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September 06, 1973 - Image 82

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six
prn GOkunD L r, r
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I
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u<><><><><><-0 -

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 6. 1573

..... ...... , .. .-I-.- ...-. -, vi

.1

'Reform

school'

By MARILYN RILEY
Controversial Ann Arbor School
Board trustee Cecil Warner has
proposed a plan-termed the "re-.
form school'' by its opponents--
under w h i c h students deemed
"disruptive" would be segregated
in an "alternative" school.
Expected to come up for a
School Board vote July 18, the
plan, according to Warner, would
allow public school teachers who
now "spend all their time work-
ing with disruptive kids" to pay
more attention to other students.

The superintendent's office has
determined staffing and program
needs of the proposed facility and
designed criteria for assigning
"disruptive" s t u d e n t s to the
school. The resulting plan, if
passed, will go into effect in
September.
Wlat prompted Warner's pro-
posal? According to the School
Board member, his years of ob-
servation in the schools have con-
vinced him that there "needs to
be a place for kids who just

can't operate in a normal school
environment."
But according to Bill Stewart,
public information officer for Ann
Arbor schools, the School Board
has experienced a "great deal of
community pressure" to remove
the disruptive kids for the benefit
of the rest of the students.
This pressure bas resulted from
the continuing increase of crime

plan stirs
develop the skills of the individ
ual students. Those who are '1et
reading up to their grade level
will be given extra remedial hen,
if it seems they will benefit by
it.
Those who haven't been able to
improve in spite of extra help
will be "helped toward an area
of vocational training rather than
academic training" so they will

debate

j

Be careful with fire:
There are babes
inthe woods.
4-
Y

Why you
should
buy US Y
f Continued from Page 1)
Press and Reuter (an English-
based international news serv-
ice) we also offer full coverage
bf national and international af-
fairs.
This year we are introducing
a number of reforms in our Cir-
culation Department in an ef-
fort to improve delivery service
to our readers.
Beginning this week a full-
time secretary will be on hand
during business hours to. take
subscription orders and handle
complaints.
F U R T H E R, a mechanical
telephone answering service will
soon make it possible for Daily
customers to leave messages
with us 24 hours a day.
We're looking forward to pro-
viding our readers this fall with
a better newspaper and better
service.
Last winter the New York
Times called The Michigan
Daily one of the two "most
aggressive and professional"
college papers in the nation.
BUY a subscription and find
out why.
C if
thru

"Wdrner says that one goal of the alternative
school will be to 'socialize' those who don't
show respect for other people and their prop-
erty.
.-..rr : ....

e

in the schools, culminating early
in May with the stabbing of a
Tappan Junior High student.
Warner says that one goal of
the alternative school will be to
"socialize" those who don't show
respect for other people and
their property.
He emphasizes the socialization
goal is "not a racial thing."
"There are lots of white kids in
school that have not been social-
ized," he explains.
As Warner sees it, use of a
weapon or assaulting a teacher
could be grounds for immediate
assignment to the school. More
general disturbances in class and
hallways would have to be con-
sidered in light of the student's
past history.
The other major goal of the
school, says Warner, would be 3

leave school with a marketable
skill.
Warner sees his plan as on
alternative to the present situa-
tion where a student is repeatedly
suspended until he gets tired of
it and quits. Without a diploma or
a skill, the dropout may end up
on welfare or in prison, notes
Warner.
The proposal has been receive)
with skepticism and outright con-
demnation from more liberal ele-
ments of the community. Wendy
Wilson, student representative or
the School Board, called it "a
lousy idea" which is "not going
to help anything,"
Larry Stewart, president of thc
Teachers Association, says that
on the whole, School Board a.:-
tions seem to reflect "a shit*
from prevention . to punishment e
of offenders."

Daily Photo by ROLFE TESSEM
Cecil Warner

I

Soviet

Dope law

I

RC, Women's Studies
units get new directors

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE
ULRICH'S GUARANTEE:
IF OUR PRICES ARE NOT COMPETITIVE-A FULL REFUND
WILL BE GIVEN as long as the item is RETURNED within
TWO WEEKS with CASH REG. RECEIPT-ITEM MUST BE
IN SAME CONDITION AS PURCHASED.
ULRI"H FU P T SOPTE
"A FUN PLACE TO SHOP"

Soie
diss ident crackdo~wn
expected
(Continued from Page 1)

(Continued from Page 1)
plans to review the'RC's concen-
tration programs, but saidl his
work will consist of a "steady pro-
cess of continuing to justify what is
needed in the way of innovative
and bold approaches."
Having taught in the RC during
the 1968-69 school year, Orlin said
he intends to continue teaching and
is not contemplating a career ad-
ministrative post.
The Women's Studies Program is
p~resently moving to a new office in
the LSA building, where it will set
up a library of unpublished papers,
books, bibliographies; tapes, films,
and files on resource people and!
speakers. "We want people to use

our offices and to use our mater-
ial," said former program co-ordi-
nator Lydia Kleiner yesterday.
KLEINER, co-ordinator of teach-'
ing fellows for last year's intro-'
ductory women's studies program,
will be one of seven teaching fel-
lows granted by LSA for thisj
year's Women Studies 240 (Intro-
duction to Women's Studies).
The program will also offer Wo-
men's Studies 340. and 440, Inter-E
disciplinary Perspectives on Wo-
men and Research on Women. In
addition the program will host the
first statewide conference of the
Michigan Women's Studies Associa-
tion Nov. 9.

I

(Continued from Page 1)
Although the Soviet Academy of
Sciences has about 250 members,
so far only about 50 have signed
the protest. But other letters from
writers, artists, workers and farm-
ers reach a much higher total.
SAKHAROV has been interro-
gated by a Soviet law officer and
his name was mentioned during
last week's trial of two former
rebels, Pytor Yakir and Viktor
Krasin, who 'were sentenced to
three years prison and three years;
exile.
Yesterday Shafarevitch said
Sakharov was being condemned
because he spoke of the "vices and
sores of our society with the per-
sistence and selflessness typical of
the best representatives of the
Russian people."
"His conscience made h i in
speak. He could not keep silent .. .
are we to believe that we are liv-
ing in a paradise where there are
no sores or vices?"
Be careful with fire:
There are babes
in the woods.

i

OEM"

Join The Daily
CIRCULATION DEPT.
Come in any afternoon

DWN

Krasny said he considered mari-
iuana use by 5000 or more of the
15,000 people anticipated at the
festival to be "an uncontrollable
situation" but added that such
widespread use would not alone be
eno'ieh to dictate a massive influx
of police. He said a callup of coun-
tv or state reinforcements is "not
likely" unless the festival becomes
a "disorderly gathering."
Washtenaw County Sheriff Fred
Postill yesterday told the Daily his
department woulld "gladly cooper-
ate" with the city police but "will
not aid" in the control of mari-
juana use.
"WE NEVER charge anybody
(with mariiuana offenses)," Pos-
till said. "If we come across small
amounts of the stuff, we'll just dis-
pose of it."
.Krasny appeared to equivocate
in separate statements on plans to
"se nlainclothes police at the fes-
tivTa. He stated Monday that un-
┬▒orcovermen would circulate in the
crowd "looking mainly for the hard
stuff." But in yesterday's inter-
view, the chief told'The Daily, "I
don't anticipate assigning any
plainclothesmen. Of course, I can't
say for sure. If a problem devel-
ons; we'll have to change our tac-
tics."
Krasny boasted that Ann Arbor,
unlike many cities, has a record
of relatively neaceful youth-orient-
ed music festivals.
"WE'D LIKE TO keep it that
way," he said. "No one wants to
have peace at this thing more than
I do."
Human Rights Party City Coun-
cilman Jerry DeGrieck was fast
and furious in responding to Ste-
phenson and Krasny's warnings.
DeGrieck yesterday issued a .state-
ment branding the two men "hypo-
crites and liars."
Festival sponsor Peter Andrews
of Rainbow Multi-Media Corp. was
unavailable for comment last night
on the possibility of numerous drug
arrests at the three-day gathering
at Otis Spann field.

r

420 Maynard

H

D

A

Anfl

Ar-bor

I.

olU

" Aew 6sing cow ba" o h pub~cgoot,

at Otis Spann field.

Overbeck
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