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November 27, 1973 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1973-11-27

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Tuesday, November 27, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Tuesday, November 27, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

:

ose

blossoms

F

- ..Seed4L C& . .Sirn
'The Big T'en will live . . .
. to regret this decision'
Dan Borus
THE McDONALD'S of Ann Arbor, who offered to do so, doesn't
have to send Woody Hayes to the Rose Bowl this year. The
Big Ten Athletic Directors, in a capricious and vapid decision,
relieved the burger chain of the responsibility.

....

In their Sunday telephone
whom saw the clash, decided
.of the conference regulation,
to send to that prestigious bowl.

vote, the, directors, only three of
that Ohio State is, in the words
"the most representative team"

Well, the directors' august and mighty opinion reeks.
A gutty band of Wolverines streamed out of the tunnel
to start the second half and took it to the number one team
in the country and took it to them good. Trailing 10-0, the
Wolverines never called it quits and proved to those who
had given up hope that they are as good a football team as
there is in the land.
But the Athletic Directors didn't see that comeback. They
didn't see the team effort. They didn't see the Buckeyes walk
off knowing that, though the scoreboard didn't say so, they were
beaten. They didn't hear the deafening silence in the Buck locker
room after the tilt.
No, those six who voted nay to Michigan's bid to go West,
didn't know that the awesome Buckeyes didn't get a first down
in the first quarter. No, those old coots didn't know that Larry
Cipa has never lost a game in a Maize and Blue uniform. No,
they can't measure the dedication the Wolverines put into this
game.
All these ADs know is Dennis Franklin broke his collar
bone. They do not know how badly it is broken or how quickly
it will heal. Dr. Gerry O'Conner, the team physician, does
not yet know and not one Athletic Director took the trouble to
phone him.
Admittedly, Denny is the best quarterback in the league.
He must be the best player as well-if his suspected absence
would cause the best team in the league not to go West. But
there are forty other Wolverines who put out supreme
efforts last Saturday and are being punished because a
bunch of old men don't want to see their conference go down
to a fifth straight defeat in the New Year's showdown.
So, what are they doing? They're sending a team, which
admittedly can not pass, against a team which destroyed the
UCLA running game.
Consider this. Lantry hits one of those field goals-he didn't
miss them by much-but Franklin is still hurt. Michigan goes
West and there's no question, no fuss. That's the same team
that outplayed Ohio Staturday and will sit out this New Year's
wondering who had a grudge against them.
The team that would be going West under those circum-
stances (without Franklin) still would have the best fullback
in the Big Ten, the best safety in the nation, the best defensive
tackle, and the most under-rated linebackers. The team that's
staying home has heart and character and an offensive line
that moved "the best defense" in the country around as con-
vincingly as an offensive line can move a defense around.
But the athletic directors wouldn't know about that.
They weren't watching-as if that would have made any dif-
ference.-
As Schembechler pointed out yesterday, "Ignorance
played a part in the vote."
The six-five, excepting Ohio State's Ed Weaver-have set
a dangerous precedent. If injury to the opposition's key player
can change the result of the vote, then there will be a lot of
headhunting in the Big Ten next year and for many years to
come. The five will have to answer for thoseinjuries.
All the rationalizations, all the excuses about "over-all
record" and "consistency" and "most representative team"
ignore the ,real issue here-whether the Rose Bowl bid is a
reward or a public relations gimmick.
The Five, more concerned with image than with people,
have answered loud and clear: "GIMMICK!" In doing so,
they dissolved any semblance of principle in the league
and have disillusioned those who naively assume some may
exist.
If you don't want to watch the Rose Bowl, you can
always read Woody's next book, "You Win with Athletic
Directors."
Yesterday Schembechler, his voice choking, distraught
with the raw deal his thirty seniors have been dealt, vowed to
a cheering Quarterback Club luncheon, "The Big Ten will live to
regret this decision!"
He further asked Commissioner Wayne Duke (who, through
his report of the injury and not of the game, may have in-
fluenced the vote) and the Five to come before his team and
say to Dennis Franklin-"You're not healthy enough to play
in the Rose Bowl" and to Larry Cipa-"You can't quarterback
a Big Ten team against Southern California in the Rose Bowl."
They won't, of course. They don't call them the Little Five
for nothing.

By BOB HEUER
It was a win, then a tie,
then a loss.
As Larry Gustafson knelt
at the 34-yard line waiting
for Mike Lantry's strong
left foot to finish off Ohio
State's desperate Buckeyes,
victory seemed imminent.
But as Lantry's field goal
attempt went a few feet
wide to the right, an anti-
climactic, immensely satis-
fying, yet agonizingly frus-
trating 10-10 verdict flick-
ered i n t h e scoreboard
lights.
Then came the shocker.
Disregarding the edict of all
who witnessed Saturday's titanic
struggle, the Big Ten athletic di-
rectors voted to send Ohio State,
not Michigan to the Rose Bowl on
INew Year's Day.
Sunday's decision came as a
cold slap in the face to the Wol-
verines, not to mention the howl-
ing Michigan partisans (an NC-
AA record 105,233) who watched
their team come from the brink
of disaster to within inches of a
win over the nation's number
one ranked football team.
But how six prestige-minded
politicos voted Sunday in no way
diminishes the fact that one hell-
uva football game unfolded be-
neath the threatening skies over
Michigan Stadium on November
24, 1973.
Neither will it diminish the
fact that Michigan dominated
the top-rated Buckeyes in three
of the game's four quarters, or
that Ohio State gained not a sin-
gle first down in the opening
quarter and not a single yard in
the final six minutes.
Despite all that, things looked
dark indeed for the Maize and
Blue at halftime. Behind the in-
comparable running of tailback
Archie Griffin, the Buckeyes
powered their way to a 10-0 lock-
erroom lead. Griffin set up Blair
Conway's 31-yard field goal with
a 38-yard sprint, then single-
handedly pounded the Wolverine
defense into near oblivion, gain-
ing 41 of Ohio's 55 yards in its
disheartening touchdown drive.
But the aroused Wolverines
stormed back. Led by the pun-
ishing running of fullback Ed

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITORS:
CHUCK BLOOM
JOHN KAHLER
Shuttlesworth, and the superb
play of the offensive line, they
drove from the Michigan 33 to
the Ohio State 12 as the third
quarter waned. But the Bucks
stiffened and a 30-yard Lantry
field goal had to suffice.
The Michigan defense held
Ohio in check on the next series
and OhiohState's punt gave the
Wolverines possession on their
own 49. From there it took only
seven plays to knot it up. Dennis
Franklin passed to tight end Paul
Seal, who high-stepped his way
down to theh19-yard line. Then on
fourth and inches from the Ohio
10, Franklin faked the dive to
Shuttlesworth, slipped inside
right end and danced untouched
into the endzone.
Lantry added the point after
and the stage was set for a pres-
sure packed, heart rending, nail-
biting, agonizing finish. Ohio
State took the kickoff and drove
to the Michigan 44 before having
to punt. Dave Brown called for a
fair catch at the 12-yard line and
the last six minutes belonged
solely to Michigan.
Mixing his plays beautifully,
Franklin engineered a drive that

fade
had the Wolverines headed for
victory before disaster struck.
Under heavy pressure, Franklin
fired a short pass to Shuttles-
worth for a first down at the
Ohio State 48. But in the process,
the cool Michigan signal caller
was hammered to the turf by end
Van DeCree, suffering a broken
collarbone - the injury that pro-
bably kept his team out of the
Rose Bowl.
Larry Cipa replaced Franklin,
but the drive stalled, necessitat-
ing a 58-yard field goal try that
sailed less than a foot to the left
of the uprights.
With 1:01 remaining, Woody
Hayes gambled for victory; opt-
ing to fill the air with footballs.
He went with supposedly pass or-
iented Greg Hare at quarterback.
But Michigan cornerback Tom
Drake picked off Hare's first
off-balance toss to give Michi-
gan a second chance at the Buck-
eye 33.
However an unfortunate time-
out call and a hurried pass out
of bounds left the Wolverines at
the 27-yard line with 28 seconds
and no timeouts remaining. Bo
Schembechler elected to go for
the field goal on third down and
it missed.
Of course everything that hap-
pened on the field became sec-
ondary when the decision to send
Ohio State to Pasadena was an-
nounced. But one Woody Hayes
post-game statement casts doubt
on that decision. As to why he
had gambled with desperation
passes in the final minute, Woody
said: "We knew we had to win
this one to go."

Say it ain't so, Bo!

Ohio St. Mich.

RUSHING
OHIO STATE

First Downs
Rushes-yards
Passing yards
Passes
Punts-avg.
Fumbles-lost
Penalties-yards
MICHIGAN
Ohio State

9
49-234
0
0-4-1
7-31.4
0-0
0-0

16
56-204
99
7-12-1
,5-39.8
1-1
4-37

WINGBACK CLINT HASLE-
RIG (43) goes high in the air
to make a fine grab of a Dennis
Franklin pass in Saturday's 10-
10 tie. Despite the effort of
such Buckeyes as Randy Grad-
ishar (53) and Steve Luke (46)
Haslerig split the Ohio State
zone for five receptions total-
ing 64 yards.

Griffin
Greene
Johnson
Elia
Lippert
Franklin
Shuttlesworth
Chapman
Heater
Haslerig

MICHIGAN

0 0 0 10-10
0 10 0 0-0

att
30
9
5
4
2
4
27
19
5
1
no.
5
1
1

yds. avg.
163 5.4
34 4.0
22 4.4
13 3.3
4 2.0
17 4.3
116 4.2
58 3.1
12 2.4
1 1.0
yds. long
64 14
27 27
a a

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
,.- 66.2-ST6
tcOn t 1 -e ,6
I/a

Ohio-Conway, 31-yard FG
Ohio-Johnson, 5-yard run (Conway
kick)
M-Lantry, 30-yard FG
M-Franklin, 10 yard run (Lantry kick)
Att-105,223

RECEIVING
MICHIGAN

Haslerig
Seal
Shuttlesworth

'SAVE BEST FOR LAST'

Seniors
By CHUCK BLOOM .
After last Saturday's tie, the
Ohio State locker room seemed
like a morgue. The Buckeye
players sat down with their heads
bowed in silence-as if they had
lost.
On the other side of the tunnel
that leads out of Michigan Sta-
dium, the Wolverines were sing-
ing "The Victors" at the top of
their lungs-something they do
only when victorious.
Leading those cheers were the
seniors-the men Bo Schembech-
ler has called "the backbone of
the team"-who had just com-
pleted their varsity careers be-
fore the home folks.
"We saved our best for last,
didn't we?" exclaimed guard
Mike Hoban. "We really did the
job on them today."
Indeed, they had saved the
best for last. Down 10-0 at the
half, the Wolverines came storm-
ing back to outgain, outmuscle,
and out-play the "mighty" Buck-
eyes from down yonder.
Spearheading the senior surge
was fullback Ed Shuttlesworth.
Hampered by injuries in the past
two Ohio State games, the Cin-
cinnati Crusher showed the Bucks
just how formidable he is when
he's physically 100 per cent.

lead comeback

"Gentlemen, that was a great
fullback in there today," Schem-
bechler commented in his post-
game interview. "That was his
finest performance as a Wolver-
ine-without a doubt."
Orange Man
The obvious became official
yesterday as Michigan assistant.
football coach Frank Maloney
signed a four-year pact as head
coach of Syracuse.
Shuttlesworth gave all the cred-
it to his offensive line, a unit
which included four seniors: Ho-
ban, Paul Seal, Curtis Tucker,
and Jim Coode. "It was all block-
ing," he said of his 116 yards
gained. "I can't say enough for
them. They (Ohio) knew they'd
been in a game."
Everyone contributed to the
Michigan comeback-even when
the contribution was one single
play. For e x a m p 1 e, tailback
Larry Gustafson showed moxie
under pressure by flagging down
a poor center snap and spotting
it perfectly for Mike Lantry's
successful 30-yard field goal that
put the Wolverines back in the
game.
"When I first saw the snap,"
explained Gustafson, "I thought
of running the ball for the first
down. But for some reason I just
spotted it. Damn lucky thing I
did, too."
All-American Dave Gallagher
received ABC's accolade as out-
standing defensive player but
other seniors like Doug Troszak
played equally as well.
"All this talk about how I was
going to get eaten by (John)
Hicks was bull," Troszak exulted.
"I didn't have that much trouble
with him. Of course, our defense

wasn't out there that much in
the second half. So that helped."
Who can forget wingback Clint
Haslerigand those perfect pass
patterns he ran? Certainly not
the Ohio secondary.
"Haslerig ran some beautiful
cuts," beamed Schembechler.
"He played some good football
out there."
But Haslerig considered it ele-
mentary. "All I had to do was
read their zone every play. They
were the ones who were confused
all the time because I played
four differentbpositions. When
they thought I was split out as a
flanker, I'd be the slotback and
they couldn't a d j u s t quick
enough. I even played a little
tight end. Man, I've been doing
this all year except nobody's
noticed."
WhendSchembechler first ap-
proached the press after the
game, he talked about his team's
great character and heart. Last
Saturday the seniors were the
"heart" of the Michigan Wol-
verines.

EmruMei
may Mt RIN
ivrni billn

For the session starting Fall, 1974,
Euromed will assist qualified Amer-
ican students in gaining admission
to recognized overseas medical
schools.
And that's just the beginning.
Since the language barrier constitutes
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In addition, Euromed provides stu-
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American students now studying medi-
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as counselors.
Senior or graduate students currently
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program.
For application and further
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(800) 645-1234
or write.
Euro mdot, LW.d
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