian people."
Japan, Singapore and the
Philippines followed suit and
were likewise rewarded by the
Arabs.
BUT THERE is still next year.
Yamani, now in the United
States, has said that Saudi Ara-
bia will extend the exemption to
Britain, France and Spain
through January. Other coun-
tries, especially Japan, will have
to do more to prove their friend-
ship, tightening the economic
blockade around Israel.

Saudi Arabia has taken the
lead in Arab oil policy. But so
far there is only partial agree-
ment among oil producing states
on how to use their cutbacks-
who is friendly? What ratio of
oil should be allotted for what
degrees of friendship?
KUWAIT FEELS that only
Spain is friendly enough to get
an uninterrupted flow of oil and
disagrees with Saudi Arabia
about Britain and France. Abu
Dhabi agrees on Britain and
France but favors Japan over
Spain.
Since Abu Dhabi produces far
less oil than Saudi Arabia, Ja-
pan has been short-changed up
to now. Other countries like
West Germany and Italy and
Scandinavia aren't even on any-
body's list yet.

"
nemies
The Arab summit conference
in Algiers voted to appoint a
committee of oil ministers charg-
ed with drawing up a unified list
of friends and enemies. But
even this will not insure total
unanimity among Arab oil pro-
ducing countries.
LEFTIST IRAQ, which also
boycotted the summit, is not ex-
porting oil to the Arab enemies.
But it has refused to curtail pro-
duction and penalize the neu-
trals. The Baghdad government
needs its oil revenues and ad-
vocates nationalization of foreign
oil companies as a more effec-
tive weapon against Israel's sup-
porters.
Iraqi wells are pumping away
and Iraqi crude is selling at re-
cord prices.

SAIGON (AP) - South Vietna-
mese troops backed by bombers
launched a counteroffensive yes-
terday to retake a district capi-
tal and ease North Vietnamese
pressure on a provincial capital,
field reports said.
The action to retake Kien Duc,
a district town 12 miles west of
Gia Nghia, capital of Quang Duc
Province, apparently had the ap-
proval of President Nguyen Van
Thieu under standing Saigon poli-
cy to retake all territory lost to
the Communist side since the
January cease-fire.
IN WASHINGTON, Pentagon
spokesman Jerry Friedheim
said despite the increased pace
of the fighting, U. S. officials do
not anticipate the start of a na-
tionwide offensive.
It widened the battle of more
than a month near the Cambo-
dian border for control of stra-
tegic supply routes leading south-
ward to Saigon, about 100 miles
away. Some South Vietnamese
sources see the central highlands
fighting as a prelude to a gen-
eral North Vietnamese offensive
next year.
A MESSAGE said intensified
North Vietnamese and Viet Cong
attacks across South Vietnam
and Viet Cong attacks across
South Vietnam and the influx of

100,000 fresh troops since the
cease-fire "is a confirmation of
the Communists' intention to
launch a new offensive in South
Vietnam."
Kien Duc, about 90 miles north-
east of Saigon, was the fourth
government position to fall since
Nov. 1.
All four positions lie along
Highway 14. The North Vietna-
mese need a 25-mile section of
the road from Dak Song south-
ward to Kien Duc to complete
a 400-mile all-weather road net-
work stretching from the demili-
tarized zone.
COMPLETION of the network
would facilitate the flow of war
materiels and troops.

GIFTS
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1973 IN
REVIEW
States, Cities
Civil Rights
Crime
Fiscal Affairs
Geography

Weather
Foreign Relations
History
Sports
Religion
Homes
Arts

Finances
Awards.
Industry
Labor
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I

Arabs often claim that they are
not anti-semites because they
are semites. That is irrelevant
because anti-semitism histori-
cally and unversally means
hatred of Jews and nothing
else. A n t i s e m i ti c literature
abounds in the Arab world to-
day and its main function ap-
pears to be the cultivation and
maintenance of popular hatred
toward Israel.
A substantial portion of this
antisemitic campaign s t e m s
from continued Arab-Nazi col-
laboration since WW 11. The
leaders of the Palestinian Arabs
(Hai Amin el Husseini, Fawsi
el Hawkii, Wase.f Kamal) were
in Berlin since 1941. They
helped to organize Muslim SS-
units in the Balkan which help-
ed to liquidate Jews and par-
tisans.
Furthermore, hundreds of lead-
ing Nazis have been and are
working in Egypt and Syria in
prominent positions. Some ex-
amples: SS-General Oskar Dir-
lewanger, murderer of tens of
thousands of J e w s in the
Ukraine, was the commander of
Nasser's bodyguard (now called
Hai Amin).
Dr. Heinrich Willerman, the
Nazi doctor who cruelly experi-
mented on human bodies in the
Dachau concentration camp, is
the commander of the Samarra
camp in Egypt. And the head
of the Gestapo in Poland, Leo-
pold Gleim, is now (under the
nam of Ali el Nacher) the head
of the political police in Egypt.
Finally, the "Institute for Re-
search on Zionism" in Cairo is
a profuse source of onti-semitic
propaganda; its founder and di-
rector was Goebbels' assistant
Dr. J. Von Leers (died in
1965).
A r a b governments cooperate
throughout the world with neo-
Nazi organizotions I i k e the
British National Socialist move-
nent, Tacuara (Argentina)
and newspapers like the "Deut-
sche Soldaten Se.itung" (Ger-
many). Many of these organi-
zations are subsidized by Egypt.
The Palestinian terrorist groups
also have Nazi links. E-Fatah
uses Nazi recruiters (Karl Van
der Put in Belgium and Johann
Schuller. an ex-Nazi living in
Rome). The commanded of a
PFLP comp in Basra is a for-
m-r SS-officer (E. Alten) .
Wkin nurA of Iona :.-is .n

Durng 1968 and 1968, an in-
ternational commission of edu-
cators, established under the
authority of the director-gen-
eral of UNESCO to examine
textbooks used by Arab refu-
gee children in schools financed
by UN Relief and Works
Agency, recommended that 65
of the 127 books examined be
"modified" and that, 14 be
withdrawn f r o m use entirely.
The objectionable books were
so judged because they distort-
ed history, openly incited vio-
lence, or employed "the de-
plorable language of anti-sem-
itism."
The commission's initial report
noted t h a t "special mention
should be made of students' ex-
ercises which are often inspired
by a preoccupation with indoc-
trination against J e w s rather
than by s t r i c t I y educational
aims."
When the director-general of
UNESCO approached the Arab
governments to c or r e c t the
books, he got the following an-
swer from the Syrian minister
of education Sule.iman - Al -
Khash (A' Thaura 3.5.68) :
"The hatred which we indoc-
trinate into the minds of our
children is sacred."
The implications of such Arab-
Nazi cooperation are that Israel
must take Arab declarations of
intended extermination very se-
riously. Such genocidal threats
are not mere rhetorical exer-
cises, but the expression of a
Hilterian-type racism, w h i c h
still strongly thrives in Arab
lands. The Jewish people lost
six mililon people in World War
It for failing to take Hitler se-
rious'y: Israel cannot be blamed
for taking the Arabs at their
word.
Quite apart from Arab anti-
semitism, it is, worthwhile ex-
amining other forms of Arab
racism which ordinarily do not
receive sufficient public atten-
tion. The Arabs as a people
have one of the worst historical
records on racism known to hu-
manity, h a v i n g engaged in
widespread persecution of non-
Arab minorities as well as in
the wholesale trading of black
Africans to slavery.
(The reader is encouraaed to
look up the section on "Slav-
erv" in the Encyclopedia Brit-
tonica w h i c h describes how
Ar nh msave-traers ,as reently

and Sudan--all the slaves are
black Africans. It should also
be mentioned that Egyptian pi-
lots helped in the bombing of
Biafra, thereby aiding in the
massacre of well over a million
lbos. In Sudan, a war is raged
against the blacks of the three
southern provinces of Sudan.
Until 1970, the government
ruled by northern Arabs killed
500,000 blacks, expelled or
k i I I e d all missionaries (the
blacks are Christian or pagan
as opposed to the Muslim
Arabs), murdered the black
leader William Dang, and took
away all land from the blacks
in areas occupied by the Arab
northerners. Hundreds of thou-
sands of blacks from Sudan
fled to northern Uganda. Even
Arnold Toynbee attacked Arab
colonialism in the Sudan (Play-
boy, April 1967).
In Egypt, the five million Copts,
who are the bona fide descen-
dants of the ancient Egyptians,
are discriminated against in
employment.
In Syria, there is fierce perse-
cution of the Kurds who, as a
M u s I i m non-Arab minority,
have no right to vote because
they do not speak Arabic. They
have no right to be Syrian cit-
izens for the same reason. It is
forbidden for Kurds to own land
or to be employed in the public
service or elsewhere. They are
not allowed to learn in high
schools (neither Arab nor
Kurdish high schools) or to be
taught in the Kurdish language.
Tens of thousands of them are
deported and dispersed in order
to break their majority position
in Djazireh.
In Iraq, a similar war against
the two million Kurds was
waged between 1943 up to the
present time. Since 1958, at
least seven agreements between
the Kurds and the government
were signed. All were broken
by Bagdad. In the meantime,
40,OOQ Kurds w e r e expelled
from the suburbs of Kirkuk,
240 villages w e r e destroyed,
poisonous gas was used, and
hundreds of thousands w e r e
killed.
The above facts are especially
interesting in the light of Arab
propaganda tactics to depict Is-
rael as colonialist and white in
order to gain the support of
Africans and black Americans.

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