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September 06, 1973 - Image 54

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I
Th'u rsdav.

Antombor 6: 1 C)7

Page Four TH~ MICHIGAN DAILY

I I j t a%%Ayf )ap r- I luuI u It 7f

:7

W HAT'S A
STEAKC

TV
By ERIC SCHOCH
Supplement Co-editor
The University Television
ter. Just the word telev

Cen-
'ision

themselves are made on broad- sisl
cast 2-inch video tape, but some nee
are also transferred tofilm and
I-inch tape for audio visual use I-
by schools and other groups. equ
fro:
THOUGH THE CENTER is rat
basically a professional opera- altl
tion, there is some limited in- tha
volvement by students, especially is r
from the University's speech de- WO
partment. Seniors and graduate i
students majoring in radio and ope

aids

uF

education

3035 Washtenaw across from Lee Oldsmobile

brings on a fantasy world of
highly paid glamourous s t a r s.
gifted directors and producers,
fame and wealth. It also sug-
gests such things as "The Bev-
erly Hillbillies," "Gilligan's Is-
land," and "I Dream of Jean-
nie," generally defined as schlock.
But the University Television
Center rovides neither of these.
In fact, it is a talented group
of professionals whose purpose it
is to provide educational tele-
vision programs (and to a lesser
extent, films) and to aid the
University in its use of the
broadcast and video tape media.
The center's activities are di-
rected towards the production of
educational television programs
which are broadcast by commer-
cial stationis.
The center's programs can be
seen -on Detroit's channel 4 at
6:30 a.m. on weekdays and noon
on Sundays. However, numerous
other stations across the state
and across the country. use the
programs as well. The programs
- '~
.
r t

tance and equipment whenever
eded by professers or students.
[ALF INCH VIDEO tape
uipment c tn also be rented
)m the center at rather low
es by. professors and students,
hough the center makes sure
t the purpose of the rental
related to University academic
:rk.
the center is a self-contained
ration, with its own studio,

television can apply for intern-
ships at the center in various ca-
pacity, including praduccion, di-
rection, television administration,
art and graphics. Some students
also participate through the work-
study program.
Part-time, irregular jobs with
the center are also availabb
upon occasion, working on floor
crews doing such things as cam-
era work. Students who wish to
have such jobs should apply at
the part-time personnel office in
the Administrative Services Bldg.
When the center needs new crew
people, they contact those who
have such applications on file
and'hold workshops for potential
crew members.
In addition to their television
programming, the center als)
works with the University, at-
tempting to provide technical as-

engineering facilities, staging an .1
arts departments. Nevertneless,
the resources of the Universi-v
are just too good to pass up. As
publicity man David Friedo puts
it, "We draw from the rest of
the University for our shows,
using the resources of extremely
talented people in all areas.'
The center also does s o m e
work with film, although to a
lesser extent, one reason being
the cost. and time involved in
film production. Much of the
film work is used for short tele-
vision segments shot outside the
studio, where it is impractical
to lug heavy video tape equip-
ment.
THE CENTER has also pro-
duced some longer films meant
for the screen, including t h
award-winning "Lisa's World,"
about a young retarded child. It

"The center's activities are directed to-
wards the production of educational tele-
vision programs which are broadcast by
commercial stations."
nafit: ; .{; ."' :^:::?4.:^ "Xi P:YY:^y,,4+ .^.-re a

has produced innovative "trigger
films," short films dealing wiuh
a particular subject such as ag-
ing, designed to create a strong
impact and trigger group dis-
cussions about the topic.
Presently located in two rent-
ed buildings - one on Maynard
St., the other on Liberty St. -
connected by a walkway (the of-
fice is on the Maynard St. en-
trance), the center will be mov-
ing to a new location in its own
building on Fourth St. this fall.
The center also features a
"peanut gallery" where whatever
tape the staff happens to be
testinghat the time is shown on
a screen in the hall and can he
viewed by anyone.
The center is now responding
to increased interest in audio-
visual teaching at the University.
At present use of videotape and
television here is somewhat lim-
ited, although such facilities)are
used in some schools, such as
dental, medical, law and the Eng-
lish Language Institute.
JOSEPHINE WENK, business
manager, points out that tele-
vision can be a valuable aide to
teaching, if used right, "The 'U'
has gone slower thantmany uni-
versities, cautiously, testing, so
where they have used it they
have done a good job. It hasnt
fallen apart and died like at some
universities, where they went too
big too fast."
The basic goal of the center is
to provide educational program-
ming and media aids to learning,
both within the University and
without. As Wenk puts it it is
"certainly not just an equin-
ment rental outfit."

Alpha Waves
Biofeedback
Monitoring Device
*COMPLETE VOLUME AND
THRESHOLD CONTROL.
* BAND PASS SWITCH FOR THETA,
ALPHA, BETA FREQUENCIES.
* CALIBRATED GAIN CONTROL.
* BATTERY STRENGTH INDICATOR.
* DURABLE ELCTRODES WITH
HEADBAND.
UNASSEMBLED KITS with schematic,
easy-to-follow instructions-$60
ASS,.MBLED KITS with warranty-$85
Send check or money order to
BIOMA THIC
COMPANY

Daily Photo by TERRY McCARTHY

Farmer's Market:~
A 'psychical trip

f
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809 Hill St.-Suite 2
ANN ARBOR, MICH. 48104

" . " . ...'i", r...." . . . . . . Y . ,"@i . . . . . .. } i ' " .r r . . . . . . . . . . .. ........,...
2 CREDITS $10 LAB FEE
PROJECT OUTREACH
Department of Psychology
Experimental learning in over 25 different set-
tings -penal facilities, mental institutions, hos-
pitals, community s e rvi c e s, schools, halfway
houses, homes, etc.
If interested: COME TO-
OUTREAC-H MASS MEETING
Tuesday, Sept. 11 7:30 p.m.
HILL AUDITORIUM
Questions?- Registration Information and Procedures?-
COME TO Corner House (introductory Psychology Building)
554 Thompson Street (corner of Thompson and Madison)
or call 764-9279, 764-9179
Psychology 201 No Prerequisites

By DIANE LEVICK
supplement co-editor
Sauntering through Ann Ar-
bor's Farmer's Market can be an
enlightening psychical as well as
a delightful gastronomic experi-
ence.
An excellent spot for "people-
watching," the open - air Farm-
er's Market attracts browsers
and buyers from all walks of life,
who come to view the day's local
produce, baked goods, plants,
and handicrafts.
In the crowded festival - type
atmosphere, one usually also
finds people - often young chil-
dren - trying to sell their pets'
puppies and kittens. Camera
bugs, take heed!
Located, on Fourth St. past the
corner of Detroit St., the Far-
mer's Market consists of num-
erous stalls, each with its own
specialty. Common in the fall
are apples, apple cider, anid
squash, while summer brings the
harvest of tomatoes, strawbe-
ries and flowers.
third!
o tively charged that voting for
e. HRP only splits the city's "liber-
- al vote" and allows conserva-
, tive Republicans to attain of-
- fice. To expand its base outside
the student community, HRP
N musttbeatthe spoiler rap. The
;,fact that the recent election re-

Factions

a

Daily Photo by TERRY McCARTHY
f id
It is clear that if HRP is t
regain the glass slipper they ar
going to have to find it them
selves. In the realm of politics
princes generally only come rid
ing by once.
And so the debate at HR.Pnov
centers on what went wrong

(Continued from Page 3)
than the honchos, and favor wid-
ening the party's base.
The moderates' candidate for
state representative nomination
withdrew from the race under
pressure from the honchos.
The Rainbow People physically
withdrew from the party, partly
over the decision not to run a
candidate for county sheriff and
partly because they believed
HRP was turning its back on its
"true constituency" (i.e. street
freaks).
The clock began to strike
twelve. The ensuing November
election was a disaster for HRP.
Their candidates were upset by
Democrats in two county com-
missioner races and state rep-
resentative hopeful Steve Burg-
hardt was soundly defeated by
radical Democrat Perry Bullard.
IN THE MONTHS following
the November debacle, faction-
alism grew, finally erupting in
bitter primary battles for the
April city election with the hon-

chos (now officially the Debs
Caucus) running Ann Bobroff for
mayor against the moderates' Be
Kaimowitz and the Rainbow peo-
ple running John Sinclair's broth-
er David against the moderate's
Frank Shoichet for the Second
Ward city council nomination.
In both cases, the moderates
were triumphant but it was not
without cost. The Rainbow peo-
ple - in contrast to the elec-
tion a year ago - were notable
for their absence from the 1973
campaign. And Debs caucus
members made little effort to
conceal their lack of enthusiasm
for the party's mayoral candi-
date.
Again HRP suffered a serious
defeat, making a poor showing
in the mayoral contest and fail-
ing to win in either of the wards
they had swept the year before.
IT IS NOW midnight for HRP.
The magic they had in 1972 is
gone and their coach has turned
back into a pumpkin. It is an
open question whether they will
recapture the , magic and live
happily ever after or fade into
oblivion - a mere reminder of
activist days gone by.

YOUNG ARTISANS sell their
leather work, colorful ties, and
handmade jewelry, resisting se-
duction by the aroma of freshly
prepared fudge, bread, and cook-
ies from neighboring stalls.
Although the Farmer's Market
is open from 8 a.m. to ,3 p.m.
Wednesdays and Saturdays, it's
a good idea to go early in the
morning to get the best selection
of goods because business is
brisk.
And, if you enjoy weird spec-
ialty foods, check out the Kerry-
town market next door. Keeping
regular business hours, ]Kerry-
town houses an assortment of
specialty food shops which offer
fish, Oriental products, and deli-
catessen, just to name a few
items.
Whether you truck down
Fourth St. intending to fill your
stomach or to broaden your con-
cept of the Ann Arbor commun-
ity, the market-place has some-
thing for you.
)arty,
The Rainbow People, on the
other hand, want a return to
hippie - oriented rock ''n roll
politics, catering to the street
people base.
The moderates want more of
the same.HThey seek a broad
base for HRP, reaching out to
people now on the left ringe of
the Democratic Party. They fear
that following the line of tither
of the party's minority factions
would result in political isola-
tion and almost certain defeat in
future elections.
This struggle within the party
is likely to last well into the fall.
In the end, it seems likely that
the moderates who represent the
clear majority sentiment of the
party, will win out.
IT COULD BE a Pyrrhic vic-
tory, however, for a moderate
take-over could well result in the
permanent alienation from HRP
of the Debs and Rainbow fac-
tions.
Trying to wage an election
campaign next spring at less
than full strength could be a dis-
aster for HRP. And th party
cannot afford another disaster.
They lost two important elec-
tions last year. And for Cinder-
ella parties, as well as Cin-
derella teams, three strikes is
out.

"Trying to w a g e an election campaign
next s p r i n g at less than full strength
c o u I d be a disaster for HRP. And the
party cannot afford another disaster."
.A . iA :i.a ::: i;";" "{f' '.v :": °r' : . " . .>

whether it can be fixed and if
so, how.
Some of the problems are ob-
vious., For one thing, students
who flocked to the polls in droves
to sweep HRP into office in 1972
simply didn't bother to vote. The
drop in turnout in student pre-
cincts between 1972-1973 was dra-
matic.
Further, HRP has yet to rid
itself of a "spoiler" image.
D e m o c r a t s have effec-

I

suited in a conservative GOP
take-over of city hall will not
help them.
WHETHER- these problems and
a host of others can be solved is
unclear. And the party is deep-
ly divided on how to go about
dealing with them.
Both the Debs Caucus and the
Rainbow faction essentially are
arguing for a narrower base.
The Debs Caucus wants a re-
turn to a more ideologically ra-
dical base, charging that HRP
has been drifting toward the
right under the influence of its
moderates.

U

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PIZ,

PON get the

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