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November 16, 1973 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

idcy, November 16, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

...-i~day, November 16, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY I'oge Seven

p

AGENCY REPORTS
U' police unit urged

(Continued from Page I)
as much as 200 per cent from 1971
to 1972.
The report terms the present
safety program "not effective in
providing the services required by
the, University" and claims the
University is "not receiving serv-
ices proportionate to funds ex-
pended."
A major drawback of the pres-
ent security system, according to
proponents of the IAPC plan, is
that Burns and University secur-
ity personnel are not empowered
to make arrests.
BURNS GUARDS "are not sworn
peace officers," says University
Council student member Miriam
Ross. "All they can do is stand
there and say, "I saw it happen,'
hut they can't do anything to help
us."
Further complaints against the
security operation include allega-
tions that guards are inadequately
trained and underpaid and lack
sensitivity to the University's phi-
losophy and needs, that city and
University criminal jurisdiction
lines are vague, and that the city
police department's "University
unit" devotes much of its time to
non-University calls.
However, response to the IAPC
proposal has not been uniformly
enthusiastic. One high University
official stated yesterday he con-
siders maintenance of a police
force inappropriate to the Univer-
sity's role as an educational in-
stitution.
THE REPORT admits that stu-
dents and employes interviewed ex-
pressed 1 concern that "improve-
ment must come without infring-
ing on the rights and human dig-
nity of the individual."
Specifically, the proposal's op-

ponents fear it might bring a re-
nressive political atmosphere to
the campus.
According to Ross, this will not
happen "if the plan is carried out
the w-y the council wants to see it
done."
DAVID FOULKE, superintendent
of security forces for student hous-
ing. said yesterday he feels it is
urgent that student voices be heard
on the proposal.
"I would guess the majority of
students would favor it," Foulke
said. "The students who are here
after 7:30 p.m. when the crime
occurs are the ones who will really
be affected - especially the stu-
dents living in the residence halls."
"I'd like to know why we're the
only Big Ten school without a cam-
pus police force," Foulke added.
IN THE PAST, city officials have
opposed formation of a separate
campus law enforcement group on
the grounds that the independent
jurisdictions would lack clear geo-
graphical boundaries.
City Deputy Chief of Police Har-
old Olson said yesterday he is not
familiar enough with the IAPC re-
port to comment, but conceded that
the diffuse lay-out of the University
campus would cause an overlap
between theactions of two sepa-
rate forces.
"If they (University police) have
the power to make arrests, they're
going to have to make them if they
see crimes committed on the
streets," Olson claimed.
HOWEVER, he said a "co-op-
erative sort of situation" like the
one between city county law offic-
ials., would be possible.
University Director of Safety
Frederick Davids was unavailable
for comment.

"POWER T OBE HUMAN MIDST THE ISSUES of the '70's"
SUNDAY NIGHT SERIES, NOVEMBER 18
SPEAKER: David Noel Freedman, E.D., Ph.D.; Director, Program on
Studies in Religion and Professor in the Department of Near Eastern
Languages, University of Michigan: was Professor of Hebrew and Old
Testament Literature at Western Theological Seminary and Pittsburgh
Theological Seminary: Dean of Faculty at San Francisco Seminary
and the Graduate Theological Union. Dr. Freedman has held a number
of lectureships in the USA. Bonn, Tokyo and Jerusalem. He was
Associate Editor of the Journal of Biblical Literature. editorial con-
sultant of the Interpreter's Dictionary of the Bible, and is editor of
the Anchor Bible Series.
TOPIC: "ISTORY AND RELIGION"
TIME: 7:30-9:00 p.m.
PLACE: ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER, 921 Church Street
Sponsored by: The Ecumenical Campus Center
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SCHOOL of MUSIC presents
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English Translotion
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November
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EUGENE ONEGIN
March 21-24
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OSEF BLATT
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RALPH HERBER
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THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC
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NOVEMBER 17, 18-8 P.M.
RESERVED TICKETS $3.50
Box Office: 12:30-8:00 P.M.
INFORMATION CALL: 764-0583
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TUESDAY AFTERNOON, November 20th-2 p.m.
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