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October 25, 1973 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, October 25, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. Page Three

Nixon seeks emergency power
in face of Arab oil embargo

s

WASHINGTON (Reuter) -Pre-
sident Nixon is seeking emer-
gency powers to prevent a fuel
shortage in the face of an Arab
embargo of oil deliveries -here,
Sen. Henry Jackson said yescer-
day.
Jackson, a Washington Demo-
crat who strongly supports Israel,
told reporters that his powerful
Senate Interior Committee ex-
pected to complete action on a
bill prepared by the Nixon Ad-
ministration some time ni e x t
week.
THE PROPOSED legislation
would:
-Allow the president to d'e-
clare a shortage emergency
when the United States loses five
per cent or more of its supply.
Jackson said the delivery re-
strictions imposed by several
Arab states because of U.S. aid
to Israel threaten the loss of
10 per cent of U.S. daily needs;
-Grant the president unusual
authority to force the country
to produce substitute fuels equi-
valent to up to 3.3 million barrels
of oil a day;
- Increase U.S. domestic pro-
duction;
-Permit the exploitation of the
Naval oil reserve at Elk Hills,

California, where an estimated
1.1 billion barrels is in t h e
ground; and
-Allow the President to order
electric utilities to use coal in-
stead of oil or natural gas to
run their generators, even though
this would increase air pollution.
THE TWO BIGGEST Arab oil

suppliers to the United States,
Libya and Saudi Arabia, have
curtailed production and ship-
ments of oil to this country in re-
taliation for the Nixon admin-
istrations support for Israel.
In adition, pipelines through
Iraq have ceased functioning be-
cause of the Arab-Israeli fight-
ing.

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS presents
A SHOWCASE PRODUCTION
THE MARRIAGE OF MR. MISSISSIPPI
by FRIEDRICH DURRENMATT
Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 25-27
Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg.-8:00 P.M.
TICKETS: $1.00 THURS.; $1.50 FRI. AND SAT.
ON SALE AT TRUEBLOOD BOX OFFICE
OCT. 23-27-12 NOON-5 P.M.

11 die on N.J. road

,

I

Chemin De Fer Tonight !

I

KEARNEY, N.J. (om) - At least
11 persons were killed yesterday
as heavy fog and smoke engulfed
the New Jersey Turnpike, re-
ducing visibility to near zero
and causing scores of separate
accidents.
More than 40 other persons
were injured, and police feared
the death toll could go higher -
once the wreckage was cleared
in the areas of three major pile-
ups and dozens of minor acci-
dents.
STATE POLICE said at least

seven persons died in the larg-
est crash, involving 22 vehicles,
just north of the Kearny inter-
change in Rutherford, where the
roadway passes between New-
ark and New York.
Four other persons were killed
in two separate accidehts in the
Secaucus area, about two miles
northeast of here.
"We just can't say how many
are dead at this time," state po-
lice Sgt. Joseph Kobus said on
Wednesday afternoon.

iHENEWPHOENIX'
EPERTORYWCa MY
T. Edward Hambieton, Michael Montel Managing Directors .Hordd Prince. Stephen Porter Arisic Dedors

Surprise meetig
Fired Deputy Atty. Gen. William Ruckelshaus, left, turns to talk with assistant Atty. Gen. Henry
Petersen as acting Atty. Gen. Robert Bork works on some notes. Petersen and Bork walked into an
office in the Justice Dept. to see Ruckelshaus after he was interviewed.

I

OBJECTS SEEN COAST-TO-COAST:
Strange sightings give rise to
recent rash of UFO reports

Thurs., Oct. 25-8 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 26-8 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 27-3 p.m.
RACHEL JOHN
ROBERTS WMARTIN
b GEORGES FEYDEAU
adopted by
SUZANNEEadPAXTON
GROSSMANN WHITEHEAD
dirE Oted by
STEPHEN PORTER

Sat., Oct. 27-8 p.m.

Sun., Oct.
Sun., Oct.

28-3 p.m.
28-8 p.m.

By The Associated Press
The whatzits seemed to be
spreading yesterday.
From New York to the Mid-
west, there "wqe fresh reports
that unidentified flying objects-
UFOs - had been sighted in the
sky.
THERE WAS no proof that
any of the objects was really
from outer space.
The rash of recent UFO re-
ports started with the claim of
two Mississippi men who s a i d
they'd been taken aboard a
spacecraft from an alien society.
Tales of strange sightings pop-
ped up across the nation. Some
turned out to be pranksters; oth-
ers were natural phenomena like
stars or planets; a few remain-
ed unexplained.
AT LEAST one enterprising
young man is trying to cash in
on the latest fad. Bob O'Dell, a

21-year-old student at Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute in T r o y ,
N.Y., said yesterday he's in-
vented a UFO detector.
"You could put it under- your
bed, or wherever you feel safest,'
said O'Dell., "When the detector
buzzes, go look for the UFO."
O'Dell, an environmental en-
gineering student from Bethesda,
Md., said his gadget is design-
ed to pick up electromagnetc
waves he thinks a UFO gives off.
IT'S MADE from a battery, a
metal washer, a relay switch
and buzer. O'Dell admits he's
"just taking advantage of the
panic right now. I figured I could
pick up some cash.".
O'Dell might find a market
close to home.
Four Troy residents said they
saw a strange, greenish, buzzaig
object late Tuesday night.

"IT WAS GREENISH and mov-
ed fast and when it stopped it
became white," said Francis
Sousin. "We watched it in front
of our home and the UFO made
a buzzing noise and sent cold
chills throughout our bodies."
Dallas, Tex., police actually
chased a UFO = only to find out
they'd been trying to catch a
planet.
POLICE IN Portage, Wis., got
three phone calls about UFOs
Tuesday night. Twice the object
turned out to be the planet Mars.
Authorities spent a little more
time on the third report since it

came from a 22-year-old woman
who police said was an aircrafz
observer trained by the Civil
Air Patrol. Kathy Rapa s a i d
she saw red, white and green
lights blinking in the sky at 7:40
p.m.
But the Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration said even trained
observers can be foed. A
spokesman at the FAA control
tower at Madison, Wis., said at-
mospheric conditions -can make
the planets Mars and Venus
seem to blink - even when view-
ed through binoculars.

RACHEL JOHN
ROBERTS McMARTIN
by
FRIEDRICH DUERRENMATT
adapted by
MAURICE VALENCY
dHrcted byRN
HAROLD PRINCE

:::U>oo> <;;;;>ot). )_-onococa:) t><
ARTISTS
0~0
SUBMIT YOUR WORK
TO THE
UNION GALLERY
JURY
by Oct. 31
for November showing
1st floor Michigan UnionQ
GALLERY HOURS: Tues.-Sat. 10-5
C ->b G<- > {<- >'<->{<->0<=->}<-0<- 0 < >}-OO

Eastern Michigan University
HOMECOMING WEEKEND
EMU and WWWW Present
ARLO GUTHRIE
OCT. 27-8:00 P.M.
BOWEN FIELDHOUSE
TICKETS: $2.50, $3.50, $4.50
AVAILABLE AT: Ann Arbor 'Music Mart, J.L Hdson's,
Huckleberry Party Store, McKenny Union
CHICAGO
SOLD OUT ____

ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY Wed.,.Nov. 14-8:30 p.m. _
at the POWER CENTER $2.50-all seats reserved * MENDELSSOHNTHEATRE:ANN ARBOR
Advance Tickets: MICHIGAN UNION M-F 11-5:30; also, at 7
Discount Records on S.U. and in YPSI at NED'S Bookstore.
sorry, no checks UAC-DAYSTAR
Nor

Tickets on sale at PTP Box Office
Mendelssohn Lobby, Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
For further information
call 764-0450

Ann Arbor's Festival Chorus
joins with
The Legingrad Philharmonic

18th Century Revisited

On Sunday afternoon, November 4, Prokofieff's heroic cantata,
"Alexander Nevsky," will be performed by the Leningrad Philharmonic
and sung in Russian by the 100-voice Festival Chorus of the
University Choral Union. Joy Davidson, brilliant young American
mezzo-sporano, is the soloist, and Neeme Jarvi, known for his
powerful interpretations and penetrating insights, is the conductor.
After intermission, concert-goers will hear Rachmaninoff's
Symphony No. 3, commemorating the 100th anniversary
of the composer's birth.
Performance in Hill Auditorium, November 4, at 2:30; tickets
available from $3.50 to $8.50.

Since 1968, THE BAROQUE ENSEMBLE USSR has concertized
throughout Russia and Eastern and Western Europe, now comes
to North America. Their debut this weekend includes French,

i

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