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November 01, 1973 - Image 10

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-11-01

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 1, 1973

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Thursday, November 1, 1973

STRIKE THREE

M

M

.1-1

r

Tuition
(Continued from Page 1)
yesterday. "I honestly don't have
any idea (how many students have
paid)," Smith told The Daily. But'
he added, "As far as I know,
we've not noticed any great change
in the level of cash flow."
SMITH ALSO refused to shed
light on another major money
question: the admitted likelihood
that the 24 per cent fee hike will
produce more revenue than the
University needs to fill its budget.
"We're still waiting for those
figures," he said. "I've been guess-
ing too much lately, and it's been
getting me into trouble. I'm not
going to give any new estimates
until I have one I can stand on."
President Robben Fleming, ds-
cussing the tuition issue in a forum
several weeks ago, promised to

strike f
"make all the numbers public"
but would not answer the quesion
of possible uses or rebate of extra
tuition money. Smith yesterday in-
dicated that a rebate to students,
isn't unlikely, s a y i n g, "That
wouldn't be high -on my list of
priorities."
SMITH, WHO announced last
month that he will soon resign his
position, is the key University of-
ficial in a controversy that has out-
lived the tuition strike: teaching
fellows' demands for renewed tui-
tion benefits and increased salary.
Groups of TFs within several de-
partments, who earlier fueled the
strike with messages of support,
have since organized the unoffi-
cially-titled Committee of Teach-
ing Fellows and demanded:
0 "a cost-of-living" salary in-

ides into

1

crease totalling 10 per cent over
last year's pay and excluding tui-
tion;
* reinstatement of TF benefits
removed this summer, including
in-state tuition for non-resident TFs
and their spouses, and a waiver of
spring half-term tuition for gradu-
ates with two prior semesters of
teaching fellowship;
0 a rollback of TF tuition to
last year's levels-the same de-
mand made in the student strike;
" creation of "a living wage"
for TFs and a total removal of tui-
tion for teaching fellows, effect!ve
in the fall term of 1974.
THE TF'S COMMITTEE present-
ed the demands to Smith at an
Oct. 12 meeting. Smith said he
was "glad for the chance to meet"
with the group and discuss their
.oycott

history
grievances, but added he could
make "no commitments" on finan-
cial issues until the University
knows how great its tuition income
will be.I
Smith later said he had "no way
of knowing" whether a substantial
number of TFs are represented by
the committee, but the committee
contends it speaks for at least SO -
per cent of the University's oo -
graduate teaching assistants.

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Demonstrators urge I

of Farah pants in local stores

(Continued from Page 1)
cident,.atlhough Ann Arbor police
dropped by the Fiegel store almost
immediately after the protest start-
ed to inform the picketers that
they had to keep moving and could
not loiter in front of the store.
MANAGER REACTION to the
pickets varied. The manager at
Fiegel's bluntly refused to estimate
the, effect of the pickets on busi-
ness, commenting, "I don't say
anything to those people down at
The Daily; they are all corn-
munists." There were few people
in the store.
A Fiegel's store employe snap-
ped pictures of demonstrators and
interested observers, He said he
was taking the photographs "just
so that people would know what
was going on."
One man carrying three pairs of
Farah pants neatly draped over his
arm, the Farah labels clearly
showing, rated a click.
Business at Marty's s e e m e d
slowed by the pickets. Owner
Marty Bush said, "They wouldn't

be picketing out there if
the whole story."

they knew

BUSH SAID he had complied
with a ACWU request to halt ad-
vertising for Farah pants. He also
claimed he had not ordered pants'
from Farah since June and had
no intention of doing so in the near
future. Bush had already ordered
his fall selection of clothes by the
time he stopped ordering, he said.
At Checkmate, the manager was
unperturbed by the picketers.
"Farah is only a minor line in our
store; we sell mostly Levi's," he
claimed. Despite the picketing,
there were quite a few customers
in the store.
The boycott has grown out of a
three-year dispute between Farah
management and the cutting room

workers in the plant. Nearly 85
per cent of the Farah workers are
Chicano women.
IN OCTOBER 1970 workers at
Farah's El Paso plant voted to
have a National Labor Realtions
Board (NLRB) sanctioned vote to
determine whether a union should
be established. The NLRB took
until 1972 to recognize the El Paso
group.
By that time union sympathizers
in the El Paso plant had walked
off the job, protesting botn the
work conditions and tne manage-
ment harassment of organizers.
The 18 month strike has been bol-
stered by supporters at other
Farah plants. At least 3,500 Farah
employes are now on strike.

TF committee member Laurie
Effron, an economics department
instructor, said she and others
came away from the Smiin meet-
ing "with a great feeling of mis-
trust in light of the way we've been
treated."
"RIGHT NOW there's a mo-
mentum building," Effron said
yesterday. "We're trying to get in-
put from people in all departments.
A whole gamut of different actions
has been suggested, but the con-
sensus is that somethingTrust be-
done."
She added that the suggestions
have included refusal to give
grades, refusal to teach for a
period of one day or one week,
and a full-fledged strike of indefi-
nite duration.I
Meanwhile, Smith indicated yes-
terday that thentuition strike has
brought about at least one un-
official decision: there will be no
fee hike next year.
"Not if I'm in my right mind,
he concluded. "We've had our fill
of trouble on this thing (tuition).'
No way should we go any higher.'
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