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October 31, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-31

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Wednesday, October 31, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Quadrophenia

'I

tells

howi
By TOM KIPPERT
Two and a half years is a long
time to wait for a studio album
by the Who.
Their latest effort as a group,
though, is well worth the delay.
Quadrophenia (MCA-Track 2-
10004) displays the best and most
durable elements that rock has to
offer.
This two-record set, confusing
at first, levels the listener with
its interior consistency and mu-
sical brilliance. Getting past the
euphemisms, Pete Townshend's
tunes on Quadrophenia delve in-
to the far reaches of "head"
rock and the emotional strands of
pure, driving rock 'n roll a la
Who.
Thematically, the Tommy era

t

Who comes

of the Who is recalled. The new
work is an opera, no matter
how loosely that term is defined.
The recuring riffs and chords, the
numerous references to character
traits, and all of the elements of
rock opera are present here.
The principal plot of Quadro-
phenia concerns a young mod
named Jimmy. Pressure, perver-
sity and resistance to conformity
fuse to drive him toward an ex-
tremely confused mental and
emotional state. "Schizophrenic?
I'm Bleeding Quadrophenic," or
so Jimmy says.
Musically, the moods cleanly
surface. Townshend gets full po-
tential out of the ARP synthe-
sizer. His guitar playing spans
different Who eras, resembling

powerful work in the Who's "My
Generation" days. His acoustic
work remains emotional and ex-
citing.
As a bassist, John Entwistle has
always been strong but more
importantly adaptable. His bass
picking (for example--"The Real
Me") proves that his worth to
the Who is ever-present.
Madman Keith Moon pounds
away again. His choppy but ma-
jestic drumming is one of the
four key elements to the Who's
sensual attack.
Roger Daltrey has improved
greatly as a rock vocalist. Quad-
rophenia shows us Daltrey at his
most durable. He is stylistically
tender on songs like "Love

why,
f'irst
Reigis O'er Me" and rocking on
tunes like "5:15.'
The package in which Quadro-
phenia takes form resembles
Tommy immensely. Colorwise it
seeps into the greys and whites
of confusion. The front cover
p h o t o g r a p h is spine-chilling,
though. The four faces of the
Sheppard's Bush (a London
suburb) boys are reflected in the
four mirrors of jarring Jimmy's
CS motorcycle. This in itself is
a step right into the past (or out
of it).
Quadrophenia is the Who at
their best. The album not only
takes the Who higher in rock
artistry, but additionally helps
rock into the forefront of cultural
and musical importance.

Aa the ovi-e: at BRIARWOOD
Adjacent to J.C. Penney 0 769-87E0 i1-94 & S. State, Ann Arbor
STUDENT DISCOUNT DAILY FROM 1:30 (except Fri. and Sat.
eve.) 75c OFF ADULT ADMISSION, School I.D. Reqd.
MOVIE
1 GEORGE SEGAL GLENDA JACKSON
TOUCH OF CLASS
MOVIE 2 -(PG)
HELD OVER 2ND WEEK
"BWILLY JACK"
DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY
Wed.-Thur.-Fri. at 4:55, 7 & 9:05
Sat. at 10:30, 12:40, 2:50, 4:55, 7 & 9:05
Sunday at 12:40, 2:50, 4:55, 7 & 9:05
MOVIE 3 (P.G.)
SWOM APirTURS ITEWTkNALrt
S
Based on the Tony Award
W~4nnir *Broadweay P14y TWENTIETH CENTURY-PX
P lomr ctures Internationalps
eKid
® An Elaine May Film PNBY[LR

ha'hut c'1 We sa
Performers rehearse for the Soph Show '73 presentation "Wonder-
ful Town" which is scheduled for November 1, 2 and 3 in the
Power Center.
C&U11TURE 11 1AE I WDA k
FILM-Cinema Guild presents Whale's The Invisible Man in
Arch Aud. at 7, 9:05 tonight. Ann Arbor Film Co-op pre-
sents The Undertaker and His Pals and The Corpse
Grinders in Aud. A, Angell at 6, 7:20 and 9 tonight. New
World Film Co-op presents WR-Mysteries of the Organ-
ism in Aud. 3, MLB, at 7:30 and 9:45 tonight. Cook Me-
morial Festival is showing Hitchcock's Frenzy in Rm. 100
Hutchings Hall at 7, 9 and 11 tonight.
MUSIC-Musical Society presents Music from Iran in Rack-
ham Aud. at 8:30 tonight.
'Scattered Arts' to
feature under grads

Little-known ethnomusicology
program opens cultural worlds

THE ORIGINAL

(PO)

MOVIE
4
(PG)

By MARK J. MITCHELL
Tucked-away among the mo-
notonous copy of the LSA cata-
log, squeezed into the squint-
inducing print of the time sched-
ule . . . here lies the Music
School's often overlooked enthno-
musicology program.
Discover the music of Ireland,

."Euro-American Folk and Popu-
lar Music" (Music 460) are
taught by Prof. Judith Becker
and Prof. William Malm, respec-
tively.
Winter term, Becker will in-
struct in "The Music /of Asia"
(Music 461) and Malm will teach
"Japanese Music" (Music (462),

, ~-'.-~

ARTS

_;. .. 4 . ._

By CHIP SINCLAIR
Disjoint poetry. Avant garde
jazz. Radio drama. Collaged on
tape, they become the material
for WCBN's new radio program,
"Scattered Arts."
The name "Scattered Arts,"
producer Dave Schmidt explains,
comes from the different kinds of
arts he wants to feature and the
different ways those arts might
be combined within a single
program.
One week, for example, the
show featured an avant garde
poetry reading with a jazz group
playing in the background. Part
of the show was devoted to the
guest's work and part to the
guest explaining his work.
Dave says that the show is
open to any art that is suitable
for the radio: poetry, music,
radio drama or stories.
"I would like this program to
be an informal showcase for
original undergraduate material.
Graduates get enough exposure,"
Schmidt says, "undergraduates
get shortchanged."
Dave thinks his show will help
people in the community find
out what various artists are do-
ing and perhaps to understand
them a bit more.
"People are not really sure
they understand contemporary
art," he says, "If the guest talks
about his or her work; the lis-
teners are reenforced in their
understanding of the material."
WATE
DIAL 662-6264
231 S. STATE ST.
ENDS TODAY!
"Jesus Christ, Superstar"
(G) At 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
-STARTS TOMORROW-
"AN ATTENTION GRABBER'
TAUT, ACTION-PACKED"
S- N.Y. Daily News
"TEEMS WITH TENSION,
PACE & HAIR STANDING
ACTION!".
-Shalit, NBC-TV
WHEN BE RUNS OUT OF
DUMB LUCK, HE ALWAYS HAS
GENIUS TO FALL BACK ON!

Dave Schmidt, a junior con-
centrator in radio, TV and film,
has tried many of the types of
art that will be presented on the
show. Despite his familiarity
with the material, Dave says,
"I can't really make a judge-
ment on what to accept or reject.
It's hard to criticize contempor-
ary work; you can feel it, but
you can't make value judge-
ments.
Dave says, "My criterion for
choosing a piece to go on the
show is how proud the artist is
of it. If the artist is really proud
of the piece. I'll use it.'
Dave adds that selection has
not as yet been a very pressing
problem since he has only aired
two shows
Broadcast at 5:30-6:00 on Satur-
day evenings, the show is taped
during the week.
"I prefer taping the show,"
Dave says. "It allows me to-
control how the show comes out.
I don't ever cut the guest off,
but through splicing the artist's
work with the commentary, I
can create a tension and unity
which might not be present in
a live show."

Africa, and the South Seas. And
would you believe that you can
learn about "Pop and Ann Arbor
Aboriginal?"
Although the field is basically
a graduate program, there are
four undergraduate courses of-
fered. This term, "Music Cul-
tures of the Southern Hemisphere
and Oceania" (Music 459) and
TV
highlights
9 9 NHL Hockey: The Pittsburgh
Penguins take on the Cana-
dians in Montreal.
5 Special: "When Witches Ho-
vered Near". Ghosts and gob-
lins arise to celebrate the
holiday season.
8:307Movie: yGuess Who's Sleep-
Ing in My Bed". This farcial
look at marriage stars Dean
Jones.
11:30 2 :Movie: "Who Slew Auntie
Roo" (English, 1972). Shelly
Winters pulls out all the
stops.
7 Dick Cavett. Guests include
former Teamsters president
James Hoffa.
50 Movie: "They Drive By
Night" (1940). Hard-hitting
tale of the trucking busi-
ness.
12:0() 9 Movie: "Torture Garden"
(English, 1968). An entertain-
ing quartet of horror stories.
1:25 2 Movie: "Picture Mommy
Dead" (1966). Contrived
thriller about a teen-age
heiress tortured by the past
and victimized by her step-
mother.

which is not sched''led on any
regular basis.
Becker defines ethnomusicol-
ogy as "The stidy of music in
telation to its social, cultural and
physical environment."
While sitting in on Becker's
class, one is immediately struck
by her enthusiasm as she claps
her hands in beat to the music
and sings along energetically.
A versatile person in her field,
her specialty is South East Asian
music. Originally a pianist, she
was once in Burma with ''no
piano around for 500 miles." "I
got interested in the music
around me," she explains.
Speaking on ethnomusicology,
she talks of the "magnificence
and diversification of musical ex-
pression around the world," in-
sisting tha, 'Part of a university
SH OP A T
FOALETTS
for books and supplies

education is to find out about
these things."
One student's description of
Malm as "a very dynamic pro-
fessor" is perhaps an under-
statement. In class, he speaks
(l'ickly, gesticulates fluidly and
often randomly switches from an
Irish to a Scottish to a German
to an indiscernable accent.
He is, t;o:'gh, a firm believer
in the st' lent as an adult and
gears his course towards intel-
le:t al growth.
Malm's specialty is Japanese
n-sic. Il' was origmi:ally educat-
ed in composition, but became
intrigued by oriental music when
"This stuff didn't make sense to
Both Malm and Becker strong-
ly believe in ethnom'isicology as
an interdis:iplinary approach to
n'sic. Te fi -ds of sociology,
iosy iol gy, linguistics and an-
A FUN COMEDY ABOUT
A MASTER PICKPOCKET!
JAMES COBURN
Assisted by
MICHAEL SARRAZIN and
TRISH VAN DEVERE in
e4.
z y
Open 1245
Shows at 1-3-5-7-4

thropoi gy are but a few of the
related disciplines.
Malm describes ethnomusicol-
ogy as "an emphasis within a
particular discipline," stressing
cooperation of the various de-
partments within the University.
Becker summerizes the issue as
"It's hard to imagine some dis-
cipline that doesn't contribute to
ours.'
For the times and course de-
scriptions, wade once again
through the LSA catalog, squint
really hard and pick up the time
schedul┬░.
&11 $2.00.

-
NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP presents
dProduced by
WR- MYSTERIES
OF THE ORGANISM®
Brilliantly original
With gleeful
irreverance. -NEWSWEEK
Satanically funny.
- TIME MAGAZINE
A picture of
blazing originality.
Must be seen -N.YPOST
Wed. & Thui7s. Mod. Long. Aud. 3
Oct 31,Nov. 1 730&9:45 p.m.
VALNESSA 'R ED"GRAVE in
rs
Chekhovs S THE SEAGULL
with James Mason and Simone Signoret
FIVE AWARDS FOR TEN BEST
director SIDNEY LUMET
Thursday Only Mod. Long. Aud. 4
Nov. 1 7.15 & 9:45 p.m.
SEAGULL may be seen us a DOUBLE FEATURE with WR on
THUR. at 7:15 or 9:30 p.m. at usual 50c discount.

I

6J'-DAYSTAR presents
on the lost day of classes:

THE ACTION EPIC HITS
OF THE 50's
ARE NOW THE "CAMP" HITS
OF THE 70's

I

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1973

I

CRISLER ARENA

8:00 p.mn.

HALLOWEEN SPECIAL
THE INVISIBLE MAN
From the H. G. WELLS classic-A tale of a scientist (Claude RAINS) who
discovers the secrets of invisibility while experimenting with Indian drugs
and then seeks to dominate the world as we know it.

$6.50, $6.00, $4.50 (rear stage!
all seats reserved
AVAILABLE ONLY BY MAID ORDER
BEGINNING WITH SAT., NOV. 3rd POSTMARKS

I

I 'U V ~ ~ U

1Ia

r ,.

0

Iu - minUr mu. -

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