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November 21, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-11-21

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Wednesday, November 21, 1973

I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage i nree

Wednesday, November 21, 1973 I HE MICHIGAN DAILY rage nree

11

Future still

uncertain

for Palestinian refugees

By PHIL NEWSOM
UPI Foreign News Analyst
Beyond the questions of cease-
fire, prisoner exchange and Is-
raeli withdrawal from occupied
Arab lands is another so far
receiving little attention but pos-
sibly the most difficult of all to
solve - the question of the Pales-
tinian refugees.
Of approximately three million
Palestinians, 1.5 million are re-
gistered refugees.
SOME ARE double refugees,
having first fled Palestine in the
1948 Arab-Israeli war and hav-
ing been caught up again in the
1967 war.
The Arab-Israeli wars all have
been emotional, religious and poli-
tical.
And among the refugees living
in camps - 85,000, for example,
in Lebanon alone - each of these
elements is developed to the
highest degree. Children growing
up angrier and more ideological
than their parents. Asked where
he comes from, a child w i l l
answer with the name of the vil-
lage his parents left but he has
never seen.
HAVING NO real leadersnip
and no real base, they are sub-
ject to the political whims of
their host Arab countries.
Egypt gives them lip service

but cares little about them. Sy-
ria would use them for control
of the Arab guerrilla movement
against Israel, Lebanon worries
about the possible upset in its
religious balance between Christ-
ian and Mohammedan.
Since Jordan has more Pales-
tinians than any other nation,
some 600,000, King Hussein re-
gards himself as their chief
spokesman. But that role is con-
tested by the more extreme of
the guerrilla leaders.
AT ANY RATE, it is a prob-
lem that has defied solution for
25 years and cost around $1 bil-
lion, most of it coming from the
United States.
The Arabs have insisted the
refugees are Israel's responsi-
bility and has demanded that
they be permitted to return to
their former homes. and be com-
pensated for their losses.
Israel had admitted some re-
sponsibility but has denied the
problem is hers alone. Besides,
she says, she will not permit re-
turn of people committed to her
destruction.

A SUGGESTION which Russia
has been trying out on guerrilla
leaders is for establishment of
an independent Palestinian na-
tion on the west bank of the
Jordan river. It is land Israel
seized from Jordan in the 1967
war.
King Hussein has proposed an
autonomous Palestinian state on
the west bank of the river in-
side a federated Kingdom of
Jordan.
Neither plan would be accept-
able to the Israelis, who would
regard such a Palestinian pre-
sence as a dagger pointed at Is-
rael's side.
ISRAEL HAS yet to come for-
ward with a concrete pian of her
own. After the 1948 war about
150,000 Palestinians remained in
Israel. About 80 per cent of them
accepted compensation fo,- lost
properties.
In East Jerusalem, w h i c h
Israel annexed two weeks after
its 1967 victory, it has offered
to compensate Arabs for 1 o s t
property on the basis of assess-
ed value in 1947 plus 25 per
cent. The cost has been esti-
mated as high as $100 million.

AP Photo
ISRAELI PREMIER GOLDA MEIR who met yesterday with the
Israeli cabinet to discuss an apparent deadlock in military talks
with Egypt.
israe1i cahinet meets

!1 A 11%11 l I ElI rUrKIl

LvAIL j T I LA L bULLI: I fJ THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 66
o v er tr u c e co iif 1ii ci ***-.*. ' J"..Y"."::"'s" s e dnsada November 21,1973
o v er ru ce lo lc ..r "::"..,....J ..... . ....",>:".J~r..,.....edited...and imanagedandbynastudentsdetsaa
Wednesday, November 21 Student Accounts: Your attention the University of Michigan. News phone
DAY CALENDAR called to following rules passed by Re- 764-0562. Second class postage paid at
JERUSALEM - (Reuter)- The Israeli cabinet met yesterday in Psychiatry: W. Horvath, "Health Ser- gents, Feb. 28, 1936: "Students shall Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
vices Research: Its Implications for pay all account due the University not daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
a series of high level Israeli conferences to consider an apparent dead- Mental Health Care," Children's Psy- later than the last day of classes of during the University year at 420 May-
chiatric Hosp. Aud., 10:15 am. each semester or summer session. Stu- nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
lock in military talks with Egypt on the question of establishing Oct. 22 Ctr. Russian, E. European Studies: B. dent loans which are not paid or re- Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
ceasefire lines and a fuller disengagement of forces. Stolz,"Serbio-Croatan Literary Lan- newed are subject to this regulation: pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and:
ceseir lne ad fllr isnggeen o frcs.guage," Lane Hall, noon, ;however, student loans not yet due Ohio): $12 non-local mail (other states'
Psych. Film Series: "Up Is Down;" are exempt. Any unpaid accounts at and foreign).
"Eye of the Storm;" "Reggie;" "The the close of business on the last day Summer session publishec Tuesday
determine though the chief Egyptian negotiator Maj. Gen. Mohamed Orange and the Green," Aud. B. An- of classes will be reported to the Cash- nrotSaturday morning.rSubscrip
gell Hall, 4 pm. ier of the University and "(a) All aca- Iion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus,
Abdel-Ghani Gamazi, is understood to have given the U. N. a map of Baratin: French House, 613 Oxford demic credits will be withheld, the iarea); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Rd., 8 pm. grades for the semester or summer ses- Itates and0fon).
where he considers they should be. GENERAL NOTICES sion just completed will not be re-
Health Service: will be closed Nov. 22- leased, and no transcript of credits will
23; Emergency Clinic (fee will be I be issued. "(b) All students owing such --
ISRAEL BELIEVES that one purpose of the Egyptian map is to charged Nov. 22-23) open Nov 22 & 23,
prove that the Egyptian Third Army, trapped on the east bank of the 8 am,-12 midnight; after midnightcall in any subsequent semester or summeATTr
Suez Canal, Was not encircled until after Oct. 22. This is disputed by 24 on reg. Sat. schedules. session until payment has been made."

7

the Israelis, who say the encirclement had been completed by then and
any changes in the line after that date were the result of Egyptian
violations.
Israel chief negotiator Maj. Gen. Aharon Yariv is understood to
have suggested a mutual withdrawal of Israeli and Egyptian forces
to the eve of the Oct. 6 war positions, involving a complete pullback
of Israeli forces from the bulge they now hold on the westbank of the
100-mile-long waterway, and a withdrawal of Egyptians from their
Sinai eastbank foothold.
United Nations peacekeeping forces would take up positions between
the two sides along a six-mile stretch on either bank of the canal.
THE SOURCES SAID the Egyptians sought a unilateral Israeli with-
drawal 25 miles east of the waterway to the strategic Mitla and Giddi
passes.

i

university players
presents the second
showcase production
1973-1974
of the ARENA THEATRE in the Frieze Building
and
miss
rea rdon
drinks
a
little
by PAUL ZINDEL

DON'T MISS THE
FIRST ANNIVERSARY
SALE AT
HOUSE OF IMPORTS
320 E. Liberty St.-Ann Arbor
OPEN 7 days a week 769-8555

"THIE NEW LAND" 1
ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE-BEST FOREIGN FILM
"A MAGNIFICENT ACHIEVEMENT THAT LEFT ME
BREATHLESS WITH ADMIRATION AND AWE."
-N.Y. Daily News
"A Masterly exercise in film-making. A lovely and moving film.
Uniform excellence."-N.Y. Times
HURRY -Wed., Thurs.,
Sat. and Sun.
MusEndAat 1:30,
4:30 and 7:30
Soon! 4 Fri., Mon. & Tue.
at 8 p.m. only

9
or

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Phone 764-0558

Nov. 29, 30, Dec.

1

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Box Office open Nov. 22-27, 12 Noon till 5 p.m.
PERFORMANCES AT 8:00 P.M.
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