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October 17, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-17

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Wednesday, October 17, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Face tve

Wednesday, October Vi, 1973 IHE MICHIGAN DAILY

1'aae Five

Lloyd.
By BOB ELEY
Sitting barefoot and cross-leg-
ged in a WCBN recording studio,
saxophonist Charles Lloyd main-
tains that "Life is service and
the liberation of Mr. Chaos."
Having played a gig last week
at the opening of King Pleasure
-a new jazz bar on Stadium -
Lloyd would like to return to Ann
Arbor next year for the Blues and
Jazz Festival.
Tall and extremely slender,
Lloyd plays tenor saxophone and
flute, both of which require an
enormous amount of air. He is
presently a vegetarian - fruitar-
ian moving toward the "breath-

Music

is

my

rel

r

0

itarian space" where he would
eat nothing.
He believes fasting is beneficial
to the soil and admires Dick Gre-
gory for his ability to abstain
from solid food. Lloyd's longest
fast lasted three weeks, but he
hopes eventually to increase the
time to 40 days.
Lloyd practices transcendental
meditation because'six years ago
friends of his who had formerly
been "notorious" drug users took
it up and started "looking real
clear around the eyes." He
swears it "breaks up the every-
day stress of life" and frees his
creative energy.

Lloyd is concerned about our
ability to live in harmony with
nature on such a small planet.
After praising the various com-
ponents of his new stereo system,
however, Lloyd explains, "I do
still love technology." He feels it
is possible to attain the right mix-
ture between technology and na-
ture if people would behave in "a
moral and responsible manner."
Above all, the most important
thing to Charles Lloyd is music,
largely because "everyone is able
to bring to it his own experi-
ences."
He tells a story of playing a
concert in Romania and being

Olivia de Havilland recollects
glamorous Hollywood career

mobbed afterwards by people
th- ?king him for playing so many
of their folk songs. Lloyd was
delighted with the response but
had to confess that he knew no
Romanian folk songs.
Lloyd has never confined him-
self to one particular idiom. Salt-
ing his performances instead with
compositions by Sonny Rollins
and the Rolling Stones, he seeks
only to make good music. In his
own words, "Music .is my reli-
gion.,
His acquaintances in the field
range from John Coltrane, prime
exemplar of modern jazz, to,
members of the Grateful Dead.
Lloyd's fascination with jazz be-
gan in Memphis, when at the age
of eight he heard the bebop of
Charlie Parrker and Dizzy Gilles-
pie. He took up the saxophone
and by his teens was working
for blues artists Bobbie Bland
and B. B. King.;
"Super lily-white fraternity
Americana" is Lloyd's character-
ization of the University of Sou-
thern California during his years
there as a student. While study-
ing classical music, he took the
opportunity to hear jatzz artists
playing in Los Angeles. He con-
ceived a love for the music of J.'
S. Bach but also became aware
that there was an "obstacle
course" set in the way of more

ion
widespread appreciation of jazz.
After leaving California, Lloyd
went to New York City where
he worked with groups led by
Chico Hamilton and Cannonball
Adderly.. In 1965 he formed his
own quartet and recorded two al-
bums for Columbia, neither of
which sold enough to keep him
his contract. Lloyd feels that
these and countless other jazz
albums are merely "shoved in
the back of the record bin" with
no attempt at promotion or ad-
vertisement.
After switching record compa-
nies in 1966, Lloyd recorded
Forest Flower which sold several
hundred thousand copies. Even
though this album has done the
best of any, he believes the sales
would have been much higher had
the company done its job. "They
could have made a million-seller
out of 'it, if they'd wanted to,"
Lloyd claims.
About this time, Lloyd tired of
playing New York "saloons" and
went to Europe. There, he and
his group performed in concert
halls before appreciative audi-
ences, a radical change from the
secondaryattention paid them in
bars.
Lloyd feels this difference
taught some Americans that jazz
was inherently good and not to
be used as background for a
binge.

CHARLES LLOYD 'S DRUMMER SONSHIP , er r Daily r'o sbyTERRY MC ATHY
CHARES LOY'S RUMER ONSIPperforms at the new King Pleasure Jazz Clbub last F i-

day night, Oct. 12.
TV,
highlights
56 Filmmaker Frederick W i s e-
man's documentary special on
New York City's Metropolitan
Hospital
8:15 4 World Series Special: Fourth

game telecast live from the
National League champs park.
8:30 7 Movie: Peter Boyle in "The
Man Who Could Talk To Kids".
Drama about a social worker's
efforts to help an emotionally
(A st urbe gee -ag .r.
11:30 2 Movie: Telly Savalas and Dame
Edith Evans in English com-
edy "'Crooks and Coronets."
12 9 Movie: "Bullet and the Flesh."
Western with Rod Cameron.
1:30 2 Movie: "New Invisible Man."
Thriller.

wcbn
7:00 Morning Show
9:00 Rock
12:00 Progressive
3:00 Folk/Rock/Progressive
6:00 News/Sports/Comment
6:30 Talkback
7:30 Jazz/Blues
11:00 Progressive
3:00 Signoff
Have a flair for
artistic writing?
If ,ycu are interest-
petn reie se
or writing feature
stories a b o u t the
drama, dance, film,
arts: Contact Arcs
E-d i tor, c/o The
Michigan Daily.

By KURT HARJU
Olivia de Havilland humorous-
ly reflected on her journey from
"The City of Stars to the City of
Lights" in the first of this year's
Waterman Town Hall Celebrity
Lectures.
The former film star who is fa-
mous for her performances in
Gone With the Wind and 40 other,
films (including two which won
Academy Awards) spoke to an
audience of over 600 yesterday in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Of her many experiences and
accomplishments, her early mis-
adventures as a young and as-
piring actress were the main
subject of her lecture.
After her first role in the film
version of A Midsummer's Night
Dream, she recalled being cast
as the leading lady in a Joe E.
Brown comedy. In one scene,
Brown and she were to row out
to the middle of a muddy lake
and capsize the boat.
She found out just before the
shooting that the company and
cast had decided not to use a dou-
ble for the actual capsizing in or-
der to sink her high-flung Shake-

spearian notions. She got the best
of them by going straight to the
bottom and staying there until
most of those present were in the
water looking for her.
The nine films she made with
Errol Flynn -- from Captain
Blood to They Died With Their
Boots On - were also a source
of some fond memories.
During a costume change,
Flynn-planted a dead snake in a
dress she was to have put on.
She was so frightened she ran
waist-deep into another muddy
lake to the sound of his muffled
laughter.
"I found out later that it was
his way of showing affection,"
she laughed, "though I couldp't
have kgown it then."
During the Filming of Gone
With the Wind, she remembered
Clark Gable threatening to quit
the acting business because he
was too embarrassed to cry in the
scene where he regrets pushing
Scarlett down the stairs. It was
only after alot of encouragement
that she and the others were able
to convince the fuming Gable
that he could do it.
Of her own role as Ashley's
compassionate wife she said,
"She's the woman I've always

wanted to be; she's happy be-
cause love is her strength."
The last time she saw Gone
With the Wind, most of her co-
stars had passed away and the
Hollywood film industry *as dy-
ing, but' she recalled thinking
that "They're alive. The movie is
about survival. I, like the indus-
try, have found a new form in
which to continue."

CU LT URF _______1"EAN~
FILM-Ann Arbor Film Co-op presents Penn's Bonnie and
Clyde in Aud. A, Angell Hall at 7 and 9 tonight; Cinema
Guild features Land's M at the Architecture Aud. at 7 and
9:05 tonight; Art Film Series B presents Rousseau and
Munch in the MLB Aud. 3 at 7 and 9 tonight.
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC-The 1973 Contemporary Music
Festival presents the 'U' Chamber Choir and 'U' Sym-
phony Orch. with Thomas Hillbish as conductor in Hill
Aud. at 8 tonight.

The thrill ain't gone
B. B. King will perform this Friday night, Oct. 19 in Hill Aud.
at 8. Tickets are still available for this UAC-Daystar concert which
will also include Radio King and his Court of Rhythm.
"AJOY! STUNNING! BEAUTIFUL!"
-NY TIMES -SATURDAY REVIEW -PLAYBOY
PARAMOUNT PICTU.RES prueaI.
A SHE FILI
Zurnms
RANCO ZE'EREU-
ROMEO c*
&JULIEATECHNICOLOR
ENDS THURSDAY!
Open Daily at 12:45
Shows at 1 pm.'-330-6:10-:45
COMING FRIDAY-
"THE OUTFIT"
Ui

NEW JAZZ CLUB'
FEATURING
'THE NEW-GIL EVANS
20 pc. orchestra
Thurs., Fri., Sat.
October 18-19-20
LARRY CORYELL
October 25
(ONE NIGHT ONLY)

OPEN DAILY AT 12:45
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
HELD OVER-3rd HIT WEEK
DON'T MISS IT4
Rated G
CA NOR?MAA\'u' N)
"JESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR

FRITZ LANG'S
-M
PETER LORRE plays a psychopathic
child murderer in his first film role. The
underworld, under pressure from police
; because of the killings, go after him.
~. <,.This 1931 film is also famous for its
experimental use of sound and lighting.
Fritz Lang's finest film and personal
favorite.
SHORT: RENE CLAIR'S LA TOUR
THURS..: MALCOM X
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
CINEMA GUILD Tonight at. ADM$
7 and 9:05

I

U'

UAC-DAYSTAR Presents 2 HOMECOMING CONCERTS ...

I- 1

kb
k~nt

ENDS TODAY
OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
"BRILLIANT.
IMPRESSIVE.
AWESOME.
EXTRAORDINARY:
- Peter gr? da o . thN ew ).V

i

STARTS
THURSDAY!

II
Could Never

Have

Sex

WITH ANYONE WHO
HAS SO LITTLE
REGARD
FOR MY HUSBAND"

this f riday
Oct. 19
hill aud.
show begins at
8 p.m. with
RADIO KING and
his COURT OF RHYTHM
with
The Soulful Soulmates
$3.50-4.50-5.00-5.50
reserved seats

I

ml

I

Brian DePolma DOUBLE FEATURE
" SISTERS' provides moviegoers with the special satisfaction of
finding a real treasure! A homage by a gifted young director,
Brian DePalma, to Alfred Hitchcock."
Richard Schickel, Time Magazine
No one will be SIAMESE TWINS
seated during AT BIRTH --
SHOCK- ...Nowcut asunder!
RECOVERY ;
PERIOD! ,

"THE INCOMPARABLE KING OF THE BLUES"

GOOD SEATS STILL AVAILABLE

2333 E. STADIUM BLVD.

__i__ Ads ...1i__

I

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