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December 04, 1973 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1973-12-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, December 4, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, December 4, 1973

GENEVA CONFERENCE SLATED

Professional

Theatre Program

AP Photo
ISRAELI DEFENSE MINISTER Moshe Dayan attending the funeral oration for former Premier
David Ben Gurion in Jerusalem.
SEVERE ENERGY CRISIS:
Viet Cong attack on Saigon
oil reserve destroys fuel

Mid-East,
confer on
By AP and Reuter ry Kissin
Prime Minister Golda M e i r visit Isras
and Foreign Minister Abba Eban during a
held talks in Jerusalem yester- last min
day with American Under-Secre- the confe
tary of State Kenneth Rush as to be an
part of the diplomatic drive to Sion inJ
find a peace settlement in the Arab d
Middle East. Londoni
Rush formally came to Jeru- also will
salem yesterday to attend 1 h e a second
funeral of David Ben Gurion, this mon
founding father of the modern the Gen
state of Israel, but meetings were Syria h
quickly arranged with Israeli ed its w
leaders, government sources said. the dipl
.Presiden
DURING THE TALKS, Rush is puttingt
expected to try to clarify the pre- priate
sent Middle East situation, and private.
particularly ways of reviving the THE1
deadlocked military-level talks Kissinger
with Egypt on the separation and would b
disengagement of front-line fore- becausel
es. formal d:
Meir is likely to seek clarifica- Syria sin
tion from Rush of a report in yes- r
terday's New York Times that Kis singer
the Nixon administration has dd- tour.
cided it must put pressure on
Israel to make significant con- Diplon
!cessions at the proposed Arab- ington s,
Israeli peace conference in Gen- five nal
eva.
The conference is teatatively TI
scheduled for December 18th. volu
Tue
THE MILITARY-LEVEL talks, isediteda
at Kilometer 101 on the Cair- 4-056. S
Suez Road, were broken off by Ann Arbor
Egypt five days ago. The Egyp- daily Tues
tians accused Israel of stalling during the
accse nard Street
on the question of a front-line subscripti
withdrawal. pus area);
But Israeli leaders have voiced Ohio);1
and foreig
hopes the talks will be resumed summer
since they could be of benefit to through S
both sdes. ion rates:
both sides area); $6.5
Rush's meeting with Meir and Ohio); $7
Eban are part of a series of con- states and
tacts between Israeli and U.S.
officials on the American-spon-
sored ceasefire agreement and
the Geneva Conference, sponsor-
ed jointly by the United States DC
and the Soviet Union.
SECRETARY OF STATE Hen-

peace

nger is thought likely to
ael in the next two weeks
Middle East visit for
ute consultations before
erence. This is expected
nother topic for discus-
Jerusalem.
diplomats in Beirut and
reported that Kissinger
1 visit Syria as part of
Middle East tour later
th laying groundwork for
eva peace gathering.
has not publicly announc-
illingness to attend. But
omats in Beirut s aid
t Hafez Assad already is
together a delegatiox in
INFORMANTS said a
r visit to Damascus
e particularly significant
the United States has no
diplomatic relations with
nce 1967 and the Syrians
elieved to have turned
r down during his first
vatic sources in Wasa-
said Kissinger will visit
tions, including Saudi
FIE MICHIGAN VAILY
ame LXXXIV, Number 73
esday, December 4, 1973
and managed by students at
sity of Michigan News prone,
Second class postage paid atI
r, Michigan 48106. PublishedI
day through Sunday morning
,University year at 420 May-
t, Ann Arbor. Michigan 48104.
on rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
$11 local mail (Michigan and
2non-local mail (other states!
n).
session publishea Tuesdayj
saturday morning. Subscrip-
$5.50 by carrier (campus
50 local mail (Michigan and'
1.oo non-local mail ;other
foreign).

pact
Arabia. The call on King Faisal
indicated he will lobby with the
Saudi ruler to help relax t h e
Arab oil squeeze on countries
that support Israel.
It Cairo, Egyptian spokesper-
son Ahmed Anis told a news con-
ference that indirect diplomatic
contacts were underway between
Egypt and Israel to foster re-
sumption of the military 1 e v e 1
Kilometer 101 cease-fire talks.
"WE CAN EXPECT a result
perhaps in the immediate fu-
ture," Anis said. "We cannot de-
fine our stand regarding the
peace conference before the out-
come of these contacts is
known."
SUMMIT""
MEDICAL
CENTER
Free Pregnancy Testing
PROBLEM PREGNANCY
COUNSELING
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Approved by
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(313) 272-8450

U.S. leaders

SAIGON (P) - Viet Cong sabo-
teurs who sent much of South
Vietnam's biggest oil depot up in
smoke yesterday forced the gov-
ernment to impose more tough
measures to conserve already
short fuel supplies.
The dawn rocket and mortar
attack at Nha Be, six miles from
Saigon, was the closest to the
capital since the cease-fire 10
months ago. Military sources es-
timated up to half the country's
fuel' reserves burned.
FLAMES STILL licked into the
sky at nightfall and black clouds
from explosions and fires hung
over Saigon.
The government announced
in the wake of the attack that
gasoline will be rationed. Gas
stations, ordered closed just af-
ter the attack to prevent panic
buying, will reopen today. But
sales are banned on Saturdays
and Sundays.
The minister of trade and in-
dustry, Nguyen Duc Cuong, an-
nounced a wide range of other
fuel-conservation measures, in-
cluding a 35-mile-per-hour high-
way speed limit, a 50 per cent
cutback in street lighting and a
ban on advertising lights.
CUONG ALSO ordered an ad-
ditional 15 per cent cut in elec-
tricity use by government of-

fices, adding to a 25 per cent
cut decreed earlier.
Viet Cong spokesperson in
Saigon refused to comment on
the attack except to say they
had "seen the smoke but have
not received any report about it."
A U. S. source said the raid,
which reporterdly destroyed al-
most all the Shell fuel stored at
Nha Be, will create immense fuel
storage problems in the near fu-
ture. Shell is by far the largest
fuel supplier to South Vietnam,
with 60 per cent of the civilian
market.
BUT THE source said Caltex
and Esso storage facilities at the
tank farm were untouched.
Lt. Col. Le Trung ien, chief
spokesperson for the South Viet-
namese military command, said
the Nha Be facility stored fuel
for civilian use. Other sources
said fuel for military use also
was stored there.
Hien acknowledged the loss
would affect the armed forces.
But he claimed military re-
serves have not yet reached a
critical stage adding that the
armed forces normally maintain
a reserve supply of 30-60 days.
SOUTH VIETNAMESE mili-
tary sources said the attack
marked the first "Phase of what
they predicted would be a gener-

al offensive by the Viet Cong
and their North Vietnamese al-
lies during the height of the dry
season early next year.
U. S. and oil company sources
in Saigon said South Vietnamese
military fuel supplies no longer
are handled by Shell, Caltex and
Esso via Singapore refining fa-
cilities.
Unconfirmed reports indicated
military fuel supplies were be-
ing shipped directly from the
United States. A U. S. military
spokesperson declined comment,
saying sensitive negotiations
were in progress.
THE UNITED STATES funds
almost all fuel supplies for South
Vietnam, civilian and military.

6..

I

_ __

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OPEN 'TIL 1 P.M.
CARDS CANDLESJ
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Nature Cards, Recycled Cards Specially Designed
Old Fashioned Cards Holiday Wreaths
Many Languages Rings and Holders
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GIFTS-
European Hand-Carved Nativity Sets
Music Boxes and Bells
Imported Tree Trimmings and Stocking Stuffers
Replicas of Ancient Icons
STATIONERY GIFT PACKAGING
Tablets and Fold-overs Decorated Wrap
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i DSE X
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DUBLE FEA TURE
EAT BALL &
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OUBLE FEATURE
CLINIC GIRLS &
GH PRIESTESS
'U&HCINEMI

0

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LCOLM
IN

0

McDOWELL
directed by
LINDSAY
ANDERSON

Tonight only
Modern Languages
Aud. 3 7 and 9:15 p.m.

$1.25

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NOTE: Illustrated Man has been cancelled.
A Separate Peace will show on Thurs.only.

r" a.ls r{ {a.{ {i awV{" iVi VVVV
!\ a! !!! A!!!alA Al! "!ww!" "a!T!

1 31 N.WASNINGTON.YPSILANTI

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RC PLAY ERS
SPONSORS:
A Demonstration of a Work in Pro-
gress, by a group investigating new
directions in theatre.
DEC.7, 8, 9-8 P.M.
EAST QUAD AUDITORIUM
Donation $1.00

N/G/-/T.
Tuesday Dec 4
FAREWELL ANN ARBOR
PERFORMANCE

I

-1

1

by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
December 5-8, 1973
Trueblood Theatre
8:00 P.M.
TICKETS: $2.00-$3.00
TRUEBLOOD BOX OFFICE
DECE~MBER 3-8
Mon. & Tues. 12:30-5:00
Wed.-Sat. 12:30-4:30
5:30-8:0a
THE UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS
r-

IRIS BELL ADVENTURE
g 3rd STONE of the SUN
Wed-Thur Dec 5-6
MOJO Brooklyn
B1oogie & Blues
Band Busters

Fri-Sat-Sun

Dec 7-8-9

BARNABY-BYE
Am AboArt , rker Co-op
Christmo5 ART SALE
SATURDAY &SUNDAY YDec- 9 w Sa - 5 St arn2-6

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