100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, November 1, 1973

CULTUR* cALEINIAR
FILM-Cinema Guild presents Wilder's Double Indemnity at
7, 9:05 in Arch. Aud.; Ann Arbor Film Co-op shows Cate's
I Never Sang for My Father in Aud. A, at 7, 8:45, 10:30;
New World Film Co-op presents Lumet's The Seagull at
7:15, 9:45.in Aud. 4, MLB and WR-Mysteries of the Or-
ganism in Aud. 3, MLB at 7:30, 9:45; South Quad Film
features Mash at 7:30, 9:45 in Dining Rm. 2, South Quad.
MUSIC-The Bach Club features music for violin, viola, piano
by Mozart, Brahms in Greene Lounge, E. Quad at 8.
DRAMA-PTP presents The Open Theatre "Nightwalk" at 8
in Trueblood; Soph Show opens-at Power at 8 with Leon-
ard Bernstein's "Wonderful Town."
POETRY-Ext. Service, English Dept. features Carolyn Kizer
reading poetry in Aud. 4, MLB at 4:10.

Superstar

Hig h

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
in ter:
gyh aze
ad black Plavin' That Ro.k and Roll'" nd
atching plat- "Tobacco Road" domina*ied the
set.

Poge Five

enei
satin tunic, orange
striped pants and m<
form boots.

rum Lessons
Private Instruction
BEGINNERS WELCOME
FOR ENROLLMENT CALL:
769-4980
ANN ARBOR
MUSIC MART
336 S. STATE

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
CARL STERNHEIM'S PRESENTS
THE STRONGSBOX
Wed., Nov. 7-Sat., Nov. 10
800 P.M--Mendelssohn Theatre
Mendelssohn Box Office Opens Mon., Nov. 5th
Hours: Mon. and Tues., 12:30 p~m.-5 p.m.; Wed.-Sat, 12:30-8 p.m.
Advance info.: 764-6300 Box Office phone: 763-1085

, ...

I

By LORIN LABARDEE
The crowd drifted out of EMU
Bowen Field House Tues. night
in a high energy haze as a
roadie packed away Edgar Win-
ter's red sparkle tennis shoes.

TV
Iii~#"'ts
8 4 Flip Wilson - Robert Goulet,
Carol Lawrence, Slappy White
and the Dancing Flipettes.
9 2 Movie - Steve McQueen as a
tough detective in "Bullitt."
10 4 NBC Follies - Slapstick with
Sammy Davis Jr.; Jim Nabors,
Richard Crenna and Sandy
Duncan.

9' To See Ourselves - "Inheri-
tance," a contemporary drama
about an elderly tramp that is
disappointed when he goes to
the city in searchi of the good
life.
11:45 2 Movie - John Wayne stars in
"Dark Command," vigorous
historical tale of Kansas dur-
ing Civil War.
12 9 Movie - "The. Mountain"
stars Spencer Tracy. Two bro-
thers try to rescue a plane
stranded in Swiss Alps.
1:45 2 Movie - Michael Parks in
"Then Came Bronson," motor-
cycle odyssey of charming lon-
er and his encounter with a
runaway bride.

Concerts as joyous
way of remembering

By KURT JOHN HARJU
Folksinger Ed Trickett, nation-
ally known performer and re-
cording artist as well as a mem-
ber of the group "The Golden
Ring", will present the first
Peter Mattis Memorial Concert
this Sunday night at 9 at tie
Ark.
This concert will primarily be
a means of raising additional
money for a Memorial Fund set
up to commemorate the late
Dr. Peter Mattis, U faculty mem-
ber who was a frequent patron
of the Ark and folk music up un-
til his death by heart attack
last January. The fund will pro-
vide some money to the Ark
each year to help sponsor one
or more concerts by lesser
known traditional folk musicas i
in what Peter's friends, famly
and members of the community
hope will be a particularly joy-
Union
with i
By BILL IRVINE
Art is more than painting and
sculpture, yet few people go to
an art gallery expecting to find
anything else. For this reason,
gallery-goers may find them-
selves surprised by a trip to the
Union Gallery, located on the
main floor of the Michigan Un-
ion.
Sherryl Shaw, the Gallery's di-
rector, believes that art gal-
leries should be used for more
than a display of traditional art
objects. Thus, the Union Gal-
lery has in the past been the
scene of not oly the usual show
of painting and sculpture, b u t
also of recitals of chamber and
folk music.
The Gallery is also involved in
theater. Last spring it produced
"The American Dream", ;nJ at
the end of November it plans t
produce lonesco's "The Bald So-
prano".
Director Shaw emphasizes,
however, that these extracurri-
cular activities of the Gallery are
meant as a supplement to its on-
going art shows, and not as a
replacement for them.
In its shows, the Gallery usual-
ly displays the work of relative-
ly unknown artists. The Union
Gallery has become a particular
friend to artists who, because
they are not well-known, cannot
display their work at the com-
mercial galleries downtown and
elsewhere.
People! Music! Food!
BACH CLUB
presents
STRINGS' SUPER SIBS
Terri FELDMAN, viola
Clark FELDMAN, violin
with
Ellen BENSON, piano
performing
BRAHMS: Sonata in E flat
for viola and piano
MOZART: Symphonie
Concertante
for violin, viola, and piano

ful way of remembering and
celebrating him.
The board that has been f)rm-
ed to manage the fund is cur-
rently seeking suggestions -s to
whom and what kind of perforn-
ers to sponsor for these con.crts.
Because the Ark can only afford
to bring in people who will at-
tract large turnouts, an empha-
sis is being placed on selecting
performers and music that ordin-
arily are not accessible to Ani
Arbor audiences such as more
traditional ethnic, and possibly
Appalachain folk music.
Those who would like to make
suggestions, or contribute to the
fund, or have any questions can
call Helen Cook at 763-0264, or
send checks payable to the Pet-
er Mattis Memorial Fund in the
mail to her at L-414, West Quad,
University of Michigan in Ann
Arbor.

AuB~, t11(1t1is srE7Vle'C 11111
Last night's Musical Society sponsored Music from Iran, performing in
deserved applause.

Gallery surprises goers
ts display of versatility

The Gallery puts on both jur-
ied and special art shows.
In juried shows, the art d>s-
played is that which has been
selected by a jury from the works
brought in by local artists. In
the past year, 150 artists have
had their work displayed in jur-
ied sho'ws. For many of these
artists, it was the first time their
work had been displayed in a
gallery.
Special shows feature the work
of a single artist or group. Water
colors by Donald Davidson are
the subject of the currenm spec-
ial show. Later this year, t h e
works of artists in the Residen-
tial College will be highlghted
in a special show.
This past SeptembI, the Union
Gallery celebrated its first an-
niversary. There is some uncer-
tainty, however, whether it will
survive long enough to celebrate

its second.
The Gallery - like so many
organizations these days - is
having financial diffiPulties. In
the past, UAC has g-nerously
funded the Gallery. Re;eitly,
however, UAC has been having
its own financial diffioulties ai'd
has had to cut bacx its fiunding
of the Gallery. As a result, the
Gallery is $6,000 shoat of the
amount it needs to remain open
after next January.
In an attempt to rais money,
Shaw has instituted a member-
ship drive. For $5 students can
become members of the Gallery,
and for $10 non-students can be-
come members.
So far the membership drive
looks promising. There is also a
chance that new sources (f funds
will be found which w:ii guar-
antee the Gallery's operation
through its second year and b-

yond.
Shaw is careful to emphasize,
however, that if the community
fails to show its suppo-t far the
Union Gallery, there is a very
real chance that Cie Gallery will
have to close its doors this next
winter. If this were to happen,
Shaw adds, the ar'ists and people
of the community would lose a
valuable cultural resource.
rtitw ritin etr
If you are interest-
ed in revie% nq
poetry, and music
orwitin fatur
stories a b o u t the
drama. dance, film.
arts: Contact Artf
Editor, c/~r Tie
MichiganDiy

"Don Siegel has
raised the .crime thriller
to o newhigh . . tops
his own 'Dirty Harry,
it is one of the
a l lti me greats!"
-London Sunday Mirror
"AN ATTENTION
GRABBER!
Taut, action-packed! HAiTI
Walter Matthau is a
natu rot as e
-Ann Guarino, Daily News
"FAST MOVING
ACTION
THRILLER !"
-. Drew, Gannett

_.
,

Te OnlSow
11 l
7 hLf

n Town Is .. .

"I HAD
A TERRIFIC TIME!
-Shalit, WNBC-

TV THELASTOFTHEINDEPENDENTS y
G JOIEDONBAKERFLCIAFARR ANOYROBINSON You
SHEREE NORTH a JOHN VERNON u o

4 I

TA

IIV

II

N li Its

I

- r

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan