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November 21, 1973 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-11-21

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Wednesday, November 21, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Po e

Wednesday, November 21, 1973THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ie Fi,

Amazo':

Weirdness
5 airwaves

onW
By SUE DISE
Look! Up in the airwaves; Is it a
bird? A plane? Alice Cooper?
No, it's "Amazo Theatre!"
What is this new radio weird-
ness? "It's Amazo Theatre,' that's
it!" says Dan Carlisle, WABX-FM
broadcaster. That is as apt a defi-
nition as any, since "Amazo Thea-
tre" promises to be anything and.
everything.
The monthly hour-long show is
the Detroit station's latest attempt
to breath new life into contempor-
ary radio programming. The first
show, broadcast in October, fea-
tured such items as an interview

IB'l

with a producer of horror films, a
"meeting" with a creature from
outer space and bits of European
radio programs.
Carlisle, producer of "Amazo
Theatre," describes it as "No for-
mat." He explained that the show
presents an opportunity for the
WABX staff and listeners to do
whatever they want in an unpro-
grammed radio spot.
"Amazo" was conceived as a
supplement to the station's pro-
gressive rock music-oriented for-
mat. "I get tired of playing re-
cords, and I think people get tired
of listening," said Carlisle.

Ars Musica brings
back Baroque Era

The show appears to be a new
direction in current radio program-
ming, but Carlisle thinks that the
idea is an old approach.
Although radio has become more
music-oriented since the growth of
television, he doesn't believe the
visual medium has destroyed the
concept of the radio "show." "I
don't think T.V. has the artistic
impact of radio," he commented.
"T.V. is after the fact."
"Amazo Theatre is not the first
non-music program WABX has pre-
sented. Three years ago, the staff
produced a radio version of "Dra-
cula."
The station experimented with
a simulcast radio and television
program, "Tubeworks.";They have
also broadcast the "Dear Friends"
show by avant-garde comedy
group, the Firesign Theatre, and
their own "Rock 'n' Roll News."
However, "Amazo" is the first
program the station offered up to
listener participation. Carlisle is
looking forward to outside ideas.
He asks that people send their
suggestions to him, care of WABX,
along with their phone numbers so
he can contact them. "There is
no quality control," he stated.
'We'll present them as they are."
Everyone at WABX is enthusias-
tic about the project. Participation
in completely voluntary, but even
the station manager has helped
with the taping.
The staff currently plans to do
a show about the Ringling Broth-
ers circus and hopes to present an
H. P< Lovecraft story in the future.
Does WABX think they could be
starting a trend in radio program-
ming with "Amazo Theatre?"
Maybe, according to Carlisle.
"Everyone has copped from us be-!
fore . . . maybe they'll cop this and
radio will be interesting again."

ALL=:
YOU CAN C
EAT
Mounds of Spaghetti, .Colesw, Garlic Bread
EVERY WEDNESDAY 4:30-10 P.M.
HURON HOTEL & LOUNGE
124 Pearl-483-1771-(Ypsi.)

U

ive
-.

Daily Photo by TERRY McCARTHY
Getting to kno w the viol
Prof. David Crawford, director of the Collegium Muicum, leads a lecture-demonstration on the lute,
viol, and other medieval instruments. The demonstration was part of a Medieval, Renaissance Col-
legium Coffee Hour held in the Law Quad yesterday.
Martina Arroya ma es

By ERIC OSTER
The opening performance of
Ars Musica's concert season is
a unique opportunity to exper-
ience Baroque music at its best.
Three guest musicians from
the Viola de Gamba Trio of
Schola Contorum Basitiensis will
be joining Ars Musica for an
evening concert entitled "The
Art of the Viola de Gamba" at
the University Reform Church
at 8 Sunday night. The visiting
group consists of August Wen-
zinger and Hammerlore Muel-
ler, two of the world's leading
viola de Gamba players, and
Robert Conant on harpsichord.
Ars Musica, an Ann Arbor bas-
ed group, was created to revive
the music of the Baroque Era
with local meetings and concerts.
Baroque music brought a new
wave of excitement, daring and
form to the arts of that era.
While scientists like Copernicus,

Kepler and Galileo were chal-
lenging our conceptions of the
universe, musicians like Mote-
verdi, Handel and Bach were
breaking out of the restrictive
musical patterns of the past.
Vivid colors and hues, detailed
solos and harmonies character-
ized the Chamber Music of the
time, but with an underlining
quietness which demands of the
listener the utmost in attention
which rewards the faithful with a
total emotional experience.
Members of Ars Musica believe
that in order to best present the
unique quality of the music both
the instrumentation and the per-
formance must be as authentic
as possible.
The society has many Baroque
instruments consisting of 17th
and 18th century violins, a bass
viol dated 1667 and copies of an
18th century oboe, a flute and a
harpsichord.

The Pauitsin their own way
to achieve their mission:
are trying to help Christ
thecommunicate
S ntthe ideas
challenger His mind
to the minds

expressive tidal

By ROY CHERNUS
Martina Arroyo, who has been
making tidal waves with her
near - legendary performances of
Verdi heroines, displayed her co-
pious talents in more intimate
circumstances at Hill Auditorium
Monday evening.
Her soprano is an instrument
blessed with thrilling vibrance,

and Handel and seven Gypsy
Melodies Op. 55 of Dvorak, Ar-
royo was a seething cauldron of
passion straying little from cli-
matic pitch. The more lyric
Gluck aria may have benefitted
by more closely matching Donal
Nold's lighter, crisper accom-
paniment, however.
Dvorak is certainly not known

i

ART.AS

waves
lucence. However, the, aura was
sometimes disturbed by her over-
bearing crescendos.
A liberal sampling of Spanish
vocol literature was offered in
de Falla's Seven Spanish Popu-
lar Songs and a few encores, The
mastery of De Falla's song cycle
is a formidable achievement, for
it demands technical brilliance
and encompasses a widebrange of
emotions.
While one might have wished
for a bit more rhythmic snap
and less mellifluousness in the
brazen, idiomatic sections, Arro-
vo's brooding laments, caressing
lullaby and breathtaking drama-
tic surges were exceptional.
Most accompanists would be
lost among all this, but Donal
Nold's sure-footed and respon-
sive playing aided and abetted
Arroyo effectively.
BRITISH ACTOR
HOLLYWOOD (UPI)-Cramah
Crowden, a leading English char-
acter actor, will play the role of
Cardinal Barberini in "The Abdi-
cation," starring Peter Finch
and Liv Ullman at Warner Bros.
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING RESULTS
ABORTION ALTERNATIVE
OFFERED BY
Probiean Pregnancy Help
24 hr. phone: 769-7283
Office: Basement-400 S. Division
(corner of William)
Hrs. Mon.-Thurs. 1 -4:30 p.r).
Thurs. evening 6-9 p.m.
FREE PREGNANCY TESTING

of today's world
in city streets
and suburban homes
on the campus
and in the parish
facing the issues
of poverty and peace
injustice and war
and listening
for sounds of love
and signs of hope
using their own talents

of all men
For more intormation about the
Paulists, America's first religious
comnunity, send for the PAULIST
PAPERS-a new vocation kit of
articles, posters and recordings.
Write to:
Father Donald C. Campbell,
Room 104
415 West 59th St., New York,N. Y.10019

plush sonority and enormous ex-
pressive amplitude. Shaping such
vocal resources into well-propor-
tioned phrasing and dramatic
sweep requires meticulous musi-
cianship indeed - and it was
p'resent for the most psrt.
In the opening group of Ba-
roque arias by Stradella, Gluck

for any distinction in the song
medium, but there are a general-
ly attractive group of popular
tune derivations, rendered all the
more so by Arroyo's devil-may-
care abandon and insolence.
Four songs by Faure brought
a welcome change in subtle dy-
namic shading and timbral trans-

DOUBLE FEATURE ALICE-7 P.M. MESS-9 P.M.
America's funniest comedy
team of the decade
Richie and Spiro.. .n the
absurd, last mooing
motion picture
- - ., got m e
,.,,,RICH [L L.,HERB VOLAND
. BRUCE KIRBY " DIHAN WILLAMS" STEWART BRADL.EY
. .h TOM SMOTHERS w., JONATHAN HAZE
w:« +a BO08EINSTEIN -. k, OBEMENEGGER
EASTMAN COLOR "A FINE FILMWR 0E ~

CULITURE CALENDAiR
FILM-New World Film Co-op presents H. G. Wells Triology:
War of the Worlds, Day of the Triffids and The Time
Machine at 6:30, 8:15 and 10 tonight, respectively, in Aud.
3, MLB. Pysch. Film Series presents Up is Down, Eye of
the Storm, Reggie and The Orange and the Green in
Aud. B, Angell, at 4. Cinema II presents Menzies' Invad-
ers from Mars in Aud.,A, Angell, at 7 and 9 Friday night.
Cinema II also presents Hitchcock's The Paradine Case
in Aud. A, Angell, at 7 and 9 Saturday night.
EXHIBITIONS-Projects by Industrial Design Students are
being show in Arch. and Design Bldg. today from 8:30 to
5.

iI

SCIENCE FICTION
TRIPLE FEATURE
-featuring
H. G. WELLS
WAR
OF THE
WORLDS
6:30 P.M

TONIGHT!
Wednesday-Thursday
1.00
Sunday Nov. 25
BOB SEGER GROUP
Nov. 27, 28,29
MIGHTY JOE YOUNG
.art *

H. G. WELLS
THE TIME MACHINE

1 show $1.25, 2 shows $2.00
3 shows $2.50--10 P.M.

a, s JOHN WINDHAN'S

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