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October 26, 1973 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-26

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Friday, October 26, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

RUNNING GAME STRONG SUIT

Gophers

By MIKE LISULL
When Cal Stoll found out his
1973 Minnesota Gopher traveling
squad was going to be one-half
freshmen and sophomores, he
must have figured it was going
to be a long season.
But it's a hopeful season, too,
because before very long these
youngsters are going to, come
together and form a talented
team. After being bombed 5-7
by Ohio State in the opener,
they have gradually matured,
recording back-to-back victories
against Big Ten foes Indiana
(24-3) and Iowa (31-23). Obvious-
ly these victories over a par of
"weak sisters" do not mice Miii-
nesota a 'title contender; but
they are definitely improving.
Stoll is taking advantage of
the freshman rule this year and
has two frosh starting, with three
others on the second st:mg.
These players, along with the
Gopher sophomores, have been
key factors in Minnesota's recent
progress.
This year's edition of the once-
golden Gophers depends on a
strong running game. Fortun-
ately they are blessed with an
abundance of good running backs.
Sophomore Rick Upchurch was

daily
spori
NIGHT EDITOR
JEFF CHOWN
the starter for most of
son but after the Indian
which Stoll called U]
"best game ever," hev
gated to second team s
favor of frosh star Larr
Stoll must have know
thing because Powell is
up the turf at a rate of
a carry for a total of 3
Upchurch has accumu
yards and he garners4
per carry.
The mainstay of the
ground game is senior
John King. King, who
Big Ten last year, has
up 435 yards in 108 atte
an average of 4.0 yards
King always gets the c,
short yardage is neede
Rounding out the back
two young running quar

chasing
Sophomore John Lawing will get
the start, but frosh Tony Dungy
of nearby Jackson gets a lot of
playing time. Lawing has 243
yards in 56 carries, while Dungy
has 123 in 60. But their passing
can only be called suspect. Law-
ing has hit 15 of 32 passes but
has also thrown 5 interceptions.
Dungy is not as impressive with
8 for 31, but he has thrown for
more yardage.
the sea- The favorite receiver of the
na game, quarterbacks is tight end Keith
pchurch's Fahnhorst with a mere 6 grabs
was rela- for 34 yards. Split-end Dale
ervice in Henricksen has gathered 5 recep-
y Powell. tions for 50 yards.
vn some- The Minnesota offense wi l
grinding come out with a flanker, split
7.3 yards end and two running backs, but
01 yards. the ends are just for show. The
lated 310 only way Minnesota can win is
4.5 yards if they get that big ground game
in gear.
Gopher The Gopher defense is in much
fullback the same boat. Strong against
was All- the run but weak against the
chalked pass. Against Nebraska the de-
empts for fense yielded 250 yards in the
a carry. air which resulted in a 48-7 loss.
call when What Minnesota does have is
dd. a tough defensive line and line-
kfield are backers. Minnesota usually has
.terbacks. good linebackers; but this year~
the defensive strength has to be
their line.

Little

Brown Jug

The Rackham Student
Government is now
soliciting applications
for the graduate student
Positions on graduate
school& SGC committees
THESE COMMITTEES INCLUDE:
Program Evaluation
(1 GRAD STUDENT)
Dissertation & Independent
Research
(1 GRAD CANDIDATE STATUS)
Distinguished Service Awards
(1 GRAD STUDENT)
Training in Teaching
1 GRAD, TA OR FORMER TA)
SGC Election Rules
(1 GRAD STUDENT)
SGC Permanent Interviewer
Boa rd
1 GRAD STUDENT)
Positions will be g i v e n to those demonstrating
greatest interest, experience, or qualifications.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION--OCT. 31
Openings for other committees will be
regularly publicized
WE

I

t

Sorts- of The Dail1y
From Wire Service Reports
Baseball notes 3
Trades and the naming of the National League's Manager-
of-the-Year highlight the happenings in Major League Baseball.
Fiery Gene Mauch of the Montreal Expos outpolled Yogi Berra
of the pennant winning New York Mets, 121-94, for the Associated
Press' top pilot honors. Cincinnati's Sparky Anderson finished
third in the balloting with 77 votes with the remaining ballots
spread thinly among five other candidates:
Yesterday's big trade saw the Chicago Cubs send six time,
20-game winner Ferguson Jenkins to the Texas Rangers for
outfielder-secondbaseman Vic Harris and minor leaguer Bill
Madlock. San Diego got into the action by acquiring weak
kneed slugger Willie McCovey from the San Francisco Giants
for pitcher Mike Caldwell. Later the Padres purchased Matty
Alou and his large contract from the St. Louis Cardinals.
The final trade was a straight swap of righthanded pitchers
as the Boston Red Sox sent Marty Pattin to Kansas City for
Dick Drago.
J.V. football cancelled
The Michigan Varsity Reserve football game scheduled for
this Saturday has been cance'lled. The planned opposition, Mich-
igan State, couldn't make it.
Says V-R coach Dennis Brown of the situation, "We really
don't know why they cancelled. Maybe they had injuries or
something. This is not going to be good for our players, who
need the game experience."
An attempt is going to be made to reschedule the game. In
the interim, the V-R game with the Spartans scheduled for
Nov. 9 at East Lansing will instead be played in Ann Arbor.
Ruggers test Toronto
For those of you who are tired of following the pack to
Michigan Stadium each Saturday, for those who simply wish a
change of pace, try going down to Palmer Field this Saturday
and watch another Michigan team trying their best in inter-
collegiate competition. However, if you expect a less brutaliz-
ing, aggressive or less fascinating game than you are accus-
tomed to, the Michigan Rugby players will definitely disappoint
you.
The club is experiencing a rebuilding year due to a massive
turnover of players in which 11 regular starters from last year!
were lost. From Michigan's first two teams a season ago,
only eight ruggers have returned.
But the team has great confidence in the rash of new
talent that has turned out, including Angelo Toco, Howard Nel-
son and Ron Parson. Those attempting to develop this new club
are co-captains Walt Halloway, Cleland Child, Chuck Drukis,
and Larry Lucarelli.i
The backline is still questionable. Child, Mike Markman,
Toco, and Nelson being the only regulars.
The Michigan club will cntest Toronto Scarborough this
Saturday at 1:00 p.m.
Spikers down Kellogg
Michigan's women's volleyball team recovered from losses
earlier in the week to Calvin and Grand Valley State College
and spiked Kellogg Community College Wednesday night in'
Battle Creek. The varsity reserve continued its winning ways
as they bumped Kellogg C.C. after an earlier victory over
Calvin. They lost to Grand Valley, playing a woman short.
Michigan has a week lay-off before a re-match with Calvin
Nov. 3, at Eastern Michigan. Calvin has one of the state's
best teams, always finishing in the top three at the state tour-
nament. Michigan's rivalry with EMU is fierce, and this year
both schools field evenly matched teams.
Stickers trip Adrian
Michigan's women's field hockey team ran Adrian off the
Tartan turf yesterday afternoon, 3-0.
Michigan kept the action at Adrian's end of the field, and
at the start of the second half, right inner Gray Gilifillan scored$
unassisted after an aggressive Michigan rush.
Gilfillan had a fine day, scoring twice more as Michigan
worked the hand-stop corner to perfection. On that play, center-
halfback Sheryl Szady stops the hit in from the corner, setting
up a shot on goal for Gilfillan.
Michigan's defense, still hampered by injuries, managed to
hold Adrian to only three shots on goal. The defense was helped
by Michigan's aggressive offensive play, which kept play away
from Michigan's goal.
The entire Michigan squad executed well, and coach Phyllis
Weikart said she was delighted with her team's performance.
Michigan gets a chance to even its 1-2 record on Monday when
they meet the University of Windsor at 4 p.m. in the Stadium.
pa.nmimmi - -M"-M-PRESENT THIS COUPON --'"- m -- iMw.
* 1- BEEF-N-CHEDDAR
FRENCH FRY

Anchoring the lett side is senior
defensive end Steve Neils. One
of Neil's big admirers is his
coach. Stoll calls Neils "The
best defensive e id in the BSig
Ten." Neils is certainly deserv-
ing of the praise. He is third on
the team in tackles with 47 and
has forced many teams to direct
most of their plays on the other
side of the line. On the other
side of the line is their other
All-Big Ten candidate, defensive
tackle Keith Simons. Simons is
a 242-pound mass of tough foot-
ball player, who started every
game as a freshman. Another lo-
cal lad, Simons matriculated at
nearby Belleville High.
Backing up the line is Minne-
sota's usual complement of good
linebackers; all three started
started last year. The best of the
bunch is junior Ollie Bakken.
Bakken plays the weak side and
is the team leader in tackles
with 61. Mike Steidl, on the
strong side, is second on the
team with 56. Junior Paul Glan-
ton holds down the middle.
In the defensive backfield, all
is not well. Stoll has decided to
start a freshman at the tough
cornerback position, but it looks
like he has a good one. Orville
Gilmore, a high school quarter-
back from Chicago, intercepted
two passes last week and earned
his starting berth. Doug Beau-
doin is probably the best of the
rest, and has swiped three
enemy passes.
Up for grabs in Saturday's con-
test is the Little Brown Jug and
a chance to make the season for
Minnesota. With Ohio State the
only Big Ten loss, a win on Sat-
urday would put Minnesota right
in the Big Ten race. A loss for
Michigan would destroy their
chance of a No. 1 ranking.

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
MINNESOTA'S TOUGH FRONT seven on defense will have their hands full with the potent Michigan
rushing attack. Here Dennis Franklin (9), who gained 63 yards last week against Wisconsin, pulls
away from both the Wisconsin defense and his own men, Chuck Heater (44) and Gary Hainrihar (69).
Franklin, All-Big Ten as a sophomore, looks to be back in the groove after a week off due to a
broken finger.

COLORADO CHALLENGES MISSOURI

McKay wary of Irish

By ALBERT OSBORNE Kay, "you must make big plays.
The game between sixth ranked You cannot beat them by ball con-r
Southern California (5-0-1), and trol."
eighth ranked Notre Dame (5-0), The "big plays" for example in
has the makings of tomorrow's best last year's Southern Cal 45-23 vic-I
contest. 'tory included two kick off returnsI
The Southern California Trojan's for touchdowns by Anthony Davis.I
coach, John McKay, called the In McKay's estimate this yeart
event "the biggest collegiate in- Notre Dame is a better team. TheI
tersectional game of the year. It Fighting Irish are "bigger andt
always is. Since I've been coach- quicker. Even as big as we are,
ing here 14 years, eight or nine they're bigger. We can't try tof
times the team that's won this slug it out with them."
game could win the national cham- The Trojan defensive unit isj
pioShip-" minus three players. Junior tac-I

If Nebraska defeats Big Eight
rival Oklahoma State tomorrow,
Cornhusker coach Tom Osborne
believes his team will "go into the
stretch drive in pretty good shape.
I know a lot of people do not be-
lieve at this point that we can win
the Big Eight Championship. I be-
lieve we can. Our players believe
they can."
The skepticism about Nebras-
ka's ability to win the conference
title is based on the Cornhusker's
past two performances. A 13-12
loss to Missouri, and last week's
10-9 victory over Kansas.
This skepticism is ill founded.
As Gale Sayers now an assistant
advisor to the Kansas Jayhawks
puts it, "Nebraska and Oklahoma
are the two best teams in the con-
ference. I don't care about their
loss to Missouri, they are a fine
team with a great defense."

At stake is the prestige of a
higher position in the national
polls that a superior performance
would bring.
For USC, regardless of the out-
come, the game has no bearing
on what McKay calls their "pri-
mary goal", a Rose Bowl berth.
"We could beat Notre Dame and
move up to number three but
lose the next week to California
and not go to the Rose Bowl",
McKay said.
Since being defeated 51-0 in 1966
the Trojans have not lost to No-
tre Dame. "Beating Notre Dame
is always.one thing" explained Mc-

kle Glenn Byrd is out for the
year with an ankle injury. Line-
backer James Sims, also plagued
by an ankle injury, is out for
the game. After losing his start-
ing position two weeks ago, de-
fensive end Ed Powell quit the
team.

i

Gridde P ickings
THE_ NATION'S FOOTBALL fans will get a treat Sunday morning
as the eighth-ranked Daily Libels try to extend their unpre-
cedented 83 year win streak against the once mighty Datum Technics.!
The game will be at 11:30 at Wines Field.
A vote for the Technics means the best you can be in the
race for the Mr. Pizza pizza is 19-1.
S.. *

"Powell demanded to p 1 a y
more," commented McKay. "Play-
ers are not running this team, the
coaches are. We have no union for
players here. If Anthony Davis
came to me and said the same- -- -
thing, he'd be .off the team." NHL
Two of tomorrow's Big Eight ( Last Night's Results
Conference games command spe-' New York Islanders 1, Minnesota 1
Montreal 4, Philadelphia 0
cial attention. Missouri (6-0) plays Boston 9, Buffalo 4
Colorado (4-2). Colorado's only con-
ference loss was to Oklahoma 34-7
last week. Should Colorado win RELIABLE
they, along with Missouri and Ne-
braska would be tied for second
place. Undefeated Oklahoma would
l b alnein first place having yet Clinic in Mich.-1 to 24 week
be alone isi nd eraskgyt pregnancies terminated by li-
to face Missouri and Nebraska, censed obstetrician qynecolo-
ranked seventh and tenth respec- gist. Quick services will be or-
tively. ranged. Low rates.
- - -CALL COLLECT
BLACK & ORANGE (216) 281-6060
DAY 24 HOUR SERVICE

I

I

SENIOR PICTURE SALES

1. MICHIGAN at Minnesota (pick
score)
2. Northwestern at Ohio State
3. Michigan State at Purdue
4. Indiana at Wisconsin
5. Iowa at Illinois
6. Southern California at Notre
Dame
7. Missouri at Colorado
8. Southern Methodist at Texas
Tech
9. Utah at Arizona
10. Houston at Auburn
I~A--Y'S
ARMY
SURPLUS
1166 Broadway
(north of Broadway bridge)
769-9247
open: mon-fri: 10-7 sot: 9-6

11. Navy at Pittsburgh
12. Louisiana State at South Caro-
lina
13. Kentucky at Georgia
14. Dartmouth at Harvard
15. Temple at Delaware
16. Connecticut at Massachusetts
17. Kent State at Utah State
18. Grambling at Texas Southern
19. Slippery Rock at Indiana State
(Pa.)
20. Datum Technics at DAILY
LIBELS

Last Days on Diag

Photos Start Oct. 29

i

is coming
OCTOBER 31st
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE.
1216 S. University
663-9333

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Nov. 3
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Dec. 1
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12

* HEAD
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11

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