100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1973 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, November 8, 1973

THE MTCFiTGAN UAILY

Dems success tied to
non-Watergate issues

I

'TN F

.I

I

AP Photo
EGYPTIAN SOLDIERS in amphibious vehicles, watched by Finnish U.N. observers, ferry supplies
to the trapped Egyptian Third Army.
Egypt to resume
full diplmatic relat ions

By DON McLEOD
AP Political Writer
WHILE THE DEMOCRATS on
balance appear to have come
out on top in Tuesday's elections,
the chiefs of both major parties
agree that Watergate had little
to do with it.
Instead, Democratic National
Chairman Robert Strauss and Re-
publican George Bush said in
separate news conferences, the
real test was their efforts in re-
building troubled parties. Both
said yesterday they saw evidence
of their own success.
Watergate doesn't appear to
have been a determining factor,"
said Bush, who has been cam-
paigning to persuade the nation
that the party shouldn't be blam-
ed for scandals at the White
House. And Strauss, who has
been warning Democrats against
a false sense of security, said,
"I don't think the elections were
a Watergate referendum."
DEMOCRATS IN GENERAL
did well, however, especially in
New Jersey, where they recap-
tured the governorship and con-
trolled the legislature in a re-
cord - breaking performance.
In California, a referendum is-
sue championed by potential Re-
publican presidential candidate
Gov. Ronald Reagan went down
to defeat.
Democrats scored heavily in
important municipal elections
across the country, principally in
New York, where Abraham
Beame led a citywide Democra-
tic sweep which returned the
city to the party fold it left in
electing John Lindsay as a Re-
publican mayor eight years ago.
THE CLOSEST THING to Re-
publican glee came in Virginia
where the GOP retained the gov-
ernorship by a paper-thin margin
in a race with no Democratic

"I'm extremely pleased about
Virginia," Bush said at party
headquarters in Washington. "I
think it may have national sif-
nificance, because it continues
a trend in the state which could
extend across the borders of
Virginia."
Bush's confidence about the
Watergate issue was not shared
by Gladys Brooks, the Republi-
can candidate for mayor of Min-
neapolis who finished a distant
third. "A great deal of Water-
gate has carried over here," she
said.
IN THE MINNEAPOLIS race,
another possible trend might be
seen in the defeat of Mayor
Charles Stenvig, a tough law and
order proponent seeking a third
term, by a Democrat-Farmer
Labor candidate.
"Three or four of these police
chiefs got beat," Strauss said.
"People know now that law and
order doesn't just come from
electing a police chief as mayor.
They know it's got to come from
electing people who know some-
thing about the processes of gov-
ernment and meeting the needs
of the people."
In Louisville, Dr. Harvey
Sloane, a Democratic newcomer
to politics, beat Republican C. J.
Hyde, a former police chief, in
the mayor's race.
ANOTHER NEW black mayor
was elected in Raleigh, N. C.,
Clarence Lightner, a three-term
city councilman.
Nevertheless, top Republican
strategists say they did pretty
well considering the off-year na-
ture of the elections following
the national ticket's landslide
victory last year and in view of
the Washington scandals.
Bush says this might actually
favor his party in next year's
congressional elections because
it has fewer incumbents to risk
at the polls.

' 76* n~ 1970
HELD OVER 7:15, 9 p.m
"BRAVO
for this most sophisticated en-
tertaining, and delightfully sati-
rical comedy about changing
sexual mores and efforts, of
couples to keep pace."
-William Wolf, Cue Magazine
'ga

i

Last Showing before Xmas

NEW WORLD FILMS
presents

CAIRO (R) - Egypt and the
United States announced agree-
ment yesterday on an early re-
sumption of diplomatic relations
in the first apparent dividend for
Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer'spersonal diplomacy in
the Arab world.
"I think we are moving toward
peace," Kissinger declared af-
ter conferring for more than
three hours with President An-
war Sadat.
"I agree with him," said Sadat,
flashing a smile in the bright
sunshine. "For myself, let it be
immediate."
THE ACCORD to resume re-

lations was announced 'a f e w
hours later, closing a diplo-
matic gap opened by Egypt in the
1967 Arab-Israeli war because of
Washington's support for Israel.
The pleasant words after the
talks and the announcement of
restored relations were positive
signs in Kissinger's search for a
settlement to the Middle East
war of last month. They appar-
ently signaled Sadat's approval
of the American attempt to play
the role of middle man between
the Arabs and Israel.
Although no date was set for
normal restoration of diplomatic
relations, Egypt's Middle East
News Agency and the White

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Thursday, November 8 "Mechanics o fCrustal Earthquakes,"
DAY CALENDAR 1528 CC Little Bldg.. 4 pm.
Physics: Seminar on Nuclear Mo- tr Early Childhood Dev. & Educ.:
me sts:InemtiaratHighSinuCye o- H. Ginsberg, Cornell U, "Children's Un-
ments of Inerta at High Spin, .Cyclo- derstanding of Mathematics," Schor-
tron Lab, N. Campus, 1 pm. ling Aud.. 4 pm.
Physics: L. Radicati, "Current-Cur-
rent Interaction; u-Capture; u-Ab- International Night: Hungarian &
sorption," 205 P-A Bldg., 2 pm. Rumanian food, League Cafeteria, 5j
Economics: P. Wachtel, "Effect of Pm
School Quality on Schooling Achieve- University Players: Sternheim's "The
ment & Earnings," 2 45P-A Bldg., 3:30 Strongbox," Mendelssohn, 8 pm.
pm. Macromolecular Res. Ctr.: C. Car-
Mental Health Aesearch Inst.: F. man, B. F. Goodrich, "The Use of 13
Pitts, Washington Univ., St. Louis, CNMR for Determining Polymer Mo-
"Biochemical Basis of Anxiety," 1057 lecular Structure," Chem. Bldg., 8 pm.
MHRI, 3:45 pm. GENERAL NOTICES
Applications for 1974-75 Alumnae
Botany: A. Sercelj, Acad. of Se., Council Scholarships: Now available to
Yugoslavia, "Pleistocene Vegetationundergrad. & grad women;; basic to all
History in Southeastern Europe."139awards are criteria of academic achieve-
Nat. Ses., 4 pin. ment & financial need; obtain applies.
School of Natural Resources: H. Mil- from E. Bletcher, Gnd. Floor. Mich.
ler, Nat'l Park Serv., "Preservation Op- Union; deadline for return of applics.,
tions for asH itroetiSset -!
tions foor Historic Sites," 1036 S. T. Jan. 18.
Dana Bldg., 4 pm. CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
Architecture & Design: R. Dozier, 3200 SAB, 764-74601
"Black Builders of America: 1880-1925," INTERVIEWING ON CAMPUS: 11/8/
Arch. Aud., 4 pm. 73: Dun & Bradstreet; HEW-Mgt. In-
Geology, Mineralogy: W. Brace, MIT, tern Program; Geo. Washington Univ.,
__________________________Law: Aetna Life & Casualty; 11/9/73:
Columbia Univ., Grad School of Bus.;
THE MICHIGAN DAILY Villanova Univ., Law; N. Y. Univ., Law;
Volume LXXXIV, No. 55 Univ. of Penn, Wharton Grad Div.; N.
Volue LXXIVNo. 5 .Y. Life Ins.; 11/12/73: Cincinnati Mila-
Thursday, November 8, 1973 cron, Elec. Data Systems; 11/13/73:
Babson College, MBA; Elec. Data Sys-
is edited and managed by students at tems; 11/1473: Prudential Life Ins.; Tra-
the University of Michigan. News phone velers Ins., Montgomery Ward; 11/15/73:
764-0562. Second class postage paid at Fruehauf Corp.; Johnson & Johnson;j
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published IBM Corp.; Duke Univ, Law; & N. Y.
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning Life Ins.; 11/16/73: Chem. Abstracts
during the University year at 420 May- Serv., Ohio St. Univ.; Nat'l Community
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104. 11/19/73: Jordan Marsh=Flori-
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam- Services;
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and da.
Attention Women Students: You're'
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states invited to the third in series of in-
Summerand ign)session publishea Tuesday formal discussions of Career Opportun-
through Saturday morning. Subscrip- ities for Women, Fri., Nov. 9, 12 noon,
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus International Center Recreation Room.
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and Speakers will be reps from Columbia
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail lother Univ. Grad Sch. of Bus; Villanova
states and foreign). Univ. Law Sch; NYU Law Sch & Univ.
'of Penn. Wharton Grad. Div.
MUSKET
MASS MEETING

House said the two countries will
exchange ambassadors immed-
iately.
THIS WILL raise the level of
contacts, facilitating exchanges
that could follow as Kisisnger
pursues his attempt to find a
formula for bringing peace to
the war-scarred Middle East.
In a demonstration of the mid-
dle-man role adopted by the Unit-
ed States, Joseph Sisco, assist-
ant secretary of state for t h e
Near East, flew out of Cairo
for Israel soon after Kissinger's
talks with Sadat.
Meanwhile Israel claimed that
Egypt was preparing to renew
warfare while Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger was negotiating
in Cairo.
SYRIA REPORTED a clash on
the Golan Heights.
A spokesman for the Israeli
military command in Tel Aviv
said Egyptian troops were step-
ping up preparations for open
warfare and declared, "We aie
taking a very grave view of the
situation."
THE IRAELI radio said
Egypt's 1st Army, stationed in a
defensive position around Cairo,
had reportedly moved up toward
the Suez front ,apparently to
give it the possibility to break a
corridor through the Israeli lines
and open an escape route for the
trapped Egyptian 3rd Army in
the Sinai Desert.
The Israeli spokesman, "C o 1.
Nahman Karni, said he could
neither confirm nor deny the ra-
dio reports.
Egypt's official Middle East
News Agency described the sit-
uation on the Suez front as "tense
and explosive" and said the Is-
raelis on the west bank of the
canal were in pockets that could
easily be destroyed.

KURT VON N EGUT'S

2 SHOWS ONLY *

nominee.

Third White House'
tape alleged missing

SLAUGHTER HUSE FIVE
THURS., Nov. 8 ONLY-7:30 & 9:30

Modern Languages Aud. 4

May be seen with "Boyfriend" at
7:30-50c DISCOUNT

WASHINGTON UP) The testi-
mony of a presidential aide yes-
terday raised a question of whe-
ther part of yet a third White
House Watergate tape may be
missing or nonexistent.
White House aide John Ben-
nett testified before U.S. ))is-
trict Court Judge John Sirica
that the President's personal sec-
retary, Rose Mary' Woods, ca;}-
ed Bennett into her office Tucs-
day to say she had discovered a
"gap" in a tape-recording male
of presidential conversations.'
BENNETT, an aide to W h i , e
House chief of staff Alexander
Haig, said Woods did not describe
the tape she was listening to and
he did not ask.

Bennett also said she told him
that she was not transcribing Wa-
tergate tapes and that his own
testimony of Tuesday - in which
Bennett said he was told that's
what she was doing - was
wrong.
"She came into my office this
morning,"- Bennett said, "and
said in effect that it said in the
paper 'I'm transcribing tapes. I
did not transcribe tapes. That's
the wrong word. If I'm called as
a witness, I'm going to nave to
explain I did not transcribe
tapes'."
EXACTLY which tapes Woods
was listening to when she dis-
covered the gap presumable will
have to await her own testimony,
expected today.

NEW WORLD FILMS proudly presents
A LITTERIN
SUPER COLSSAL
SEART WARMINq

JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

.. ( '
~ r

I

E

IN

faded blue chambray, western style.

. the

polyester/cotton shirt that fades more and more
with every washing. Triple-buttoned sleeve,
yoke shoulders. Sizes S,M,L,XL. $11.

Twoiqy
IN KEN RUSSEWS PROdUCTION of
TIE BOY lNEND

-- --

. CIS 111(411

0

0

a

i

m

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan