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November 02, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-11-02

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Friday, November 2, 1973

I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

F'age Three I

*

i

Karleton Armstrong
jailed for 23 years

I

IM

-MADISON OP) - Karleton Arm-
strong, who pleaded g'illv to
charges in the 1970 University of
Wisconsin bombing that killed a
physics researcher, was sentenc-
ed yesterday to 23 years in prison.
"Long live the revolition," the
bearded Armstrong shouted after
Circuit Judge William Sachtjen
sentenced him on a second-degree
murder charge.
The 27-year-old former Univer-
sity of Wisconsin student walked
out of the courtrdom with his right
fist raised in salute. Supporters in
the audience responded, "Right
on, Karl."

government has been running
wild," defense attorney Melvin
Greenberg said.
ATTORNEY William KunstleJ,
who defended the Chicago Seven,
said he thought Sachtjen should
have given Armstrong a shorter
sentence.
"I know it was hard for him, and
if he had taken more time I don't
think he could have done it,
Kunstler said.
"I think he missed i great op-
portunity for reconcilation and to
set a precedent far beyond the
importance of this particular
case:"

CLARK MacGREGOR-, who directed president Nixon's re-election campaign, answers a question dur-
ing his appearance before the Senate Watergate Committee yesterday.
M acregor claims innocence
o invovement in Watergate

SACHTJEN also sent.aced Arm- KUNSTLER said Armstrong's
strong to indeterminate terms of act was "not the willful ac* of a
up to 15 years for arson and 10 B52 bomber or the president of
years for transporting explosives, the United States . . . it was a well-
to run concurrently with the sec- motivated and well-intentioned
ond-degree murder term. act."
Armstrong, who has been in cus- In his closing argum4nts, assist-
; tody since his arrest in Canada ant state Atty. Gen. Michael Zale-
early last year will be eligible for member of the "lunatic fringe" in
parole if five years. He still faces ski described ' Armstroag as s
federal charges in connection with member of the "lunatic fringe" in
the bombing, in which physici3t the Madison peace movement and
Robert Fassnacht, 33, was killed.said he needed rehabili-ation.
Armstrong, who had bean charg- Zaleski said testimony at the
ed with first-degree murder in presentence hearing was "totally
1 Fassnacht's death, pleaded guihy irrelevant and immaterial."
in September to the reduced charge He said Armstrong was "a sick
Sunder a plea bargain ii which the personcrying out for rezogrtion,"
prosecution agreed to reommend a but that he should not get off with
25-year sentence. a "slap of the wrists."

L

,..

WASHINGTON (P) - F o r m e r
Nixon campaign manager Clark
MacGregor testified yesterday, he
was used and deceived in the Wat-
ergate affair and said the Presi-
dent should submit to questioning
by the Senate Watergate commit-
tee's two ranking members.
In a separate statement, S e n .
Barry Goldwater, (R-Ariz.), said
an apearance by Nixon before the
full Watergate commiu:e may cf
fer the President the only way out
of problems of credibility that now
beseige him.
A third formula was offered by
Sen. Lowell Weicker, (R-Conn.),
who suggested the President' be
asked to invite the entire panel to
the White 'House and submit to
complete questioning.
WEICKER SAID that the. corn-
mittee will vote on his proposal at
its next executive session and that
most Watergate committee mni
bers have greeted the idea enthus-
iastically.
Weicker said no oath should be
required of the President, but in-
sisted that a transcript of the pr:)-
posed session be made public..
Testifyiing before th, commit-
tee, MacGregor, a former Minne-
sota congressman ad White House
aide, said he,believes Nixon migllt
be willing to submit to questions
put informally by We -gate Chair-
man Sam Ervin Jr., (D-N.C.), and
Vice Chairman Howard B a k e r
Jr., (R-Tenn.).
MacGREGOR TOLD newsmen he
had not checked his idea with
Nixon before offering it to the
* committee.
In his testimony, MacGregor dis-
puted parts of the testimon,' of two
previous witnesses and said of his'
campaign experiences:
"It doesn't make one happy to
learn that one has oeeii used."
MacGREGOR singled out former
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, No. 50
Friday, November 2, 1973
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106: Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail .(other states
and foreign).
Summer session, publishe Tuesday
through Saturday .morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail ;other
states and foreign).

White House counsel John Dean HE CONTRADICTED previous
and Jeb Stuart Magruder, his im- testimony in which Robert Mar-1
mediate subordinate at Nixon's re- dian, a lawyer for the Nixon re-!
election committee, as having used ,election committee, said MacGre-I
him.', gor refused to listen when he told!
"I think I ought to make it cry- him there was serious "exposure"
stal clear- that I do not include in the Watergate affair by key1
the President of the U n i t e d committee officials.
States," MacGregor said. "His re- MacGregor said he was kept ig-
lations with me have been trust- norant about the Watergate affair I

THE AGREEMENT enabled
Armstrong's attorneys to present
testimony as to motivativi for the
bombing in a two-week presenterIce
hearing that ended last Friday.
Defense witnesses included Pen-
tagon papers case defendant An-
thony Russo and antiwar activistt
Philip Berrigan. Testimony attack-
ed United States involvement in!
Vietnam and attempted to link
activities at the Army Mathemat-
ics Research Center with military
projects.
"Democracy means people must'
act to stop the government when
it runs wild, as it is clear o u r

U

11-

MOTION

PICT-URES'

worthy . ."
MacGregor took charge of Nix-
on's re-election committee, replac-
ing former Atty. Gen. John Mit-
chell, two weeks after- the June
17, 1972 break-in at Democratic
National Headquarters.
HEARINGS BEGIF

and the involvement of some cam-
paign and administration officialsF
in it.
After hearing MacGregor in the
morning, the committee recessed
its public hearings until next Tues-
day. No witnesses were announced.'

111

SATYAJIT RAY WEEKEND
CHARULATA

This Indian master, best known for his apu trilogy, returns with, an
exquisitely told story of a woman whose husband neglects her and is
oblivious to her loneliness.

Senate question's Ford

Sat.: RAY'S KANCHENJUNGHA
Sun.: RAYS THE ADVERSARY
Next Week: JOHN FORD FESTIVAL

WASHINGTON (P) - Vice Presi-
:ent-designate Gerald Ford denied
at his confirmation hearings yes-
terday any wrongdoing in the hand-
ling of $11,500 in campaign funds
which he did not report to t h e
House.
Itemizing each of the five checks
involved, Ford said that to the best
:f his knowledge they were report-;
ed by the donors in proper public
documents and subsequently re-
ported by the Republican Congres-
sional Campaign Committee as re-
quired by law.
The funds involved were contri-
buted to Ford in 1970 and chan-
neled to the Republican Congres-
sional Campaign Committee which
then sent a similar amount to the
Michigan congressman'sdistrict.
ALTHOUGH FORD did not re-
port the contributions in his per-
sonal statement of campaign fin-
ances filed with the House, he
said they weretalltproperly re-
corded in other places.
Ford also offered himself as a
peacemaker and mediator in al
crisis-ridden government saying, "I
can be a helpful bridge ,between
the executive and the legislative
branch."
Ford called the 5th congres-
sional district of Michigan, which
has elected him to Congress 13
times, "a moderate electorate, and
my own views are not as conserva-
tive as might have been implied.
"I CONSIDER myself a moder-
ate certainly on domestic affairs,"
Ford said, "a conservative on fis-
cal affairs and an internationalist
on foreign policy."
In regard to the 1970 campaign

funds, Ford said he got more mon-
ey than he feeded and sent it to
the GOP committee' to distribute to
others. He said he sometimes told
donors to send money directly to
the House GOP campaign commit-
tee rather than to his campaign.
"Historically, a person in thvd
leadership capacity does get con-
tributions . . . that are way above
our needs for campaigns," said
Ford, the House minority leade".
FORD SAID there was no under-
standing between him and the

"I believe in this case -here is
no violation of the laws whatso-
ever," Ford said.
Ford also denied that the money
he got from the GOP committee
exceeded the limit set by Michigan
law. Ford said the law requires1
that no candidate may spend more
than $10,500 on his own behalf. He
said some money went to commit-
tees other than to the Ford forj
Congress Committee, of which he
was treasurer.
"LATE IN the campaign several
other committees had been estab-
lished on my behalf," Ford said.'

HAND-MADE
FUR JACKET
WE HAVE THE LARGEST
SELECTION OF SHEEPSKIN
COATS IN ANN ARBOR
NOW ON SALE
HOUSE OF IMPORTS
Mon. & Fri.-'til 9
Tues., Wed., Thur., Sat.-'til 6
320 E. LIBERTY
ANN ARBOR-769-8555

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT
at 7 and 9:05

Architecture Aud.
Adm. $1

**TONIGHT & SATURDAY **

DAVID LEAN'S
LAWRENCE, OF

1962

ARABIAI

committee that the money be
neled back to him.

fun-

Like the desert itself, this film about the famous British soldier-adven-
turer, T.E. Lawrence, is vast, awe-inspiring, beautiful with ever chang-
ing hues, exhaustive, and wide screen. Peter O'Toole, Omar Sharif, Alec
Guinness, Anthony Quinn.

i

THIS WEEKEND!

CINEMA 1'
AUD. A ANGELL HALL

6:45 & 10:00p.m.
FRI. & SAT., NOV. 2, 3
Admission $1

The Leningrad Philharmonic
IN TWO DIFFERENT PROGRAMS:
Saturday at 8:30--all-Prokofiev
Sunday at 2:30--Rachmlaninoff and Prokofiev

SUNDAY FRENCH CINEMA: Jean Luc Godard's CONTEMPT

11

both in HILL AUDITORIUM

YNJOVEkT Y
@vIUSICAL O8GIETY
BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR Weekdays 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12
Hill Aud. box office open Sat. at 7 p.m., Sun. at 1:00
Phone: 665-3717

1111

PRESENTS

11

the movic at BRIARWOOD
Adjacent to J.C. Penney 0 769-8780 " 1-94 & S. State, Ann Arbor
STUDENT DISCOUNT DAILY FROM 1:30- (except Fri. and Sat.
eve.) ,75c OFF ADULT ADMISSION, School I.D. Reqd.
MOVIE, GEORGE SEGAL GLENDA JACKSON
1 TOUCH OF CLASS
(PG'
MOVIE 2 (PG)
HELD OVER 2ND WEEK
"BILLY JACK"
DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY
Wed.-Thur.-Fri. at 4:55, 7 & 9:05
Sat. at 10:30, 12:40, 2:50, 4:55,7 & 9:05
Sunday at 12:40, 2:50, 4:55, 7 & 9:05
MOVIE 3 (P.G.)
PIn MI UAIAL If it was murder,
wheres the
Basedonthe Tony Award FPO 4
Winni~gpBroa way play TWENETMCEMURY-FOX
Palomar Pictures International nt
Neil Simon's

I

the Colorful 16 Member Ensemble
Holiday in Greece

htwY YYY YY YY Y Y''

:rK *

F +++++++

- -

New world media international film series

'TTTT'r

-PRESENTS-

PROGRAM NO. 7

CINEMA, AFRICA

-FEATURING

A LUTA CONTINUA
Mozambique, 1971. Directed by Robert Van Lierop; photographed by Robert Fletcher. 32 minutes,
color. English language narration.A
"A LUTA CONTINUA is unquestionably the best available film on the African liberation struggle .
(it) not only portrays the texture and quality of life in free Mozambique with a sensitive and sympa-
thetic camera eye, but it also sets this portrait within an historical and political context."
-Southern African Magazine
TAUW
Senegal, 1970. Directed by Ousmane Sembene. 26 minutes, color. Wolof with English subtitles.
Directed by Ousmone Sembene, Africa's best-known film-maker, "Tauw" focuses on the anomie and
despair caused by Senegal's high rate of unemployment, and the generational clash, in which the old
still cling to Islam, polygamy, and paternal dictatorship, while the young' listen to rock, steal without
guilt, and grapple with man and womanhood in a rapidly changing society.
YOU HIDE ME
England, 1972. Directed by Kwate Nee-Owoo. 20 minutes, black arid white. English language commen-

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" HARRY LEMONOPOULOS (Bouzouki)--played for
Melina Mercouri in "Ilia Darling" and for Anthony Quinn
in "The Kings Dream"
* MARIA MELAGIA and FOTIS KOIS-Vocalists who
are the rage of the Plaka
* PROSSOS and TANDA-Choreography. See and Learn the
Sirtaki, the Zorra Dance and Many Others.

This SUNDAY,-Nov. 4-8 p.m.- a.m.

Direct from PLAKA

rhe Holiday will include:

e THE BIRDS-Rock, European Style

* PETRUS-plays fine clarinet (the Artie Shaw of Greece)

*

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