100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 06, 1973 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September 6, 1973

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. Y,

It, I

LOOKING FOR A VIABLE LIFESTYLE ALTERNATIVE?
CO-oils
THE BETTER WAY
There are students and community co-ops at U-M and hundreds
of other campuses across the U.S. and Canada. To find out
more about co-ops, come to'
NORTH AMERICAN STUDENT
COOPERATIVE ORGANIZATION
LEARN THE BETTER WAY
Literature and information on the co-op movement, how to
start co-ops, etc.:
NASCO . . Students of Cooperation-4th floor,
Michigan Union-663-0889-
RKPILZZA
# 769-8030
s

Crisis counseling
available to women

By SUSAN SOMMER
The Women's Crisis Center is
prepared to counsel women on
rape and problem pregnancy. But
its all-purpose s e r v i c e s can
assist the men of Ann Arbor as
well as the women-if the men
aren't scared off by the center's
name.
Located in St. Andrew's Church
on North Division St., the Crisis
Center has telephone and walk-in
peer counseling with trained vol-

unteer counselors to dispense
concern or information or what-
ever combination is required.
"We don't push any alterna-
tives," says Leslie Horst, a Crisis
Center counselor and organizer.
"We help sort out feelings which
is the first step along the road
towards making decisions."
With questions ranging from
"What contraceptive m e t h o d
should I use?" to "How do I get
a low-cost lawyer?" the center

has also developed an extensive
referral service.
It is the center's goal to be a
"true community agency" which
accounts in part, according to
Horst, for its off-campus loca-
tion.
THE WOMEN'S CRISIS Center
was organized in the fall of 1971,
when an alarming increase in
rape incidents drew concerned
community women together.
Coordinators say the only re-
quirement for counselor training
is that the applicant be a wo-
man. High school and college stu-
dents, straights and gays, pro-
fessionals and housewives are all
equally needed and welcomed.
Training consists of an -inten-
sive weekend-20 hours-of dem-
onstrations, simulations a n d
theory sessions, all designed to
sensitize the trainees to others'
feelings. Any screening necessary
occurs as part of the training
process.
In addition to counseling, cen-
ter staff members are concen-
trating efforts on a rape educa-
tion project which will culminate
in a free publication, dealing
with facts about rape, ideas for
defense and sources of support
for victims. Organizers hope to
distribute 20,000 copies to com-
munity women.
ALSO AFFILIATED with the
Women's Crisis Center is Fem-
inist House, a coordinating center
for such women's groups as the
Gay Awareness Women's Collec-
tive and the Women's Community
School.
Proving to be a model for crisis
centers as far removed from Ann
Arbor as Anchorage, Alaska, the
Women's Crisis Center staff finds
energy in their "dreams" for
the future.
"Many hope someday to have
one location of their own, a multi-
purpose center with medical and
counseling services and feminist
activities all available," says
+ Horst.

Daily Photo by TERRY McCARTHY

I

Campus pinbal

I

0 0

0

4

MIlCMBODY,

a study in, futility

IDI YES
fyou

Daily Photo by TERRY McCARTHY

at National Bank & Trustfl
COMPANY OF ANN ARBOR Member FDIC
Come bank with us-
Campus Office: William at Thompson.

/

Subscribe tc
The Daily

This fall, though, and probably
for some time to come, the Wo-
men's Crisis Center remains in
St. Andrew's Church with one
room to call its own, but with a
- number of volunteers to call the
community's.

....0

By MARTIN STERN
"It's fun to play. Sort of like
your whole lifestyle. Sometimes
you have it, and sometimes you
fuck up."
These words of wisdom, spoken
by Art Rouse, a local pinball ad-
dict, more or less sum up local
sentiment over Ann Arbor's fast-
est growing sport: pinball.
A year ago there were only two
pinball halls on campus. There
are now at least seven, and
they're usually crowded: Tom-
my's Holiday Camp, Cross-Eyed
Moose, Pinball Alley, Summer
of Forty, Too (upstairs), Dragon
Inn, and Lew's Cellar Arcade
(at two locations).
Why the upsurge in popularity
of pinball machines? No one real-
ly seems to know.
"NOTHING'S SO special about
pinball. You just try to beat the
machine," says Preston Grant,
"O an employe at Tommy's. "It's
weird that anyone would play-
you don't get anything substan-
tial back."
The pinball machine, for those
of you not in the know, is, as de-
fined by Webster's Third Inter-
national Dictionary, an amuse-
ment device "that consists of a
glass topped cabinet in which a
ball propelled by a plunger rolls
down a slanting surface among
an arrangements of pins and tar-
gets with each contact between
ball and target scoring a num-
ber of points indicated by a sys-
tem of electric lights."
Furthermore, when the ball
reaches the bottom of the slanted
surface, the player can- try to hit
it back up with the assistance of
button - manipulated flippers.
Some players also attempt to
gently shake the machine to af-
fect the ball's path.
David Hamilton, another pin-
ball fan, has been observing the
game and its players and be-
lieves that interpreting the popu-
larity of pinball is "a study in
futility."

"IT'S NOT SO much a chal-
lenge as watching yourself ac-
complish something so worth-
less," Hamilton comments. "It
seems like you're making some
sort of progress . . . you watch
yourself begin accumulating, but
you never win."
The futility of losing often
leads pinball players to ex-
tremes, such as violently shak-
ing the machine, which will us-
ually "tilt" it and shut it off,'
adding to the futility. Many pin-
ball >players also express their
frustrations by cursing the ma-
chines.
Mike Luve, manager of Lew's
Cellar Arcade on State St., does-

n't really think that pinball is so
popular, but rather that "people
have lots of free time and mon-
ey to spend, and want something
to do. And beating the machines r
is something to do."
LUVE ALSO believes that the
pinball arcades are popular be-
cause "they're a good place to.
get a date." One girl, he says,
leaves all the time with a dif-
ferent guy on her arm.
Whatever the reason, however,
the pinball halls do seem to be
the place to hang out. So, if you
have free time and like futility,
friendships, and flippers, Ann
Arbor has a place for you.

FC

GULL

k y

olrbos

Telephone
761-8632

N

k-

mAntique Paintings
UContemporary Paintings
UPottery and Sculpture
mAntique Clocks
*Commission Paintings
aRestorations
- ACROSS FROM
THE SEARS
* PARKING LOT
ON ASHLEY
SOMETHING
FOR EVERYONE

r" lqmlc 4"

S

S8OUTH ASHLEYaA %.~c

209
So.-
State
HANDMAKERS of quality leather garments, bags, sandals.
"Buck" knives Dyer's Elk Moccasins

I

Daily Photo by DAVID MARGOLICK

i
,
i
M
E

byFz.,ntmnt
Ph- 761-3485
e man

P.

l~

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE
ULRICH'S GUARANTEE:
IF OUR PRICES ARE NOT COMPETITIVE-A FULL REFUND
WILL BE GIVEN as long as the item is RETURNED within
--t1 /w % % 1r /A 2 M. r- w~f tP I A 2Af P I9

U

II

m

1 ^ A^ %1/ ^ OF* a"r no r 11

11 1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan