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December 01, 1973 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1973-12-01

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Page Six

Saturday, December i. 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pagi Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,.. , . f. , ... .

Grapplers
42-3 Blue slaughter
largest 'M' total ever

Wim;

_ekers

decked

By CLARKE COGSDILL
The Michigan Mat Machine
roared into the new season with a
devastating 42-3 t r i u m p h over
Western Michigan's Broncos in at
dual meet at Crisler Arena last
night. The Wolverines' 42 points
setr a new record for the highest
score garnered by any Michigan t
wrestling team in dual meet com-
petition.
"I don't think the record's too
significant," a pleased Michigan
mentor Rick Bay remarked. "West-
ern's a very young team. But I was
pleasantly surprised by our aggres-
siveness."
THAT AGGRESSIVENESS includ-
ed four Maize and Blue pins, and
three victories by superior deci-
sion. "Everybody on our team
knows what you have to do to
win," commented Bronco coach
Geeorge Hobbs. "If you lost to a
team that's this good you can't
feel bad when you gave it every-
thing you got."
It took 118-pound Wolverine Jim
Brown 25 seconds to get his first
take-down off WMU's Paul Amell,
and it was all downhill from there
as the Akron, Ohio junior scored
an easy 16-5 superior decision.
Rich Valley's 6-0 triumph at 126
pounds over Don Daniel was not
so impressive on the scoreboard,
but quite impressive on the mat
as the Maize and Blue grappler
dominated his opponent completely.
Then the fireworks began. Bill
Davids charged off the bench like
one of Bo Schembechler's tackles
let loose in a Big Ten Athletic
Directors' meeting. Bronco Randy
Cotton was fortunate to hold out
for slightly more than three and a
half minutes.
BILL SCHUCK piled up a 14-0
point margin over opponent Ed
Hedgecock before mercifully ap-
plying the finisher at 4:54.
And Captain Jarrett Hubbard put
on a brilliant exhibition of wres-
tling virtuosity for two minutes
and 44 seconds before pinning
WMU's Mark Sands.
Junior-college transfer Dan Brink
mathematically clinched Michigan's
victory-as if there'd been any
doubtby destroying Gary Martin
20-6, including three near-falls.
AS EXPECTED, Western's Doug
Wyn, last year's runner-up at 167
pounds, defeated freshman Mark
Johnson. Nevertheless, Bay was
pleased at Johnson's performance
in defeat, claiming that "Mark did
a helluva job against one of the
top wrestlers in the country."
"Johnson's pretty strong," Wyn
noted in the subdued Bronco lock-

er room. "It's tough making the
adjustment from high school wres-
tling to college. I lost some my
freshman year, too."
Rob Huizenga, returhing from a
two-year layoff, pleased the fans
with his unorthodox style, and Bay
with a convincing 6-0 victory. "He's
been working hard and he's going
to improve some more," Bay de-
clared.
DAVE CURBY works out against
heavyweight Gary Ernst in prac-
tice, and had probably his easiest
match of the week, winning a 16-3
superior decision over Bill Cox.
Ernst, in turn, toyed with Terry
Voghtmann for awhile, then pin-
ning the young Bronco at 3:34 with
a 9-0 score already on the board.
"This should be a good confi-
dence builder," Bay analyzed. And
that's fine because today's oppo-
nent, Ohio University, should prove
a lot tougher. The match is sched-
uled for Crisler Arena right after
the basketball festivities.
Broncos busted
118-Jim Brown (M) dec. Paul Amell
(WMU), 16-5
126-Rich Valley (M) dec. Don Daniel
(WMU), 6-0
134-Bill Davids (M) pinned Randy
Cotton (WMU), 3:46
142-Bill Scuck (M) pinned Ed
SHedgecock (WMU), 4:54
150-Jarrett Hubbard (M) pinned
Mark Sands (WMU), 2:44
158-Dan Brink (M) dec. Gary Martin
(WMU), 20-6
167-Doug Wyn (WMU) dec. Mark
Johnson (M), 8-1
177-Rob Huizenga (M) dec. Brian
Van Dusen (WMU). 6-0
190-Dave Curby (M) dec. Bill Cox
(WMU), 16-3
Hwt.-Gary Ernst (M) pinned Terry
Vogtmann (WMU), 3:34.

Luke's four markers
pace Tech's 7-0 win
By BRIAN DEMING But the illness must have been
special To The Daily brief, indeed, as Quance was back
HOUGHTON-From the opening on the ice before the end of the
faceoff, it had the dreary look of period.
last year. Michigan Tech took As for the Tech offense, the name
command early and thoroughly is super. Mike Zuke, a freshman
trounced the Michigan icers 7-0 in sensation last year, scored four
Tech's Student Ice Arena last goals and added two assists, thrill-
night. ing the partisan crowd of 3,425.
Even before the contest began Senior forward Graham Wise
the mood was ominous as someone was also a standout for .he ap-j
tossed a rose on the ice as the parently outstanding Huskies, scor-
Michigan players skated out of the ing two goals.
dressing room. MTU coach John Maclnnes, a
"They played great," remarked Michigan graduate, gave his form-
a disheartened Dan Farrell refer- er assistant a stern lesson as the
ring, of course, to Michigan Tech. Huskies opened the scoring after
The rookie coach, after being an only seventeen seconds had ticked
assistant at Tech since 1958, added, away. Forward George Lyle fed
"They are a helluva hockey team." Zuke from the corner, and the
The Huskie defense has to be sophomore center slapped the puck
admired for their awesome shut- past Moore.
out. Not once in the game could That was the pattern of the
Michigan launch an authentic of- game with all but one Huskie goal
fensive attack. coming on similar centering passes
Led by Jifn Nahrgang and Bob from the corners.
Lorimer,-the Huskies poked and The goal that did not follow that
checked the Michigan offense into form came at 10:51 of the sec-
oblivion, rarely allowing a center- ond period. When Michigan, trying
ing pass. When Michigan finally to begin an offensive attack from
did maneuver a pass, no one was its own end, had the puck slapped
out in front. away by the indomitably Zuke to
"Absolutely tremendous, terrific, Wise. Wise carried the rubber from
superb," were among the adjec- the blue line and tossed it past the
tives Farrell used to describe the only defender, Moore.
MTU defense. The victory was not without its
As for the Tech goalie-a shutout price for the pride of Houghton.
is compliment enough. Rick Quance Lyle, a sophomore forward, suffer-
made only 23 saves, 16 less than ed a twisted knee in the opening
Michigan's Robbie Moore. But a period and was forced to sit out
shutout is a shutout. the game's remainder.
The senior netminder left the Michigan's Gary Morrison re-
game for a short time in the first ceived a stick in the face in the
period, reportedly because of an second period that required nu-
illness, and was replaced tempo- merous stitches, while Don Fardig
rarily by sophomore Jim Warden. played despite a back injury he
incurred before the game.
Angie Moretto, frustrated at his
failure against Tech, admitted
"This is the worst game we have
played. They completely outplayed
us." But the sophomore center re-
l assured, "It's going to be a dif-
ferent story tomorrow.
Randy Neal summed up the loss
Saluki cager is New York Knick by lamenting, "We just got intro-
guard Walt Frazier, who led duced to the WCHA."
Southern Illinois to the National
-~..A. fit. - -' -

SOVIET JEWRY
and ISRAELI SOLIDARITY
PICKET LINES
The following Russian performers are official rep-
resentatives of the Soviet Union under the Cultural
Exchange Program. They are here to demonstrate
to us the culture of their society. We picket to bring
to light the other facets of the Soviet regime-the
cruel denial of freedom to their Jewish citizens. Our
Jewish brethren demand their right to emigrate to
Israel. We must support that demand here in Ann
Arbor. We also deplore Soviet complicity and sup-
port for the current Arab aggression against Israel.
JOIN THIS PEACEFUL DEMONSTRATION
*SAT., Dec. 1-Siberian Dancers
POWER CENTER--8:00 P.M.
PICKET LINE STARTS 7:00 P.M.
PICKET WITH YOUR CHILDREN

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Da ly Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
Schu-ck shackles
RUSSELL PACES HOOPSTERS

Michigan

hosts

SI'

By MARC FELDMAN
A m i d t h e controversy a n d
clamor surrounding the events
on and off the Michigan Stadium
Tartan Turf last weekend, some
Wolverine fans may have over-
looked the cold winter winds
blowing around Ann Arbor and
that the Michigan basketball sea-
son begins today.
Boasting none of the lavish pre-
season praise or impressive sea-
son ticket sales that the past
winter's team had, the younger,
hopefully more enthusiastic Wol-
verines will tip off the 1973-74
campaign at Crisler Arena this
afternoon . against the Southern
Illinois Salukis.
Perhaps as a reaction to last

year's disappointments, the '73-
'74 Wolverines have received
little acclaim or even attention
from the local press. In fact,
Michigan's best player, 6-7 for-
ward Campy Russell, is probably
more respected in other parts of
the country than he is in Ann
Arbor.
Paul Lambert, coach of todav's
o p p o n e n t, says of Russell,
"Campy is one of the outstand-
ing players we will see all year.
In fact, he is one of the best
college basketball players in the
country."
Russell is at his best when he
is the center of the action and
there is nothing this year to
stop him from assuming the
domineering role that he enjoyed
all through school until last sea-
son. Campy is unquestionably the
best player on this team and he
will be treated as such by his
teammates.
C. J. Kupec has had the start-
ing centeer job nailed down since
the start of practice. Kup-c is
tough on the boards but his 6-8
height and lack of great jumping
ability may hurt him.
The real test of whether Mich-
igan will be competitive may be
HOST RELAYS:

s' Is
NIGHT EDITOR:
ROGER ROSSITER
told on the boards this season.
With all that height and experi-
ence last year, the Wolverines
still ranked an unimpressive
seventh in Conference rebound-
ing. Next to Russell, the real bur-
den of board crashing will be on
Kupec's shoulders.
The Salukis, 11-15 last year,
will probably not provide a true
test on the boards today although
they possess a fine center in 6-11
Joe Meriweather.
SIU relies on Meriweather for
scoring punch but he has yet to
prove himself as a rebounder.
The Saluki center scored at a 17
point clip last year but his paltry
eight rebounds per game leave
him suspect.
Undoubtedly, the most famous

Invitational Tournament cham-
pionship in 1966. Like "Clyde,"
freshman guard Mike Glenn, hails
from the state of Georgia, and
was described by Lapbert as
"better than Walt was as a
freshman."
Opposite Abrams at forward is
junior college transfer Perry
Hines. Hines, 6-2, was the second
leading J.C. scorer in the country
last year at Lakeland. Rounding
out the starting lineup at guard
is holdover Dennis Shidleer, who
averaged eight points a game last
Iseason.
Junior Wolverine Bill Ayler,
who earned the last minute start-
ing assignment at "the other
forward" late this week, will
guard Hines and hopefully pro-
vide some board strength.
Joe Johnson, a seven point
scorer last year, earned back the
starting job he owned most of
last year with improved play and
hopefully some added confidence
in fall drills. Steve Grote, the
talented freshman, will man the
second back court slot.

Tech-nically thrashed
1r2 3 F
Michigan 0 0 0--0
Michigan Tech 1 2 4-7
FIRST PERIOD
SCORING: 1. Tech - Zuke (Lyle) :17.
SECOND PERIOD
SCORING: 2. Tech - Stamler (Zuke,
1Steele) 5:08; 3. Tech -,,Wise (Zuke)
10:51.
THIRD PERIOD
SCORING: 4. Tech-Zuke (Lorimer)
:51; 5. Tech - Zuke (Stamler, Abbey)
5:07; 6. Tech-Wise (D'Alvise, Mayer)
6:54; 7. Tech - Zuke (Steele) 18:10.
GOALIE SAVES: 1 2 3 Tot.
Moore (M) 21 9 13-43
Quance (T) 7 8 8-23
Warden (T) 1 - ---1
ISCOtESj
NBA
Cleveland 112, Philadelphia 110
Capital 121, Buffalo 113
Chicago 115, New York 97
Milwaukee 117, Boston 93
Houston 110, Detroit 95
W CHA
Wisconsin 6, MSU 6, tie
Denver 6, Notre Dame 4

Subscribe to

The D.Ily

Phone 764-0558

, I

SSports of The Daily
By JOHN KAHLER
Bo doesn't show
The Big Ten football coaches held a meeting yesterday in
Chicago. Nine coaches met with Big Ten commissioner Wayne
Duke to exchange pleasantries and compliment W. W. (Woody)
Hayes on his trip to the Rose Bowl. One coach chose not to
attend - Bo Schembechler. He spent the day in his office on
State Street, holding a recruiting meeting with his assistants.
Coach Schembechler could not be reached for comment on his
decision to stay home, but in recent days he has made his
opinions concerning his Big Ten brethren and Commissioner
Duke well known.
Commented Duke, "I am making no comment whatever on
the absence of Schembechler from the coaches' meeting, and
also will say nothing further about his accusations except what
I said when they were made - that they are ridiculous and
absurd." Duke also said the matter will be reported to the
conference faculty representatives and athletic directors when
they meet Monday.
Campy, C.J. captains
This year's Michigan basketball co-captains are Campy Rus-
sell and C. J. Kupec, who were elected Thursday night by
a near-unanimous vote of their teammates. Their election con-
stitutes a minor break with tradition, since both are juniors.
But, with only one senior on the squad, the two best (and most
deserving) people were chosen.
V.R.'s tip off season
The Michigan Varsity Reserve basketball team begins a new
season with a 11:45 tipoff against Lansing Community College.
Because of scouting cofnmittments, regular V.R. coach Bill
Frieder will be absent and Richard "Bird" Carter will handle
the team.
Carter, who coached last year's non-scholarship freshman
team, should feel right at home with this squad. No scholarship
players have been dropped to the V.R.'s for this game, though
there will be some on the roster for other games.
Footballer Rick White (6-5) will start at one forward for
the Baby Blue. Ann Arbor Pioneer's Kent Storey (6-3) will
man the other frontcourt position. Daryl Carter (6-6) occupies
the pivot. The backcourt will be manned by three people; How-
a Comstnr c k- esrowne .ndBill Burres anhnmore.

w hy does a man
join Maryknoll?

I

A

4

i ! I

Tankers open season

This Weekend in Sports
TODAY
BASKETBALL-Southern Illinois; Crisler Arena, 2 p.m.
BASKETBALL-VARSITY RESERVE, Lansing CC; Crisler Arena,
11:30 a.m.-
SWIMMING-Big Ten Relays; Matt Mann Pool, 2 p.m.
WRESTLING-Ohio U.; Crisler Arena, 4 p.m.
HOCKEY-at Michigan Tech
GYMNASTICS-at Chicago, Windy City Meet

There are probably as many answers
as there are individual Maryknoll
priests and Brothers. Some men are
deeply moved when they hear of
babies dying in their mother's arms
because of hunger or disease. Others
are distressed by the growing antag-
onism and separation between the
rich and the poor nations. More are
concerned about the great injustices
that have been inflicted upon the
poor by those who possess wealth

and power to an excessive degree.
Others look to learn from peoples
who have grown up with a different
mentality than that which is theirs.
All feel that the only solution to the
crises that threaten to split men
asunder is the love of God as shown
in the life of His Son, Jesas Christ.
This love of God urges men to go
forward and be missioners so men
can love one another. What could be
your reason for joining Maryknoll?

By LESLIE RIESTER
Michigan hosts the Big Ten Re-'
lays today at Matt Mann Pool, and
if Indiana forgot to come, the Wol-
verines would have a field day.
Unfortunately, the Hoosiers will
be here along with MSU and OSU
to race Michigan in the Big Ten's
East Division Swimming and Div-
ing Relays. The diving starts at.
11 a.m.; the races at 2 p.m.
Wolverine coach Gus Stager ad-i
mits Indiana is favored to win the4
Relays, but says MSU and OSU
won't come close to Michigan. Pur-
due, fifth member of the E a s t'
Division, won't even be here.
Despite Indiana's expected dom-
inance of the meet, Stager claims
the Wolverines will give the Hoos-
iers a good battle in several events
including the breaststroke relay,
the individual medley, the 400-yard
medley. and the 400 and 800-yard
freestyle relays.
Stressing that today's meet is
like a season warm-up, Stager said
he may not start his strongest re-
lay teams in order to make an ac-
curate assessment of his squad's
abilities.
"We will probably have a better
team than last year," claims Sta-
ger, "despite losing 45 per cent of
the squad through graduation."

To replace such standouts as
freestyler Ray McCulloug h andI
backstroker Steve McCarthy, Mich-
igan recruited five promiisng fresh- _
men, and there are the men Stag-
er will be watching today.
Stager will get his first look at
his freshmen when Robbie Bow-!
man swims the individual medley;
Fred Yawger swims the butterfly in
the 400-yard medley; Gordon
Downie anchors the 400-yard free-
style; and Norm Semchyschen fol-
lows Downie in the 800-yard free-
style.
Freshman backstroker Robbie
Helt, Yawger's high school team-
mate, will probably see action.
Those five frosh will join such
established stars as Stuart Isaac,
Tom Szuba, Jose Aranha and Pat
Bauer, as well as the rest of Mich-
igan's talented team.

ITS D0lpcurTo66sfi i
IN C1E6MomiC - r .
TRY US THIS
SUNDAY.
WE'LL MAKE IT
WORTH YOUR
WAKING UP.
Coffee at 10:00 a.m.
10:15-"On Confessing
Your Faith"
6:00 p.m.-"Pondering"
Holy Communion
THE REV.
DON POSTEMA
1236 WASHTENAW
COURT

ACAPULCO
', Dec. 21-28
$289
Complete
Students, Faculty, & Staff contact
Vagabond 7( "75
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If you keep saying you want to do something
with your life - here's your chance to prove it
For information, write or phone to: MD
MARYKNOLL MISSIONERS, 610 LONGFELLOW AVE.
DETROIT, Mi.48202 (313) 865-0990
Dear Father:
Please send me information about becoming a
Maryknoll Priest D Brother Ql Sister Q
Name
Address__
:. City State Zip
1 do want to S
do something. Age_. Phone__
--------------------------------------------------

1974 CALENDARS
and NEW BOOKS
25% off
AT
David's Books
209 S. State St.
663-8441

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(- -
BLUE GRASS FANSI
see the COUNTRY GENTLEMAN Dec. 2nd,
LARRY SPARKS Dec. 12th, and the
GOINS BROTHERS Dec. 16th

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