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November 28, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-11-28

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Wednesday, November 28, 197

THE MICHIGAN DAI

Pacge Three~

Wednesday, November 28, 1 97~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sirica gets buzz off
first Watergate tape
played in courthouse

UNIVERSITY DANCERS
AT
POWER CENTER
THURS., NOV. 29-8 P.M.
FRI., NOV. 30-4 P.M. & 8 P.M.
WORKS BY: GAY DELANGHE
VERA EMBREE
LUCAS HOVING

APPhoto
Rose Mary Woods, President Nixon's personal secretary, entered U. S. District Court yesterday for
another day of testimony. She is shown flanked by her personal attorneys.
Consumer gas may be cut 30%
pump taxes or rationing possible

WASHINGTON (P)-One of the
famed White House tapes was
played in public for the first time
yesterday but the only question
it settled is that there is indeed
a hum.
It lasted, as the White House
said. 18 minutes and 15 seconds.
TO STRAINING ears in U.S.
District Judge J o h n Sirica's
crowded courtroom, it sounded
like electric clippers in a barber
shop. Here and there, before and
after them hum, the voices of
President Nixon and aides John
Ehrlichman and H. R. Haldeman
could be heard in snatches of
conversation.
There was some whistling-tune
and whistler unidentified. Then
the long buzz, loud at first, then
a little lower and then loud
again.
The tape, of a meeting in
Nixon's Executive Office Build-
ing suite on June 20, 1972-in-
volving first Ehrlichman and
then Haldeman-was played as
the President's secretary, Rose
Mary Woods, was on the stand.
IT WAS THE 10th day of a
hearing that began as an inquiry
into two subpoenaed Watergate
tapes the White House said were
nonexistent. It changed in char-
acter after the White House dis-
closure last week that the Halde-
man conversation was missing
the 18-minute segment.
Special Watergate prosecution
force lawyers say that the part
obilterated w a s conversation
about the Watergate break-in
that occurred only three days be-
fore the conversation was re-
corded.
In other developments, the
Richmond office of the Small
B u s i n e s s Administration was
pressured by the White House to
approve loans and credit guar-
antees for Bennie McRae, a for-
mer professional football player
who had campaigned for Presi-
dent Nixon, a House subcommi-
ttee was told yesterday.
CURTIS PRINS, chief investi-
gator for the House Banking
Committee, gave that testimony
at the opening of public hearings
into alleged SBA corruption.He
said the Richmond office also
approved loans to realtives of
employes there.
Prins also said, in answer to
questions, that he had evidence

that the White House pressured
the SBA in other cases to facili-
tate loans or to cover up investi-
gations of irregular loans.
Prins declined to give many
details, saying that "we have
developed one case up to 75 per
cent and one other case we only
received yesterday afternoon."
HE SAID there is evidence of
at least one case where SBA
financing was arranged for com-
panies in which White House
staffers were participating.
Special Watergate prosecutor
Leon Jaworski said yesterday he
is vigorously investigating the
ITT affair.
Allegations against officers or
directors of ITT, the Interna-
tional Telephone & Telegraph
Corp., will be investigated joint-
ly with acting Atty. Gen. Robert
Bork, Jaworski said.
JAWORSKI MADE the state-
ment in a letter to Rep. J. J.
Pickle (D-Tex.), the second-rank-
ing majority member of a House
subcommittee that held exten-
sive hearings into the ITT affair.
Pickle said, in a letter to Ja-
worski Nov. 16, that the spelal
prosecutor's ITT investigation
appeared to be dormant.
Jaworski r e p 1 i e d yesterday
"that his office is vigorously pur-
suing the investigation into what
has been commonly referred to
as the 'ITT matter.' "
FINALLY, THE Senate Water-
gate committee acknowledged
yesterday that its investigations
of the milk fund and the Hughes-
Rebozo money weren't going well
and postponed further hearings
at least until January.
Chairman Sam Ervin Jr. (J-
N.C.) and vice chairman Howard
Baker, Jr. (R-Tenn.) attributed
the delay to witnesses who have
failed to appear under commit-
tee subpoena, White House re-
fusal to turn over some docu-
ments and an admission by the
staffthat it simply wasn'tbready
to proceed.

TICKETS ON SALE AT:
$2.00 and $3.50
FOR INFO CALL 763-3333

POWER CENTER 12-4 P.M.
MUSIC SHOP-717 N. UNIVERSITY
sponsored by Dept. of P.E.

r-

i

i
i
i
I
r

The Firesign Theatre
Featuring
PROCTOR and BEGMAN
Sat., Dec. 1, 1973
PEASE AUDITORIUM.
2 SHOWS

7:30 P.M.

& 9:30 P.M.

WASHINGTON OP) -The gov-
ernment tapped civilian and do-
mestic supplies yesterday to
assure adequate fuel for the De-
fense Department, and sources
said consumer gasoline supplies
may soon be reduced by up to
30 per cent.
The cutback would be twice
that announced by President
Nixon Sunday night.
PRESIDENT Nixo's Emergen-
cy Energy Action Group, which
met yesterday, was reportedly
considering rationing gasoline,
imposing a supplemental tax of
30 to 40 cents, or both.
Meanwhile, Arab foreign min-
isters approved a Saudi Arabia
proposal that oil restrictions
against Japan and all European
Common Market countries ex-
cept the- Netherlands be lifted,
reliable sources reported in Al-
giers yesterday..
The sources said the foreign
ministers approved the proposal
at a meeting in Algiers before a
summit conference of Arab lead-
ers convened on Moinday.

THE SUMMIT conference is
to act on the ministers' resolu-
tions.
The proposal by Saudi Arabia,
the Mideast's largest oil pro-
ducer, apparently did not include
any change in the Arab embargo
of oil for the United States. The
Netherlands also is under a total
embargo.
The Saudi proposal seeks to
reward Europe and Japan for
recent declarations indicating a
shift in policy more favorable to
the Arabs, the sources said.
THE NETHERLANDS was not
included in the proposed shift
because the Arabs consider the
Dutch government to be commit-
ted to Israel, the sources said.
The summit conference in Al-
giers sought to reconcile rival
Jordanian and guerrilla claims
to the allegiance of the Pales-
tinian people-an explosive issue
the leaders feel must be resolved
before any peace conference with
Israel.
In other energy-related de-
velopments:
The White House issued fi-

nal regulations prohibiting elec-
tric power plants that burn coal
from switching to oil. The rules
permit plants burning natural
gas, a scarce fuel, to switch to
oil.
0 The Office of Petroleum Al-
location ordered priorities on the
sale of fuel for marine use, giv-
ing preference to boats and land
facilities involved in harvesting
and processing fish and other
seafood. Pleasure vessels may
buy marine fuels only if ade-
quate supplies are on hand after
seafood processors have bought
their supplies.
* House Commerce Commit-
tee Chairman Harley Staggers
(D-W.Va.) said he hopes to fin-
ish work on emergency energy
legislation by the end of the
week. His bill would give the
President broad power to restrict
energy use.

GENERAL ADMISSION IS $2.50
Tickets can be purchased at: McKenny Union Ticket Booth, Huckleberry
Party Store, Ann Arbor Music Mart, and J.L. Hudson's.

L

LI _ _ _ _ _ _

J

III (_ __. --_ 1

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.E ~ m~G7N '::i4R +W rr..:wrs f ,";"}:Sr,"K:":i;: ."'{ s isY,;:;:}r'fiv3:ri I jr>l5i e,}:S":iir;{:;r"'S?

Il

PRESENTS
A SHAW FESTIVAL PRODUCTION
RICHARD MURDOCK,
PAXTON WHITEHEAD
IN
YOU NEVER
C NTELL
by BERNARD SHAW
with PATRICIA GAGE,
JAMES VALENTINE, SHELIA HANEY
directed by EDWARD GILBERT
". the effervescent Show Festival Company . .
-DETROIT FREE PRESS
"An enormously winning, refreshingly civilized delight."
-DETROIT NEWS
DECEMBER 6-9
8 P.M. (Sat. & Sun. Matinees 3 P.M.)
Ticket Information available at PTP Ticket Office
764-0450 Presented in MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
MAJOR EVENTS COMMITTEE
PRESENT
GENESIS
Pease Auditorium

4'
'/

Wednesday, November 28
DAY CALENDAR
Ctr. Russian & E. European Studies:
R. Vidmer, "Administrative Sciences in
the USSR: the Emergence of a Dis-
cipline," 206 Lane Hall, noon.
Computing Ctr.: T. Boardman, "In-
teractive Graphics Communication Sys-
tem," 120 P-A Bldg., noon.
U-M Alumnae: 7th Annual Holiday
Bazaar, N. Campus Commons, 1-8 pm.
Commission for Women: M1112 SPH
II, 109 S. Observatory, noon.
Ethics, Religion Office: M. Heirich,
1025 Angell Hall, 3 pm.
Psychology: R. Shepard, Stanford
Univ., "On Turning Something Over in
the Mind," Rackham Amph., 3:15 pm.
Statistics: L. Kish, "Inference from
Complex Samples," 3227 Angell Hall, 4
pm.
Physics: L. Rosen, Los Alamos Sci.
Lab., "The Clinton P. Anderson Meson
Physics Facility P-A Bldg. Colloq. Rm.,
4 pm.
Botany, Zoology: R. Trivers, Harvard

Grand Dukd'" Mendelssohn, 8 pm.
Baratin: French House, 613 Oxford
Rd.. 8 pm. I
Musical Society : N. Yepes, guitarist,
Rackham Aud., 8:30 pm.
GENERAL NOTICES'
December 1973 Teacher's Certificate
Candidates: All requirements for teach-
er's certificate must be completed by
Dec. 5; teacher's oath should be taken
as soon as possible in 1225 Sch. of
Educ.; Placement Office material can
be obtained in 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB, 763-4117
Detailed information regarding sum-
mer employment for guides at Green-
field village/Henry Ford Museum has
arrived; deadline for interviewing, Jan.
18.
Inst. of Urban Studies of Cleveland
State Univ. announces Summer Intern
Prog. for JUNIORS. Must have interest
in Pub. Admin. Any major field of
study acceptable. Further details avail-
able and applications. Deadline Feb. 15.

A Joseph1E.Lvine anld Brut Productions
pre"ca""m
George Glenda
Segal 'Jackson
A Melvin Frank F1
iuch
Of Class
7:00 & 9:00P.M

Sat., Dec. 8-9 P.M.
TICKETS: $3.50 in advance

!$ , f
II!

rp

-mill

I

VAILAB
nn Arbo

$4.00 at the door
LE AT: McKenny Union Ticket Booth,
r Music Mart, J.L. Hudson's, Grinnell's

i

Univ.. "Natural Selection of the k .
at BirhinMammals," Lec Rm.-' ,
1, MLB, 4:10 pm.
Ctr. Coord. of Ancient, Modern Stu-
dies: H. Levin, Harvard Univ., "From J
Obsession to Imagination," Aud. A, An-
gell Hall, 4:10 pm. raduation
Gilbert & Sullivan Society "The
THE MICHIGAN rAILY 8
brolume LXXXIv, Number 68An ocent
' Wednesday, November 28, 1913 O
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at GRADUATING
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morningGR UN
during the University year at 420 May- {
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
pusarea); $11 local mail (Michigan and
and foreign). ARE N QT..VNOWSALE
Summer session publishea Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campusInformation Desk Main Lobby L.S.A. Bldg
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail ,other i
states and foreign)..o
THEARTOFSALT DISNEY
i A magnificently illustrated testament of joy to the imagination and art
of a man who enchanted and delighted two generations
The world of Walt Disney came -perhaps the most spectacular togrophs illustrating how film-
into being in 1928 with a cartoon pleasure grounds the world has making skills were adapted to aid ° 0
short called STEAMBOAT WILLIE. ever seen. in the design of the parks.
Itsstar, Mickey Mouse, was soon This lavish volume is the first book Christopher Finch's the xt details
followed by Donald Duck, Pluto, worthy of the unique talent and Disney's career and the history of x ;. . 4
and endless others. Later features imagination of Walt Disney. All the Disney Studios while providing
such as MARY POPPINS and the elements that go into the a critical commentary on his ma- ~
FANTASIA were stunningly suc- making of an animated film are jar films and other enterprises. ":,:, .;''
cessful in the introduction of new documented and explained, hun- Peter Blakediscusses Disneyland
. animation techniques. By far the dreds of previously unpublished and Walt Disney World, not ne- 763 illustrations, 351 in

Handel's Lss~aI
THIS WEEKEND: Friday, Saturday, and Sunday

The perfect way to begin the holiday season-plan now to attend
one of the three performances of this traditional holiday favorite
which has been presented by the University Choral Union for over
ninety years. Donald Bryant conducts the 350-voice chorus and the
Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra. This year's outstanding soloists
are Ruth Falcon, soprano; Muriel Greenspon, contralto, John Sandor,
tenor, and Saverio Barbieri, bass.

ca AT TCTI' A T I T.n 7/7V

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