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September 06, 1973 - Image 62

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-06

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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Order
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Today
764-0558

Touring groups highlight

local dance

experience

U

NEW BOOKS BY U-M AUTHORS

ERIC S. RABKIN
Narrative Suspense
"When Slim Turned Sideways . ..
Using the insights afforded by structuralism, linguistics, and modern
criticism, the author provides a seminal study of the function and
importance of narrative suspense in great literature. Eric S. Rabkin
is assistant professor of English at the University of Michigan.
$7.95

By KATHLEEN RICKE
Dance in Ann Arbor is a two-
fold art. There are numerous op-
portunities to see good dance
companies perform and limited
opportunities to dance yourself.
The University Musical Society
(UMS) is the principle sponsor
of touring groups performing on
campus. Last season UMS featur-
ed a variety of styles in dance
including folk, ballet and modern.
UMS's 1973-74 series promises
to be an interesting one, starting
out in October with the Ballet
Repertory Company of the Amer-
ican Ballet Theatre from N e w
York and moving on to the Bay-
anihan Philippine Dance Com-
pany. Ballet West, USA from
Hopwood
awards
Thanks to the b e q u e s t of
American dramatist Avery Hop-
wood, University students each
year are generously rewarded for
their creative writing efforts.
"The new, the unusual, and the
radical shall be especially en-
couraged," wrote Hopwood in his
will. Thus, for over 40 years, stu-
dents in University composition
courses 'have been eligible to sub-
mit manuscripts of drama, essay,
fiction, and poetry.
Manuscripts are r e a d by a
panel of judges of national repu-
tation. Recommendations a r e
made to a University committee
of judges who make the final
decisions concerning awards.
IF YOU ASPIRING writers
care to check out past award-
winning works, visit the Hopwood
Room, established in conjunction
with the Hopwood Awards unders
the direction of the late Prof.
Roy Cowden.
In addition to displaying win-
ning entries, the Hopwood Room,
1o06 Angell Hall, contains current
books and periodicals. It has been
described as an "oasis" in the
University, conducive to conver-
sation.

Utah will perform, followed by
the Claude Kipnis Mime Theatre.
In December another'folk com-
pany, the Krasnayarsk D a n c e
Company of Siberia with 80 danc-
ers and musicians is scheduled.
After Christmas the Norwegian
National Ballet and Roumanian
Folk Ballet precede the Nikolais
Dance Theatre from New York
which wraps up the season. The
Nikolais dancers are a well-
trained group performing con-
temporary dance.
MANY STUDENTS are inter-
ested in seeing companies come
to Ann Arbor that perform con-
temporary works. So, UMS has
appropriately expanded its pre-
viously primary folk agenda to

include more modern ballet and
modern-trained dance gr-ups.
The Ann Arbor Civic Ballzt
provides an unusual opportuni TV
for students interested in study-
ing classical ballet. Auditions are
held in the fall for new company
members, and classes are offer-
ed at all technique levels from
beginning to professional.
The Civic Ballet will perform
with the Ann Arbor Civic Orches-
tra at Pioneer High School on
Oct. 7. Their program will in-
clude Lessylphides, choregraph-
ed by Christine Ellis.
The University dance dept. cf-
fers a variety of classes open to
students in all colleges. T h e
schedule includes technique ses-
sions concentrating on African

dance, ballet, modern, jazz, Is-
raeli, international folk, square
and social dance, and dance con-
position.
MOST OF THE instructors in
the department are University-
trained dancers. Some of the
more advanced students perform
in University concerts as t h e
University dance troupe.
The University 'also sponsors
international folk dancing every
Friday evening at Barbour gym-
nasium. The first hour is devot-
ed to teaching new dances while
the remainder is usually taken
over by a few exhibitionists who
seem concerned more with per-
forming than having fun. They
have been known to spoil the

evening for those less knowledge-
,blQ in _dance than themselves,
b'it this is a new year and per-
haps there will be some new
f i:.es to liven things up. Occas-
ionally ethnic bands provide
music to dance to, which makes
for a more festive evening.
The University Activities Cent-
er and student radio station
WCBN have been known to spice
up dorm life with weekend 1950's-
style sock hops. But with the
graduation of some membersof
lip-syncing favorites Jimmy and
the Javelins and Chasity and the
Belts; the events may prove to
be less '"exciting."
AND FINALLY, if you're into
belly dancing (as a few Repub-
licans on City Council apparent-
ly are), try the Star Bar on
Main St. - directly across the
street from City Hall.
Olga, the bar's owner had been
having some trouble getting a li-
cense for dancers due to a city
ordinance prohibiting "cabaret"
(topless or "girlie") entertain-
ment, but with a little help from
their friends, the belly dancers
are back.

I

YEHESKEL HAS E NELD and
RICHARD A. ENGLISH, Editors
Human Service Organizations
A Book of Readings
Foreword by WILBUR J. COHEN
This comprehensive collection brings together for the first time the
essential literature on the structure and functioning of organizations
providing services to people: schools, employment agencies, mental
health clinics, correctional institutions, welfare agencies, and hos-
pitals. Yeheskel Hasenfeld is assistant professor of social work,
Richard A. English is associate professor and assistant dean of the
School of Social Work, and Wilbur J. Cohen is dean of the School
of Education, all at the University of Michigan.
- $15.00
paperbound $7.95
ABRAHAM KAPLAN
Love*... and Death
Talks on Contemporary and Perennial Themes
In these eleven talks-originally presented as the highly acclaimed
television series "The Worlds of Abraham Kaplan"-a great teacher
discusses the most important questions of traditional and contem-
porary human experience. Dr. Kaplan, for many years a professor
of philosophy at the University of Michigan, now lives, and teaches
in Israel. Illustrated.
$5.95

,.

MATTHEW ARNOLD
English Literature and
Irish Politics
Edited by R. H. SUPER
(The Completq Prose Works of Matthew Arnold, Vol. IX)
The latest volume in R. H. Super's highly praised edition includes
Arnold's most popular essays in literary criticism (written 1 879-81)
as well as his compassionate appeals on behalf of England's indus-
trial poor and the Irish. R. H. Super is professor of English at the
University of Michigan and author of The Time-Spirit of Matthew
Arnold.5
$15.00
KAN CHEN, KARL F. LAGLER, and MARK R. BERG,
E. DRANNON BUSKIRK, JR., DONALD H. GRAY, KARL
HERPOLSHEIMER, T. JEFFREY JONES, GEORGE KRAL,
J. C. MATHES, JOHN McGUIRE, DONALD N. MICHAEL,
STEPHEN M. POLLOCK, and RUTH REHFUS
Growth Policy
Population, Environment, and Beyond
In Growth Policy a team of experts presents a truly interdisci-
plinary and original approach to the environmental crisis and what
must be done about it. The resulting book is a very important con-
tribution to the growing literature on "spaceship earth." The authors
are all members of the University of Michigan faculty.
$12.95
paperbound $2.95
CYNTHIA EARL KERMAN
Creative Tension
The Life and Thought of Kenneth Boulding
The first intellectual biography of one of America's keenest and
wittiestsocial philosophers, who for many years taught at the Uni-
versity of Michigan. Illustrated with photographs. Cynthia Earl
Kerman, who did much of the research for this book while a graduate
student in American Culture at the University of Michigan, is now
assistant professor of English at Villa Julie College in Maryland.
$12.50

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SEPTEMBER *
/K i
K r
'K~Myra Breckinridge * A Man Called Horse 0 Tell *
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rK *
0 Strawberry Statement * Knock On Any Door *
'K (Bogart) 0 Journey Through Rosebud 0 Andro- *
'Kmeda Strain 0 Metropolis (Fritz Lang) *
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OCTOBER
* The Time Machine A Separate Pee0ace If
K * Silent Running " I Am Curious (Yellow) I I .
Am Curious (B I u e) 0 Ned Kelly (Mick Jagger)
* ! Satyricon 0 Waiting for Godot 0 Klute 0
* Magic Christian * The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter
'K *
NOVEMBER
Night of the Living Dead 0 Sounder 0 Burn
' Sometimes a G r e a t Notion 0 Cartouche!0*
THX 1138 and The Illustrated Man (Ray Bradbury)
'K * The Rain People * Diary of a Mad Housewife
0 Three Lives (Kate Millet)
DECEMBER*
* Billy Jack 0 Lady Sings the Blues M Slaughter-
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JANUARY
Zabriskie Point 0 Fortune and Mens Eyes 9 Mid-
* night Cowboy 0 Sunday, Bloody Sunday S Dark-
* ness, Darkness ! The Discreet Charm of the Bour-
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Kill Their Masters * Marat-Sade S Joe Hill
'K FEBRUARY .

Artists.' guild to sponsor art
festivals in Union ballroom

By DIANE LEVICK
supplement co-editor
Mushroom "art," ornate ma-
crame wall hangings, glass-blow-
ing demonstrations. . . and much
more can be found at the art
fairs in the Michigan Union ball-
room.
M i c h i g a n professional and
amateur artists come to theball-
room to display and sell their
handicraf.ts, creating a festive
yet diversified atmosphere for
the thousands who throng to it.

Three such fairs are schei
uled for this coming year, i
September, December, a n
March, by a newly-formed o
ganizing group, the Universit
of Michigan Artists and Craft
men Guild.
In addition to sponsoring th
ballroom fairs, the Guild, an a
sociation of'- amateur and prc
fessional artists, in conjunctio
with the University Activitie
Center now holds the Summe
Free Arts Festival.

d-
in
d
1r-
y
:s-
le

The Free Arts Festival, set up
on E. University, adjoins Ann
Arbor's annual, nationally known
street art fair. This main fair,
however, juries its applicants
because of space limitations, ac-
cepting several hundred out of
perhaps 4,000 applications.

FRESHMEN!3
ENJOY SINGING?
The U-M Arts Chorale meets Tuesdays and
Thursdays in Auditorium C, Angell Hall, 3 to
5 p.m.
Classical and Contemporary MUSIC
COME IN AND TRY OUT!

s- AS A RESULT of this proce-
dure and of high registration
s costs, artists have in past years
S setup their FreeArts Festival
r alongside the main one. The
Guild has accepted sponsorship
of the free fair in hopes of pro-
viding more services to the en-
trants.
Guild co-ordinator Victor tut-
man sees the group as more than
a festival-sponsoring organiza-
tion, however: "It's a co-oper-
ative venture - its members
will decide what it will do, like
buy supplies together, for ex-
ample. We want to foster some
kind of community spirit with
people from all parts of Michi-
gan.
Gutman hopes the Guild will
be able to secure discounts for
members at art shows and sup-
ply stores as well as compile a
list of art fairs and other art-
related events around Michigan.
The Guild will also start a bi-
monthly newsletter relevant to
artists and craftsmen.
RECYCLED-

{

JACOB M. PRICE
France and the Chesapeake
A History of the French Tobacco Monopoly, 1674-1791, and of
Its Relationship to the British and American Tobacco Trades
Price's monumental and definitive work is at once a representative
study in the interrelations of statecraft, finance, commerce, and
society in the ancien regime and a remarkable account of the func-
tioning of a particular monopoly. Jacob M. Price is professor of
history at rhe University of Michigan.
2 vols. boxed set-$35.00

FOR
PEOPLE
WHO
WALK
ON THIS
EARTH:..
u S. Patent No 335941
The specially engineered sole imitates walking on sand
barefoot, and forces you to walk with good posture-reduces
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city.
For men and women in shoes, sandals, sabots and boots,

imrUK Iwt
CLOTHING
" 40 s Jackets
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LYNN EDEN
Crisis in Watertown
The Polarization of an American Community
Nominated for the 1972 National Book Award
in Contemporary Affairs
In the participants' own words, this remarkable book provides a
granhic nortrait of a small town in middle America. and of the crisis

Cord Coats

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