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October 27, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-27

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d
Soturdcay, October 27, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Special prosecutor to

be

(Continued from Page 1)
become towards the end that many
reporters thought the President
walked out without waiting for the
traditional "thank you" from the
senior correspondent.
THE PRESIDENT unexpectedly
launched into his harsh and un-
fettered criticism of commentators
in response to a question on what
went through his mind when he
heard people demand his impeach-
ment. It was as if the President
had decided the time had come to
cut whatever superficial bonds of
friendship he might have had with
press personalities and to make
the break complete.
Nixon at first appeared to bej
taken aback by the question but
then hit back hard saying he felt
the same as he had when he or-
dered the invasion of Cambodia
in 1970 and the bombing of Hanoi
last Christmas and people said he
was a tyrant, a dictator-ne badE
lost his mind, and should resign
or be impeached.
"But I could stick it out," he
said defiantly.

such outrageous, vicious, distorted
reports," and terming much of
the network commentary of recent
days "hysterical."
CBS reporter Robert PierpG it
asked Nixon why he was so ingry
with reporters when he claimed
he could take their heat.
With a note of contempt, the
President replied: "Don't get the
impression that you have aroused
my anger. One can only be angry,
with those he respects."
LATER HE broke off in the mid-
dle of an answer to suddenly
turn to Plerpont-wliom he called
"my good friend from CBS' -to
say he didn't want to leave the
impression he didn't respect re-
porters.
"What I am saying is simply
this-when a commentator takes'
a bit of news and distort3 and
uses it viciously, I have no respect
for that individual."
The President also had a bitter
exchange with Clark Mollenhoff-
a former White House consultant
who is now an investigative re-'
porter and a bitter Nixon critic.
Nixon studiously ignored Mollen-

1

"You're so loud I have to take
you." Mollenhoff shot back, "I
have to be noisy because you hap-
pen to dodge my questions all the
time."
THE MEETING with newsmen
was Nixon's first news conference
since Vice President Spiro Agnew
resigned, the Middle East war
erupted, Cox was fired, Attorney
General Elliot Richardson resigned,
and the clamor for the President's
impeachment grew in Congress.
Nixon promised his new prose-
cutor "will have a permanent re-
sponsibiilty to bring this matter
which has so long concerneJ the
American people, to bring it to an
expeditious conclusion."
A reporter recalled Bork's state-
ment that he would have taken
Nixon to court, if necessary, to
obtain any further tape recordings
or documents needed for the
Watergate prosecution.
Bork hinted he might resign if
the federal prosecutor's efforts
are impeded.
But Nixon, referring to Cox's
successor to be appointed by Bork
next week, said: "I don't antici-
pate we would come to the time
when he would feel it necensary
to take the President to court."
NIXON'S PLAN to name a new

named
special prosecutor was broadly de-
nounced last night by Democrtic
Congressmen, who charged there
is no assurance the prosecwtor
would have a free hand.
"The people need to be assured
that he (Nixon) will not use his
powers toblock the truth," Sen.
Edmund Muskie (D-Maine) said.
"He did not give us that assur-
ance last tonight."
Sen. Birch Bayh (D-Ind.), chief
sponsor of a resolution co-spon-
sored by 52 Senators to establish
an independent special prosecutor
appointed by the courts, called
Nixon's plan "unbelievable."
"This new prosecutor has no
charter of independence at all,"
Bayh said. "All he has is the
President's word."
In his news conference last
night, Nixon also defended his
friend Charles "Bebe" Rebozo -
under investigation for numerous
financial acts - as "a totally hon-
est man."
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

(Continued from Page I
tient must be interviewed by the
doctor to make sure he is awaretof
the permanence of his decision. He
gets liter: tore on every aspect of
the operation.
DOCTORS will discourage young
men in their teens or twenties from
having the operation, or just refuse
to perform it. "I'm not sure that
a man who is of age should be re-
fused a vasectomy, Kose said. "But
young men must be educated in
other forms of birth control, and
they should have the rightdto con-
trol of their bodies," hie added.
One man who recently had a
vasectomy managed to defycthe
usual sanctions applied to child-
less couples. The man, a grad stu-
dent, explained his case.
"This is my second marriage.
I've already had kids, and I was
the oldest of eight children, so I
know what raising kids is like, he
said. And my fiancee and I decid-
ed we didn't want to have any. We
went down to the clinic and con-
vinced the doctor that we were
sincere. If you get turned down,
you can always go back and ar-

ge. "
"It was painful for about two
weeks afterward, and I felt like I
was recuperating from a mild ill-
ness. But my sex life is unimpair-
ed. In fact, my wife and I had
been using condoms, and she found
the sensation to be far more satis-
fying. I'd say the operation was a
bargain," the patient said.
THE USUAL patient at the clinic,
however, is what Kose called,
"Middle -- middle age, middle in-
come, and middle-sized family."
Most of the patients come from
the Detroit metropolitan area, and
the Ann Arbor region. The over-
age patient is around 35 years old,
but Kose feels that this is falling.
"The number was pushed up a
little by the number of older men
who had been waiting to have a va-
sectomy," he said. Operations have
been performed on men as old as
64 and as young as 20.
The average patient has had
three children, is married, and has
a job. Only a small percentage
are students, childless, or unem-
ployed, Kose added.

Business booming

LUIS BUNUEL'S
Diary of a Chambermaid
This modern French master uses the anarchist
classic of octave mirreau to launch yet another
attack on Bourgeois. "Rife with old - fashioned
quirks and persions."-Eugene Archer. It s t a r s
Jeanne Moreau and Michel Piccoli.
SHORT: KRAZY KAT REEL 2
SUN.: BUNUEL'S L'AGE D'OR
MON.: BERGMAN'S THE SEVENTH SEAL
CINEMA GUILD ARCHITECTURE AUD.
Tonight atnd95 Adm. $
7land 9:05 Am$

TON IGHT
Last Night
for

THE PRESIDENT launched what hoff's attempts to be recognized
was considered by many a thinly until the reporter finally stood up
veiled attack on the Columbia and shouted "Mr. President, Mr.
Broadcasting Service (CBS) say- President."
ing, "I have never seen or heard Nixon recognized him saying,

Israelis claim victory in Suez

(Coutinued from Page1)
The United States rejected the
Egyptian request after President
Anwar Sadat made it last Wednes-i
day.
SINCE the Soviet Union appar-
ently is sending only a group of
truce observers, it appears Sadat's,
request also was rejected by the
Kremlin.
Brezhnev's announcement came1
in a long speech in which he ac-.
cused Israel of "adventurism"
and violations of the cease-fire.
But in speaking about world af-
fairs in general, he said the dang-t
er of nuclear war has eased and
that the chances for world peacet
are better.
WHILE BREZHNEV did not fur-
ther describe the "representa-
tives," diplomats in the Soviet cap-1
ital with close Kremlin connections
said they understood that about 1004
men in civilian clothes were dis-
patched to Egypt and that their
mission was to observe. None was
sent to the Syrian sector, which iss
calm, the informants added.
McCloskey said the Soviet "rep-
resentatives" were not combat per-t
sonnel and their dispatch to thel
Middle East does not represent the,
kind of unilateral action that Sec-
retary: of State Henry Kissinger
deplored on Thursday, when the
United States put key military'
bases around the world on precau-
tionary alert.
McCloskey stressed that the
United States and the Soviet Union
are barred from assigning troops
to an international peacekeeping"
force that was established through
a U. N. Security Council resolu-
tion on Thursday.
DEFENSE SECRETARY James
Schlesinger ordered the phasing
down of the U.S. military alert but
kept most units at the ready.
"We do not know at this stage
whether the Soviets have reduced
their alert status," Schlesinger
told a news conference in Wash-
ington.
"We are carefully watching their
status . . . We will begin to make
selective reductions of our readi-
ness as conditions warrant."
SCHLESINGER SAID President
Nixon ordered the American alert
after receiving information that
about 50,000 Soviet paratroopers
were placed on alert status last
week in Eastern Europe. He said
another reason was that the size of
A little calculator
will get you t h r o u g h
times of a lot of figuring
better than a lot of figur-
ing will get you through
times of little calculators.
Come to U-CELLAR
AND SEE

the Soviet fleet in the Mediter-
ranean had doubled to an all-time
high of 85 'vessels. There also was
the possibility, Schlesinger added,
that some Soviet troops were actu-
ally en route by air to Cairo. from
Eastern Europe.
The State Department leveled
criticism of U.S. allies in Europe
for having "separated themselves
publicly from us" during the past
few days of tension over the Mid-
dle East.
The fighting in the Middle East
centered on the southern sector of
the Suez Canal. The Israeli mili-
tary command said the trapped
Egyptian 3rd Army had mounted a
tank and artillery attack in hopes
of breaking out. But the command
said the assault was turned back.
THE CEASE-FIRE appeared to
have taken hold on other fronts.
The Israeli state radio said the
estimated 20,000-man Egyptian 3rd
Army is surrounded and running
out of food and water north of the
port of Suez at the southern end
of the 103-mile Suez Canal.
The Israeli command said the
Egyptians were trying to transfer
the trapped troops across the canal
back into Egypt proper from the

Sinai Desert, which has been in
Israeli hands since 1967. The mili-
tary command in Tel Aviv held
that this was a violation of the
cease-fire that first went into effect
Monday and reinforced by another
U.N. Security Council resolution on
Tuesday.
"THE SITUATION of the 3rd
Army is desperate," one Israeli,
battle correspondent said in a
broadcast.
An Israeli helicopter carrying
blood plasma for the surrounded
Egyptians left Tel Aviv early in
the day for delivery to the Inter-
national Red Cross on the scene.
In Tel Aviv, Israeli officials said
a Liberian-registered tanker, be-
lieved to be heading for Israeli
occupied oil fields in the Sinai
peninsula hit an Egyptian mine and
was in danger of sinking at the
mouth of the Gulf of Suez, about'
175 miles south of Suez city.

saturday, October 27
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM - Football: Michigan vs
Minnesota. WUOM-FM (91.7 Mhz), live
broadcast. 1:15 pm.
P.T.P.: Feydea"'s "Chemin de Fer"
Mendelssohn Theatre, 3 p.m.
University Players: Durrenmatt's
"'The Marriage of Mr. Mississippi"
Arena Theatre. Frieze Bldg.. 8 p.m.
Musical Society: Kipnis Mime Thea-
ter, Power. 8 p.m.
Music School: Contemporary Music
Festival. Jan De Gaetani, guest artist.
David Robbins, conductor, Rackhanm
Aud.. 8 p.m
P.TsP.: Rurrenniatt's "The Visit"
Mendelsohn Theatre. 8 p.m.
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
3200 SAB, 764-7456
Recruiting on Campus: Oct. 30: Cor-
nell Sch, of Bus. Pub. Ad.; Connecti-
cut Mutual Life Ins.; Univ. of Santa
Clara, Law; Oct. 31: Zayre Corp.; Cor-
nell Sch. Bus. & Pub. Adm.; Nov. 1;
Abraham & Straus. Nov. 2: Upjohn;
Sears Roebuck & Co.; Kurt Salmon;
Georgetown Univ, Law; Nov. 3: Manuf.
Nat'l. Bank; Univ. of Notre Dame;
Nov. 6: Stanford Univ Grad. Sch. Bus.;
North Western Univ., Law; Wayne
State Univ. Personnel Office; Pennsyl-
vania Univ., Law; Nov. 7: Mass, Inst.
of Tech. Sch. of Arch. & Planning;
Univ. of Chicago Grad. Sch's: Burger
King Corp; Nov. 8: Dunn & Brad-
street, Inc.; HEW Mgt. Intern Pro-
gram: George Washington Univ., Law;
Aetna Life & Casualty: Nov. 9: Colun-
bia Univ. Grad. Sch. of Bus.; Villanova,
Univ., Law; N. Y. Univ., Law; Univ.
of Penn. Wharton Grad. Div.; N. Y.
Life Ins. Co.

3.
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s
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z
C

OES

The Academy Award Winner You MUST See Again
NOW RATED

I

PLUS The picture you should NEVER
have missed!

I

LLISO

I

GEORGE SEGAL: The son in the ape suit!

Thur. & Fri. open 7 p.u-m.
"Poppa" at 7:30 only
"Cowboy" at 9 p.m. only
-Sot. & Sun. open 1 p.m.-
"Cowboy" at 1 :30-5:20-9:05'
"Poppa" at 3:45 & 7:25

1214I~ s:uiveam

I

A

49

A

Cam -==a '4r,

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS presents
A SHOWCASE PRODUCTION
THE MARRIAGE OF MR. MISSISSIPPI
by FRIEDRICH DURRENMATT
Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 25-27
Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg.-8:OO P.M.
TICKETS: $1.00 THURS.; ,1.50 FRI. AND SAT.
ON SALE AT TRUEBLOOD BOX OFFICE
OCT. 23-27---12 NOON-5 P.M.

OPEN DAILY AT 12:45
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
HELD OVER-3rd HIT WEEK
DON'T MISS IT!
Rated G
JESUS CHRIS
SUJPERSAR"

NEW WORLD FILM COOP presents
A HALLO WEEN DREAM
Alice In
W onderland
* This bizarre rendition of the
* 4
Lewis Carroll classic, patterned
after the Tenniel drawings,
. features such intriguing cast-
inq as Gar y Cooper as the
*a PIroducd b * White Knight, Cary Grant as
W*-MYSTERIES the Mock Turtle, Edward Ev-
OF THE ORGANISM@ erett Horton as the Mad Hat- .*
* ter, and Jack Ookie and Ros-
* Brilliantly original co- Krns as Tweedledum and
* with gleeful Tweedledee. W.C. Fields plays .
irroverance. -NF Humpty-Dumpty, dnd delivers
some s u p e r b in - character
* Satanically n"y- readings of the author's non-
^iMAI AZINE
A picture of sense verse.
* blazing originality.
Must be seen.
* WED. & THURS., Oct. 31, Nov. 1 TUES. only, Oct. 30
* *
* ALSO THURS.: Vanessa Redgrave in Chekov's THE SEAGULL
********l************ ************ ***************

2333 E. STADIUM BLVD.
(near Washfenaw) Ann Arbor
AMPE FREE PARKING
Call 663-9165 for information

beneath Frontier's Restaurant
AAMusical Oasis -

- TONIGHT -
Woody Allen X.2

. .

NOW SHOWING! Fri., 7, 8:45, 10:30; Sat. 7:15, 9
"Totally delightful There is much nudity and simu-
lated sex in this film, but if your wife, or husband
has never seen an X-rated movie, 'Le Sex Shop' is
the one to take her, or him to. It is whoesome,
refreshing and deliciously funny satire."
Stewart Klein, WNEW-TV
"This charming French comedy is the first really
sophisticated X-rated movie shown, and proves that
sex is not just fun but that it also can be very
funny."
Kevin Sanders, WABCTV

I

9 1

A FUN COMEDY ABOUT
A MASTER PICKPOCKET!
JAMES COBURN
Assisted by
MICHAEL SARRAZIN and
TRISH VAN DEVERE in

r . /

o ..
>.:
l'

Michigan Men s
Glee Club
INFORMAL SONGFEST

"BRAVO
for his most sophisticated,
entertaining and delight-
fully satirical comedy about
changing sexual mores and
the efforts of couples to
keep pace.,
William Wolf, Cue Magazine
"LAUGHS
all over the place. 'Le Sex
Shop' is not for children
but is for adults who can
smile through a nude, but

woody alle's
ALOUISE LASSER - CHARLES HJOFFE - JACK GROSSBERG
-AND-
Everything You Always Wanted To

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