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November 16, 1973 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-11-16

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Fri4ay, November 16, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, November 16, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Le Souffle Au Coeur
Cinema II, Aud. A
Sun., 7 & 9
Well, who ever thought incest
could be funny? French director
Louis Malle's Le Souffle Au Co-
eur is actually a comedy based
on that verboten subject - a
comedy which sets out- to prove
that yes, Virginia, sex with your
mother can indeed be fun.
Lea Massari portrays a bored
upper-middle-class wife sick of
her humdrum lifestyle - some-
thing that seems a little puzzling,
considering the household con-
tains two thieves and an art forg-
er. Nevertheless, she decides to
pep up her life and that of her 15-
year-old son by personally intro-
ducing him to the fine points of
lovemaking.
Strange bedfellows, to be sure.
But if you can sit through this
weird plot and one of those run-
of-the-mill weak endings, you'll
see why Murmur received con-
siderable praise at the Cannes
Film Festival a couple of years
back. You may also consider
yourself a nominee for the Gross
Film Lover of the Year Award.
-DAVID BLOMQUIST
A King in New York
rind Portnoy's Complaint
Friends of Newsreel,
MLB, Aud. 3, 4
Fri., Sat., 7:15, 9:30
The brilliant master of cinema,
Charles Chaplin, brings us a
masterpiece made during his
self - exile from the U. S. - A
King in New York (1957).
Written, scored, directed by,
and starring Chaplin himself,
King has unfortunately been an
impossible film to obtain; it has
never had a formal release in this
country.
Billed as "a satiric spoof of an
American gone crazy," this pic-
ture made in Great Britain is not
to be missed.
The lesser half of the double-
feature is that triumph in bad

taste, Portnoy's Complaint, star-
ring Richard Benjamin and the
shrieking Karen Black. With the
exception of a hilarious perform-
ance by Lee Grant as Mrs. Port-
noy, this film should be shown
only in men's restrooms where
it belongs.
It has taken a perfectly mar-
velo'is book and destroyed it quite
efficiently.
-MICHAEL WILSON
Frenzy
UAC Mediatrics, Nat. Sci. Aud.
Fri., Sat., 7, 9:30
A necktie murderer stalks Lon-
don in Hitchcock's most recent

emerges on the screen as first-
rate entertainment, with Laur-
ence Olivier as Heathcliff and
David Niven, Geraldine Fitzger-
ald and Merele Oberon in lesser
but convincing roles.
Although the original story is
a bit cut up and the whole thing
was shot in America, Wyler's
masterpiece is still a refreshing
pause from the banal offerings
coming out of Hollywood today.
-MICHAEL WILSON
Arsenic and Old Lace
Cinema Guild, Arch. Aud.
Fri., 7, 9:05
About the only thing this

akawa is their captor, a man who
is respectful of the British colo-
nel's energy and determination
and, at the same time, mystified
by that same colonel's apparent
eagerness to help the Japanese
w:ir effort.
Bridge Over the River Kwai
is a gre-t film and exciting enter-
tainment, powerfully acted by
Guiness, Haiy-kawa, and Holden
and masterfully directed by Da-
vid Lean (Lawrence of Arabia,
Dr. Zhivago).
-JAMES HYNES
Jeremy
Michigan
If you've ever been in love, if

if you have to read it, the movie
will seem choppy and preten-
tious because of what it omits.
Director Joseph Strick's liter-
ary bent might be familiar to
those who saw his castrated ver-
sion of Tropic of Cancer earlier
this semester. One wonders what
drives him to try to turn the ac-
knowledged great literature of
the 20th century into pale sha-
dows of their former selves on
the screen.
-PHILIP MIROWSKI
Walking Tall
State Theatre
Hailed as this year's Billy

UNIVERSITY
OF
MICHIGAN
Residential
College
ART
FACULTY
SHOW
at the
UNION
GALLERY
OPENING
RECEPTION
TUES.., NOV. 13
8-10 P.M.
MUSIC by R.C.
music ensembles

cinemo

weekend

ABRAM KROL-BARBARA BRODSKY
SUSAN CROWELL-EDWINA DROBNY
6RITA MESSENGER-DIBERT

:: :::.

flick, F r e n z y. No attractive
young woman is safe while the
psychopathic strangler is on the
loose.
Hitchcock's black humor shines
in this well-acted thriller, which
promises a tight, enthralling
plot. Watch.for Hitchcock's well-
known secretive appearances,
first in the crowd of horrified
onlookers at the beginning of the
filh, and then possibly as the
killer's mother.
-STAFF
W tihering Heights
Cinema II, Aud. A
Fri., 7, 9:30
There are many reasons why
this film is still so alive after
all these years: one of them is
Greg Tol-nd's beautiful photog-
raphy and another is Ben Hecht's
snappy script.
Directed by William Wyler in
1939, Bronte's Wuthering fleights

macabre comedy has to recom-
mend it is Cary Grant. Arsenic
(1944) is a tribute to his talents.
Josephine Hull plays an old
lady who poisons people, and
good-natured Cary finds out.
Raymond Massey, perhaps still
remembered best from the old
Dr. Kildare series, has a feature
role as Grant's cohort.
-MICHAEL WILSON
Bridge Over the
River Kwai
Cinema Guild, Arch. Aud.
Sat., 7, 9
Bridge Over the River Kwai
can be viewed as an adventure
epic, as a prison camp drama,
or, most importantly, as a bril-
liant study in the conflict of
priorities.
Alec Guiness gives one of his
best performances as the colo-
nel of captured British soldiers
in World War II Burma. He sees
his duty as protecting the wel-
fare and morale of his men. In
order to do that, he builds a stra-
tegically important bridge for the
enemy.
William Holden is diametri-
cally opposed as an American
prisoner who sees his duty as de-
stroying the bridge. Sessue Hay-

you are in love, or if you are
planning to be in love in the
near future, don't see Jeremy.
This film made a smash hit when
it opened in New York a few
months back but the whole pack-
age is pure alligator tears -
how anyone could like this
charmingly nauseous indictment
of youthful romance is beyond
me.
Jeremy is a cello player and
the girl of his dreams is a danc-
er; together they fall in and out
of love for the first time. Half-
way through the picture you be-
gin to wish they would conceive
a suicide pact and end the whole
business in a big splash of car-
bon monoxide.
-NICHAEL WILSON
UJlysses
Cinema II, Aud. A
S't., 7, 9:30
Ulysses is a very self-conscious
adaptation of James Joyce's
seminal novel. More so than
other movies, the experience of
viewing it is inextricably tied to
the experience of reading the
book.
If you haven't read Ulysses
first, then the movie will en-
courage you to do so, as long as
the dry, static scenes don't
turn you off. On the other hand,

A bdelicate balance'
marks string quartet

Jack, Walking Tall is a film that
doesn't leave you feeling any-
thing but amazement that pic-
tures like this are still being
made. Maybe if Johnny Cash had
played the female lead it would
have worked, but it comes off as
just another violent vehicle for
super-fascist Joe Don Baker,
who gets his thrills kicking peo-
ple for a big salary and rates as
this year's "hot" box - offict
talent.
--MICHAEL WILSON
Also . .
The Campus presents The New
Land.
Cinema Guild features Straub's
Chronicle of Anna Magdelina
Bach Sunday at 7 and 9 in Arch.
Aid.
New World Media presents Yo
Soy Chicano and Requiem 29
free tonight in UGLI-M'iltipur-
pse Room at 8. Both films con-
cern La Raza, and speakers from
United Farm Workers and Far-
:ih Strike Committee will be pre-
sent.
All interested
ISRAELI DANCERS,
contact Sue Baker,
761-8931. Come
to a MASS MEETING
Tues. 27 Nov.
H I LLEL, 1429 Hill St.
i s

"GOOD E-V-E-N-l-N-G"
mediatrics presents
ALFRED H ITCHCOCK'S
FRENZY
The latest, greatest, chillingest thriller
by the Master of .jhe Macabre
Fri. and Sat.
v n17:0and 9:30Not. Si.Aud.
Nov. 16 and 17
$100

By KEN FINK
The Tel Aviv String Quartet
presented a program Wednesday
night in Rackham Aud. boasting
a diverse musical content span-
ning the Mozart Clarinet Quintet
with Yona Ettlinger playing the
clarinet to the Bartok String
Quartet No. 3.
The quartet played with a most
striking unity of interpretation,
sounding as if all the members
were of the same mind and dis-
For review of the San Francis-
co Mime Troupe, see Edit Page,
opposite.
playing a most delicate balance.
The program begin with the
dynamic Bartok Third, played
with the conciseness that does
true justice to Bartok's middle
period. This is Bartok's shortest
quartet, written in a continuous
four movements that mainly con-
sists of the development of a few
motifs so that the actual form
is closer to an ABAB design.
It is this motific development
that makes this a blatantly non-
lyrical quartet. The quartet dis-
plays much of Bartok's "flavor"
in its ute of unusual tone colors

and sonorities such as glissandi,
pizzicati and sul ponticelli.
The Bartok was followed by a
magnificent performance of the
Mozart Clarinet Quintet. This is
one of the first major pieces in
the clarinet renetoire and bares
resemblance to Mozart's own
clarinet concerto and oddly
enough to a Beethoven clarinet-
bassoon duo.
Ettlinger and the quartet play-
ed the quintet in a lyrical and
strikingly romantic style. Ettlin-
ger displayed a beautiful full-
bodied sound that was blended
with the quartet in a pleasing
balance.
The Schubert Quartet Op. 161
nrovided quite a contrast to the
Bartok work in the same genre.
Schubert does not concern him-
self with short motific ideas but
is a melodic genius in his em-
ployment, of long spun-out lyrical
phrases.
The "tonal travelling" in the
ouartet is done in a fascinating
form "instant modulation" where
Schubert, without going through
a bridge section, immediately
changes keys. The piece was
played with a sensitive equili-
brium both dynamically and in-
terpretively.

A

THE BLACK
WOMEN'S CAUCUS
OF STOCKWELL HALL
cordially invites everyone
to GENESIS-The Opening
and Dedication of the
ROSA PARKS
CULTURAL LOUNGE

FROM "THE
Dream, Came
Struggle to

Ronse Parks.

Gwe'n Brooks.

i*

A NEW
LAND...
A NEW
HOPE.
y /

EMIGRANTS"
the Settlers'
/ Survive ..
'THE NEW
LAND' IS
WONDERFUL.
DIRECTOR
TROELL IS A
FILM
MATER.#
-Pauline Kael,
The NeN Yorker

and the Trotter House
Choir will be present.

\J/

I

*
II

STOCKWELL HALL'S MAIN LOUNGE
SUNDAY, NOV. 18, 4:00 P.M.
U- -

Max von Sydow 0 Liv Ullmann
"THE NEW LAND" w
ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE-BEST FOREIGN FILM

Etchings & Watercolors
by
NICOLE T. LEVIN
Nov. 17th-Dec. 7th
GALERIE JACQUES-2208 Packard

America's funniest comedy
team of the decade...
Richie and Spiro... in. the
absurd.last mving
motion picture
r
-u,,ve dt me

"A MAGNIFICENT ACHIEVEMENT THAT LEFT ME
BREATHLESS WITH ADMIRATION AND AWE."
-N.Y. Daily News
"A Masterly exercise in film-making. A lovely and moving film.
Uniform excellence."--N.Y. Times
HurryFri., M .
Tue. at 8pm.
only
Mlt End P S
Sat. &~ Sun. at
1:30, 4:30,
& 7:30

as

M. TIAM

0-0

"JEREMY" HAS NOTHING GOING
FOR IT EXCEPT THE PEOPLE
WHO LOVE
IT.

BLACK ARTS and CULTURAL FESTIVAL

RICH LITTLE.HERB VOLAND
sBUCE KRAY . DIIAN WKLIAMS . STEWART RALEEY
EA$TOMSMOTHERS NATHMA HAZE
wow 808 , SEINSTEIN " 5r 808EMENEGGER
EASTMAN COLOR " A F~fE iMS UMEW 0

now yoU can SEE
anything you want
M at ..
ARLO GUTHRIE
COLOR by DeLuxe United Artists

Fl
!
9
0

I

November 16-18
RI DAY ... a weekend o
Opening Reception- 4-7:30 p.m. and dance by bi
Black Art and Photograph Exhibit-4-7:30 p.m. performers.
All events FREE
Gospel Concert-8 p.m.
featuring "THE TROTTER SINGERS" All events held i
"ALTAR CHOIR OF SECOND BAPTIST"
corner of East U
Hill streets.
SATURDAY
* Black Art and Photography Exhibit-10 o.m.-8 p.m.
* Black Craft Demonstrations-10 a.m.-7 p.m.
* Poetry Reading-2-4 p.m.
0 Jazz Concert- 8 p.m.
feoturing "WENDELL HARRISON AND TRIBES"
"THE BLUE MIST"

Df art, music, dram,
rck artists and
E.
n East Quadrongle,
niversity and

"A stinging, zinging,
swinging sockC-it-to
them doooey. Will
leove yeyl helpless
with Iai4gter"
-Westinghouse
Radio

xIv

Special late show
Fri. & Sot.
10:30 p.m.
Sep. Adm.

-IM

It's about
the- - f time

I

I

I I rz _ :A

I.

.

C l IL~nAY

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