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September 06, 1973 - Image 48

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-06

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Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 6. 1973'

-- I r-

i

Intra-Murals:

Fun

and

By BRIAN DEMING
Between the first quaddieburg-
er and the last Gino Giant, be-
tween the first toke and the last
demonstration, between the first
dreary lecture and the last skip-
ped recitation, between the first
Saturday night and the last
morning after, there comes a
time in the life of every U of M
resident when he or she craves
for a bit of recreational fulfill-
ment that only physical exercise
can bring. It is then the cor-
pulent resident may turn to the

University's vast intramural
program for enrichment of the
weak and flabby physique.
Intramurals at the University
of Michigan provide opportuni-
ties for participation in organiz-
ed sports throughout the year.
There are nine divisions avail-
able for -every member of the
University cqmmunity for ath-
letic competition on an individ-
ual or team basis.
The women's division is sub-.
divided into three competitive
areas: independent, residence

hall, and sorority. There are
championships for women, both
student and faculty, offered for
golf, softball, tennis (singles and
doubles), track, cross country,
powder puff football, paddleball
(singles and doubles), racquet-
ball (singles and doubles), bad-
minton (singles and doubles),
basketball, foul shooting, bowl-
ing, volleyball, table tennis,
swimming, and squash.
For all students living in Uni-
vgsity residence halls competi-
tion is available in the residence
hall division. 25 residence hall
teams compete annually in this
division. In the fall there are
championships in golf, outdoor
track, tennis, softball, cross
country, h a n d b a11, football,
wrestling, and water polo. In the
spring there are championships
in swimming, basketball, bowl-
ing, paddleball, track relays,
volleyball, open swim meet, in-
door track, table tennis, and
foul throw.
THE FRATERNITIES compete
for 21 sports championships. The
fraternity division is open to all
actives and registered pledges of
the undergraduate social frater-
nities on campus.,
The all-campus division, open
to all eligible members of the
University community, is high-

TI-UMBDY
;ae
at National Bank & Trustf
COMPANY OF ANN ARBOR Member FpIC
Come bank with us-
Campus office: William at Thompson.

lighted by competition from the
best individual and duel sports
participants from all divisions
competing for 25 championships.
The graduate division is open
to those enrolled in the Rackham
Graduate School or one of the
graduate professional schools.
For faculty, administrative
staff, and research assistants
there is the faculty' division.
THE CO-RECREATION divi-
sion competes in ten activities
throughout the academic year in-
cluding badminton, basketball,
frisbee, golf, paddleball, racquet-
ball, softball, table tennis, tennis,
and volleyball.
There is also an international
co-recreation division organized
primarily for all foreign stu-
dents and faculty.
For those not affiliated or not
wishing to compete in another di-
vision the independent division
is available. About 70 teams
compete annually in this divi-
sion for 15 sorts championships.
FOR THE sports enthusiast in-
terested in concentrating on one
particular sport there are club
sports. The organization and ad-
ministration of the sports clubs
are assisted by the Intramural
a n d Recreation Department.
These club include Archery, Wo-
men's Basketball, Boxing, Crick-
et, Fencing, Folk Dance, Field
Hockey, Women's Gymnastics,
Handball, J u d o, Karate, La-
crosse, Michi - fish, Paddleball,
Pershing Rifles, Racquetball,
Rugby, Sigma Delta Psi, Soccer,
Speed Swimming, Squash Rac-
quets, Tennis, Volleyball, and
Weight Lifting. Many of these
clubs compete extramurally.
The Sports Building, located or
Hoover Street near Yost Field
House and Ferry Field, houses
most of the indoor intramural ac-
tivities. This ,building, the first of
its kind, built in 1928, holds four
basketball courts, a boxing room,
a weight room, an all-purpose
room, 14 handball courts, ter
squash courts, a gymnas-
tics room, and a swimming pool.
THERE ARE other indoor ath-
letic facilities around the cam-

Frolic
pus. Barbour Gym, Waterman
Gym, Women's Athletic Building
and Margaret Bell Pool are all
available for recreation.
New intra mural buildings will
be built in the near future to
supplement the increasing de-
mands on present facilities. The
Hockey Arena will be converted
for intramural use as soon as
Yost Field House is readied for
hockey. There will also be a
building constructed on the North
Campus and a building built on
- Palmer Field.
There are numerous outdoor
facilities on campus. Near the
Sports Building are a Tartan turf
field, Wines Field, Ferry Field
and the Ferry Field Track. Pal-
mer Field is located near "The
Hill" complex. There is also a
multi-purpose field on the North
Campus.
t Tennis courts are plentiful,
though crowded, and are easily
accessible to anyone living on

in

tight

campus. There are 39 courts
available on campus.
For golfers there are a num-
ber of courses in the area. There
is a nine-hole Par Three and an
18-hole university links as well
as the 18-hole Radrick Farms
Course.
For those competing in intra-
murals winning isn't everything.
As a matter of-"fact it may be a
completely foreign experience
for the person who has found ath-
letics only futile exercise. But
winning is not taken lightly by
Michigan's intramural program
as trophies are awarded in each
of the compefitive divisions to
the champion. Honor Awards and
All-Star Certificates are also
awarded ij. each division.
Win or lose there is no need to
sit on the side lines. Michigan's
intramural program provides not
only adbit recreation but may
fulfill dreams of athletic glory.
for the discontented spectator.

Sports o h al
By JOHN KAHLER
Did you ever dream of hobnobbing in the glamorous world
of intercollegiate athletics? Did you ever stare blankly at the
column of the local scribe on your morning sports pages and
mutter, "God, I could do better than that?" Did you ever get
an "A" for an English composition? Have you wondered about
what you are going to do with all your spare time at the big
university?
If you have answered yest to any or all of these questions,
you 'should consider the Michigan Daily Sports Staff, a group of
people dedicated to top quality journalism and cheap booze, but
not necessarily in that order.
No special qualifications are needed, although a knowledge
of APBA baseball will be a useful asset. Nor does one have to be
a male. We are proud of, the work of our female writers, and
they are treated just like'people by their fellow staffers.
All you need to do to take advantage of this wonderous op-
portunity' is to show up at the Daily offices on the second floor
of the Student Publications Building. Ask for Daily Sports. If
you don't ask, you may end up on Edit Staff, covering the Ann
Arbor city council for the rest of your career.

quarters

Order
Your
Subscription
Today
764-0558

The first person you are likely ,to meet is Frank Longo,
who holds a vaguely defined position -of some importance with
the Sports Staff. Grinning, like an accountant gone bad, Frank
will doubtless invite you up to an .organizational meeting, after
showing you the shop and explaining the miracle of the AP wire.
Between the tidbits of Daily lore he may slipi in a word or
two about the obligations of a Daily Sports Staffer. The foremost
of these is working one night a week at the paper. This is gen-
erally no problem, unless one intends to graduate summa cum.
laude. In addition, one must handle any story assignments that
the editor is capable of 'dreaming up.
Our editor is a fellow named' Dan Bbrus, a Cardinal fan, but
with few other serious vices. He will fill you in on anything you
need to know-while he subtly maneuvers you into signing to
work on Saturday for Sunday (Saturday night).
Working *as a trainee entails writing headlines, reading
proof, and being sociable to the various drunkards and de-
generates that wander into theybuilding in the wee hours of the
morning. An expertise in crossward ppuzzles will come in
handy in headline writing. Further, you will be amazed ,to learn
that "Wolverines" has two more counts than "Michigan."
As for writing, it can be guaranteed that boredom will never
set in. On any given week, Daily Sports runs advances, re-
hashes, game stories, interviews, and stories that refuse to be
catagorized. You will probably get the chance to interview at
least one ,coach, and talking with Newt Loken or Bird Carter
is a trip unequalled.
So if you are willing to sacrifice some time for the privi-
lege of belonging to the finest APBA league in Ann Arbor, of
battling wits with Don Canham, and seeing your name in print,
you are the kind of person we are looking for. Do not pass up
the opportunity of a lifetime. Join Daily sports.

{

-- ----- --- - - ----

i U

Daily Photo by TERRY McCARTHY
The Primitive Way

r-pr

~S

N

U-'

mr

Ldj

WILKINSON LUGGAGE SHOP
HAS BEEN SELLING LUGGAGE,

Billboard .
If you are interested in rooting
on the Michigan basketball In
the capacity of cheerleader, then
Oct. 4 is your magic day. At 7:00
p.m. at Crisler Arena, there will
be coed basketball cheerleading
tryouts. For all the preparation
you need, there will also be work-
outs Oct. 1, 2, and 3 from 6:30-
8:30 p.m. again at Crisler.

HANDBAGS

& BRIEFCASES OVER 55 YEARS

i
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INSTALLATION

IN MINUTES

Subscription
to:
What a bargain
for two semesters
ONLY $10
(campus area)
CALL:
764-0558
or STOP BY
420
Maynard

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IT'S NO BULL,'.',

WRITTEN GUARANTEE
For as long as you own your
car. Guarantee ho r o r e d
from coast to coast.

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THAT FOR THE NEXT ao DAYS TIS AD ENTITLES YOU TO A
20' DISCOU NT (Ends Oct. 6, 1975)

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