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October 18, 1973 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, October 18, 1973

S

I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Paae NA

IHE MICHIGAN DAILY I~ciru~ Nm.

" u c:. s cw

I

Badger

line

'Jr

powers

strong ground attack

By JOHN KAHLER
What can be expected from a
team that lost a star running
back and a fine quarterback
from an offensive unit that was
none too powerful to begin with?
A losing season, one would sus-
pect.
Well, the Wisconsin Badgers
currently sport a dismal 1-4 won-
loss record, but few people are
blaming the offense. That unit,
especially the running game, has
performed surprisingly well to
date, despite being shut out by
Ohio State last week.
The highlight of the season
for the Badgers was their lone
victory over Wyoming, by a
score of 37-28. Sparking that
victory was a running attack
that blasted out 548 yards total
against the hapless Cowboys.
Wyoming is not noted for its
tough defensive play. As Wiscon-
sin offensive coach Ellis Rains-
berger noted, "Ohio State's de-
fensive .backs were as big as
Wyoming's linebackers." But the
Badgers were also able to move
the ball on such people as Ne-
braska and Colorado, and should
provide the Michigan defense
with possibly its stiffest test to
date.
The leading rusher from "the
lair of the Badgers" is half-
back Bill Marek. In four games
he's piled up 488 yards rushing,
including 226 against Wyoming.
Another sophomore, fullback Ken

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITORS:
JIM ECKER
MIKE LISULL
Starch, rolled up 184 yards in
13 carries in the same game.
With this pair, the departure if
heralded Rufus "Roadrunner"
Ferguson has been less than un-
noticeable.
Up front opening up the holes
is an offensive line that Bo
Schembechler describes as an
"excellent blocking unit." Coach
Rainsberger agrees: "The
strength of our line is our inter-
ior blocking."
But injuries might change this
p i c t u r e considerably. T h e
Badger line's key player, center
Mike Webster, is reportedly
nursing a sore, ankle, while,
guard Dennis Manic is a doubt-
ful starter with a sprained
ankle. When healthy, Webster
combines strong blocking with
fierce competitiveness and is a
genuine All-America candidate.
The rest of the line is almost
as good. Guards Manic and Bob
Braun, along, with tackles Bob
Johnson and Dennis Lick, team
with Webster to give the Badgers

a combination of size and experi-
ence more formidable than is
usually seen in the Big Ten.
Junior Gregg Bohlig will re-
place the graduated Rudy Stein-
er at quarterback for the Cardi-
nl and White. Bohlig is an ade-
quate passer, completing 40 per
cent of his tosses against some
tough secondaries.
His receivers are better than
adequate. Tight end Jack Novak
is probably the best, but has
been obscured by the top-notch
tight ends everyone seems to
have this year. He is genuinely
gifted both as a blocker and as
a pass catcher.
Shifty Art Sanger and fleet
Rodney Rhodes man the split
end position. The regular flanker
is Jeff Mack, an exceptional
athlete who doubles as leading
pass catcher and as a change of
pace runner. Unfortunately for
Wisconsin, Mack sprained a toe
against Ohio State and is doubt-
ful for the Michigan game.
The Wisconsin offense certain-
ly has a tough row to hoe. Sur-
veying the problem,.Rainsberger
claimed that "the Michigan de-
fense is as good or better than
Ohio State's." He would have
been pleased to hear Schembech-
ler's analysis of the problem.
Bo prophesied, "I don't think
we'll be able to shut out Wis-
consin."

AP Photo
PURDUE LINEBACKER Paul Schavietello's jarring tackle forces Wisconsin fullback Ken Starch (32
above) to cough up the pigskin during their Big Ten battle. Michigan defenders hope that this sight
will remain a familiar one reminiscent of last week when Michigan State fumbled the ball away six
times. The Wolverines host Wisconsin this Saturday afternoon at Michigan Stadium.

H.R.P. Mass Meeting
Rent Control Comes to AA
ON
THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 1973
AT
7:30 p.m.-Father Richard Center
St. Mary's Church--Thompson at William
AGENDA:
. RENTAL CONTROL LAW
2. PETITION DRIVES
3. TUITION STRIKE
4. FEMALE AT LARGE STEERING VACANCY
5. ANTI-IMPERIALIST STRUGGLE
6. MIDDLE EAST
If high rents and rip off landlords have got you
down come to the meeting and help change all that.
- - m - me

Sports of The Dayil
Freshmen dot B-ball camp
By JOHN KAHLER
The opening of basketball practice has given the Michigan
coaches the opportunity to check over the 1973 freshman crop.
Michigan did not succeed in recruiting the big man they had
hoped for, but so far nobody is complaining about the players
they got.
Possibly the best of the bunch is Johnny Robinson, a 6-6 for-
ward from Chicago. Considered the best cage prospect in that
hotbed of activity, Robinson led his Chicago Hirsch team to the
Illinois state championship. If he shows anything at all in prac-
tice, he should be a starter.
Randy McLean of Walled Lake Central has looked good in
the first days of practice. At 6-9, he could be an invaluable aid
to the short Michigan team. Tim Jones, a 6-5 forward from
Elgin, III., has good high school credentials and could also see
some action.
Help is also expected from the freshman guards. Steve
Grote, (6-2), who led Cincinnati Elder to the Ohio State cham-
pionship, and Bob Malaby, a 6-footer from Southfield, could be
the long-sought replacements for Dan Fife. Lionel Worrel, a 6-3
guard from Newark, was injured most of his high school senior
year, but was spotted by a Michigan scout who was checking out
another player at an All-Star game.
If some of these freshmen come through, the prospects
for the Michigan basketball team could appear a lot rosier
than they do at the moment.
* * *.
Sooner QB Star of Week
By RICH LERNER
Steve Davis and his Oklahoma Sooner teammates were all
set for a tough battle with the Texas Longhorns this past Satur-
day, but after jumping to an early lead they never let up. Davis,
a history major, .led the Sooners to a 52-13 trouncing of the Long-
horns, before a capacity Cotton Bowl crowd. He threw two sec-
ond period touchdown passes and ran for two more scores.
The 5-10, 186 lb. Oklahoma native became the Sooner quarter-
back by default. Kerry Jackson figured in earlier plans for Okla-
homa, but was ruled ineligible last April after the revelation of
the Sooners' recruiting violations.
When asked his reaction to the NCAA ruling, Davis re-
plied "Naturally I was crushed, as was the whole team. But
we still had a schedule to play and it wouldn't go away."
The 20 year-old sophomore, who only started playing quarter-
back his senior year in high school, hit on five of six passes for
185 yards. Those included a 63 yard scoring strike to Tinker
Owens and a 47 yarder to Billy Brooks.
Davis, who is a Baptist minister, does more than pass. He
can run too, as he proved in scoring from the two and the 15
yard lines. He also ran the option well, pitching to speedy Joe
Washington for repeated gains.
Rev. Davis was only recruited by two schools, Oklahoma
and Baylor, but Oklahoma was the one that "really went
after" him. When asked in a Michigan Daily interview
whether his faith in God contributed to his. success on the
gridiron, Davis replied, "No, not really. There are Christians
on the defensive team, too. God will strengthen me . . . but
when it comes to laying the ball in Tinker Owens hands, no."

I

SERIES DEADLOCKED 2-2
Staub powers Mets over

A's

NEW YORK (A) - Ailing Rusty
Staub, playing with a damaged
right shoulder, drove in five runs
-one short of the World Series
record-last night and led the New
York Mets to a 6-1 victory over
the Oakland A's in the fourth game
of the 1973 baseball championship
showdown.
The victory deadlocked the
best-of-seven series at two games
apiece with Game S scheduled
for tonight in New York. The
teams return to Oakland for the
sixth game Saturday afternoon.
Staub, who banged up his shoul-
der during the National League
championship playoffs against Cin-
cinnati, unloaded a three-run home
run in the first inning and added
a two-run single in the fourth,
providing John Matlack with a
comfortable lead all the way.
Often a victim of the Mets'
sometimes balky o f f e n s e, the
young left-hander never had that!
trouble on a cool, crisp night that
made topcoats standard for a well-
behaved capacity Shea Stadium
crowd of 54,817.
New York wasted no time get-
ting to Oakland starter Ken
Holtzman, who won the first
game of the Series.
Leadoff man Wayne Garrett

drove Holtzman's second pitch of
the game into. right center field
for a single. Felix Millan bunted
the next . pitch up the third base
line and beat it out for single,
giving the Mets runners at first
and second with none out.
Staub, the Mets' leading run-
producer with 76 during the regu-
lar season, was the next batter.
He squared around twice as if to
bunt but Holtzman's first two
pitches were high. Manager Yogi.
Berra then took the sacrifice sign
off and, one pitch later, Staub
tagged a long drive over the left
field fence about 360 feet away.
Holtzman retired the next bat-
ter, but when John Milner walked
a id Jerry Grote singled, Oakland
manager Dick Williams lifted his
starter and John "Blue Moon"
Odom relieved. Odom got out. of
the inning on one pitch-a double-
play bouncer by Don Hahn.
Matlack breezed through the
first three innings without allow-
ing a hit. But he got into trouble
in the fourth when Garrett boot-
ed Sal Bando's one-out bouncer.
Reggie Jackson followed with a
single to center and, when Hahn
threw too late to third, Jackson
took second on the play.
Gene Tenace bounced to Budd

Harrelson, scoring Bando, but Mat-' plate. Millan gave them a chance
lack avoided further trouble by for it with a bouncer to second
getting Jesus Alou on a fly ball. baseman Dick Green, but Green'
The Mets came right back in the f kicked the ball for an error, scor-
bottom of the fourth. Hahn and ing Hahn and leaving the bases
Harrelson opened with singles loaded. Staub bounced the next
a g a i n s t Odom. Here Williams pitch into right field for two more
switched to Darold Knowles, and runs and a 6-1 Met lead.,
Matlack, trying to sacrifice, struck The five-run cushion male- it
out. comfortable for M a t 1 a c k, who
Garrett was hit by a pitch, load- worked through the eighth inning.
ing the bases, and the A's brought Ray Sadecki allowed the final two
i their infield in for a play at the Oakland hits in the ninth.
Gridde Pickings
MAJOR GENERAL HARDING Fillmore Buchanan shook his fist in
ecstasy. Fifteen thousand drunk screaming delegates to the Veter-
ans of Foreign Wars National Convention threatened to demolish the
arena with their shouts and cheers.
"Yes my friends," the World War II ace continued. "Is it a mere
chance, a freak of circumstance, or is it the working of a fiendish
diabolic conspiracy, which gave the National League West to the
Cincinnati Reds?"k
The delegates roared. The foul designs of the Brezhnev-Mao-
Nixon axis had at last been exposed.
"And finally my friends," the general whispered dramatically, "let
me tell you of the greatest danger of all, a sublime masterpiece of
infernal genius which, if we let it, will destroy free enterprise and hand
us over to creeping Communism."
The multitude gasped.
"I speak of the Ghidde Pickings contest sponsored by the known
libertines of the Michigan Daily. I speak of people surreptitiously circ-
ling twenty teams on their ballots and secretly conveying them to the
Daily by midnight Friday every week during football season. I speak
of the free Mr. Pizza pizza which is awarded to the winner, even
several winners, every week. Let me inform you, my fellow Americans,
THERE AIN'T NO SUCH THING AS A FREE PIZZA!"
Meanwhile, in bucolic Ann Arbor, unsuspecting people kept on send-
ing in their ballots and winning their free pizzas, as before.

I
I
I
1

I

ANY TWO ITEMS of your choice FREE
with the purchase of Mr.Tony's
delicious 14" PIZZA AND THIS COUPON

{or... :.w.:: is*ii"::i :}}}

Professional League Standings

East
W L T Pts

Today's games
GF GA Minnesota at Detroit
Los Angeles at Buffalo
17 4

SUBMARINES & PIZZA
1327 S. University
i ~FREE., 6 3O li
FAST DELI VER Y
Offer good for pickup or FREE DELIVERY at 1327 S. University location only
Coupon expires Oct. 24, 1973
I ------ - I

N. Y. Rangers
Boston
Toronto
Montreal
Buffalo
Vancouver
N. Y. Islanders
D~etroit

3
3
1
0
4

0
I
1
1
2
3
4

1
I)
0
4
0
4
Q
2
4

7

6 21 14
6 18 12
4 12 10
2 9 13
2 10 16
2 7 14
0 9 21

NBA
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division

Vest
W L T Pts GF

Philadelphia
Atlanta
Chicago
California
Pittsburg
St.. Louis
Los Angeles
Minnesota

3
2
2
z
1
a

0
1
1
0
1
3
3

0
1
1
0
0
z

6
5
4
4
4
2
z

13
9
11
5
10
4

Boston
New York
Philadelphia
GA Buffalo
2
8 :louston
4 Atlanta
3 Cleveland
13 Capital
9!

w L
2 0
2 1
1 2
1 3
Central Division
W L
3 2
2 2
0 2
0 3

Pct.
1.000
.667
.333
.250
Pet.
.600
.500
.000
.000

1. Wisconsin at MICHIGAN (pick
score)
2. Ohio State at Indiana
GB 3. Illinois at Michigan State
4. Minnesota at Iowa
172 S. Northwestern at Purdue
2 6. Colorado at Oklahoma
GB 7. Tennessee vs. Alabama at
Birmingham
l 8. Houston at Miami, Fla.
1'' 9. Texas at Arkansas
2 10. Stanford at Washington

11. Texas Tech at Arizona
12. Southern Methodist at Rice
13. Oklahoma State at Missouri
14. Auburn at Georgia Tech
15. Mississippi at Florida
16. Air Force at Navy
17. Harvard at Cornell
18. Eastern Michigan at Kent
State
19. Miami, Ohio at Bowling Green
20. Madam Erika's Girls at
DAILY LIBELS

8 14
8 14

Western Conference
Midwest Division

Yesterday's games
Toronto 5, Montreal 3
NY Rangers 4, St. Louis 0
Chicago 5, Vancouver 0
Pittsburg4, Minnesota 2
Atlanta 4, Boston 3
Philadelphia at California, inc.

Milwaukee
KC-Omnaha
Chicago
Detroit

w L
3 1
2 1
2 2
2 2

Pacific Division

Pct.
.750
.667
.500
.500
Pct.
1.000
.667
.667
.333
.333

GB
12
1
1!
GB
1

Rumors capture Series fervor;

Portland
Los Angeles
Seattle
Golden State
Phoenix

W L
1 0
2 1
z21
1 2
1 2

Wm.. Yesterday's results
W ill a m sMiwackee 1, Golden State 95
Sre v s s ram p Seattle, KC-Omaya, ga.
f Today's games
No games scheduled
NEW YORK () - An Oakland' Yankee job when he revealed his , leaving to shake up the team after
A's player confirmed yesterdayI plans to the team in a club-house the Andrews thing," another Oak-
that mana er eDtk Wilhimrg ha me do

TONIGHT
Direct from Three Memorable Performances at the
ANN ARBOR BLUES & JAZZ FESTIVAL
Thece"r vP
BROOK. ,bLYNt
BLUES.228
RUTER

1

ud 1dlgu " vias nau meeting betore the third gaeo
told his players he would leave the 1973 World Series. The A's
the team following the World won the game 3-2 in 12 innings
Series. for a 2-1 lead in the best-of-sevenj

"He told the team he would
resign, win or lose," an Oakland
player who asked not to be
identified told The Associated
Press.
Williams has been prominently
mentioned for the vacant New
York Yankee manager's job but
strongly denied that rumor when
it wc. nrnC'antaA 4-t- him

Series. _, y
"He told us' he was in full
sympathy with us over the Mike
Andrews affair," the player con-
tinued.
Andrews, a utility infielder,I
made two costly errors in the sec-
ond game of the Series and was
sent home by owner Charles 0.

t{t
}
I

land player suggested.
If Williams leaves the club,
speculation on a successor centers
around Irv Noren, the A's thirdj
base coach. Noren, who has three
years of minor league managerial'
experience, has served as Wil-t
liams' top aide for the last three
seasons.

q enticore W
336 Maynard 1229 S. Univ.
TOLKIEN TRILOGY
In Paperback Now Sells for
$1.25/Vol. CENTICORE STILL
SELLS THEM FOR 95c. Come
Quick. Supply Limited.

--
MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY

-® - -1_ .

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