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October 14, 1973 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-14

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Poge Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 14, 1973

Poge Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, October 14, 1973

UAC presents
HOLIDAY BONANZA
TO NASSAAU
FIRST TIME EVER
SON ESTA BEACH "OL U
DECEMBER 30-JANUARY 6
f Round trip jet Windsor/Nassau
* Choice of air-conditioned accommodations
A Full American breakfast daily
* All transfers & baggage handling
0 Private beach, free golf & tennisI
$230 + $14 DOUBLE
$220 + $14 QUAD
For More Information
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
TRAVEL OFFICE
2ND FLOOR, MICHIGAN UNION
PHONE: 163-2147
" i

I.

WOMEN!!
Improve your Bowling
JOIN A BOWLING LEAGUE
AT THE MICHIGAN UNION
Sign up at the bowling lanes
or call 662-4431

Ford fits right in at
underwear festival

CEDAR SPRINGS, Mich. (UPI) official greetings or ceremonies.
-The man President Nixon chose
as his vice president flew home INSTEAD, THE 60-year-old Re-
yesterday to the cheers of his publican leader of the House drove
neighbors and to watch some of 30 miles north to Cedar Springs,
them parade in red flannel under waving and smiling to the few
wear. persons cheering him along the
Rep. Gerald Ford, first elected road.
to Congress in this western Mich- The first thing he asked when -he
igan district in 1948, was making stepped from his car at Jordan
his 24th consecutive appearance College, a religious academy op-
at the Cedar Springs "red flan- erated by the United Holiness
nel" festival, church in Cedar Springs, was:
The small town calls itself the "How's the game going?"
red flannel underwear capital of The game he meant was Mich-
the wrld.igan versus Michigan State, the
'I HAVE SUCH a great affe^-annual big game. Ford once played
,center for Michigan and was
tion for Cedar Springs," he said, cetrfrMcIa n a
named the team's most valuable
"that I just couldn't bring myse player in 1934. Michigan won 31-0.
Lplaye inC1934. MicyiganCwon 31-0.
to aLLanrinn INSIDE THEiacademy'stchurch

Ski Steamboat, Colorado

I

Jan. 2-7

Total Cost-$185.50

LODGING-with 600-1200 fellow Midwestern col-
legiates at luxury Steamboat Village Inn-steam
rooms, saunas, pools, restaurants, and nightclubs,
100 ft. from main lifts.
TRANSPORTATION-roundtrip charter from Lan-.
sing without trans., the trip is $71.50.
SKIING-5-day lift tickets.
APRES-SKI-FREE BEER PARTIES, MOVIES,
CONTESTS, RACES, ENTERTAINMENT
U of M SKI CLUB at 769-4905

to aoanaon my iraun
ing its festival."
Ford arrived from W
aboard a U.S. Air Force
than 24 hours after Ni
inated him as the coun
vice president.
His plane landed at Gr
ids, the town where he
and won all state footba
in high school, but there

of a enu
INSIDE THE academy's church,
ashington Ford chatted, answered a few po-
e jet less litical questions and discussed old
xon nom- friends and times. He also recalled
try's 40th his feelings when Nixon asked him
to assume the post resigned by
rand Rap- Spiro Agnew.
grew up "I was a little overwhelmed, to
all honors be frank," Ford said, "but I was
were no thrilled."
Of politics, he said he considered
Agnew a good friend and that he
believed he could carry out Nixon'sAPh
wishes in handling both foreign REP. GERALD FORD (R-Mich.) sits in his Washington,I
and domestic issues. office in January 1949 during his freshman term in the House.
Generation will publish again

TOO MUCH-
SOUND.
FOR
TOO LITUE
MONEY

hoto
D.C.

11

(Continued from Page 1)
an outlet like Generation is a ne-
cessity."
THE FIRST ISSUE of Genera-
tion this year will come out in De-
cember, with a second issue ex-
pected in the spring. The deadline
for submitting work was October
10, but the staff says they still
welcome late entries.
Since its inception 23 years ago,
Generation has won the enthusiasm
of local artists for its inter-arts
idea - the concept of integrating
different forms into a single expres-
sion. Traditionally, the magazine
has encouraged interdisciplinary
artistic activities, as well as print-
ing artists' work.
In its first issue, Generation pub-
lished a plan for a cultural center
that foreshadowed the Power Cen-
ter by 20 years. Created by Archi-
tecture and Design students, the
Center design included plans for
sculpture, photographs, furniture,
LEGAL ABORTIONS
$135
National Abortion Center
19009 W. 7 Mile Rd.
Detroit 255-3985
clinics in
Midwestern cities
Licensed Qualified Physicians
BIG and TALL
Men's Clothes
0 SHIRTS to 38" sleeve
* SWEATERS to size 4x,
tails to size 2x
0 SUITS and SPORT COAT
to 52 ex. long
ALSOm
0 TURTLENECKS-big an(
Sport Shirts, big and ta

landscaping, and audio-visual me- some of the initial thrust provided
dia within and around the building. by its inter-arts concept when it
G E N E R A T I 0 N has always became more strictly literary.
maintained close ties with the Hop- Felhpim attributes the maga-
wood creative writing program, oft- ze'soigibutes t lmyga-
en predicting the winners of Hop- zine's original success partially to
wood Awards. In addition, the mag- the atmosphere of thefifties. "We
azine has sponsored music writing were working under much more
contests, poetry readings, and pho- difficult conditions and we worked
tographic essays.- harder," he claims. "There was a
According to English Prof. Mar- post-war shift away from politics
vin Felheim, first faculty advisor and war towards an involvement in
to Generation, the magazine lost the arts."
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
i"v...-:.":."I:,+"tf:::j{.r...} . .}:.. [;.r>.. -:.. S .:":<:${ s:C :..... . ~?s9.°:
Sunday, October 14 ony in Southeast Asia," Aud. B, An-
DAY CALENDAR 'ell Hal,. 4 pm.
Religion. Ethics Office: Festival of Grad.,Sch. of Business Admin.: R.
Life Pot Luck," meditapoin Roosa, Brown Bros. & Harriman, for-
Life, "A Spiritual Pot Luck," medita- mer ndersec'y of treasury for mone-
tion, worship, workshops, Arboretum tary affairs, "Position of the Dollar in
(Alice Lloyd Lounges if it rains), 6:30 the Internat'l Monetary System," 90
am.-7:30 pm.I Farnsworth, Detroit. 4 pm. (charge)
TV Center: "Dickens World: David Psysics Seminar: D. Zwanziger, NYU,
Copperfield," wwJ-TV, Channel 4, "Theory & Practice of Magnetic Mono-
noon. poles," P-A Colloq. RmA 4 pm.
Musical, Society: Bayanihan Phillip- Art Film Series: Rousseau &Munch,
pine Dance Co., Power Ctr., 3, 8 pm. Aud. 3, MLB, 7, 9 pm.
Music School: Faculty Chamber Con- Music School: Composers Forum, SM
cert, Rackham Aud., 4 pm. Reital Hall, 8 pm.
Monday,.October 15 CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
Geography Lecture: J. Beaujeu-Gar- 3200 SAB, 764-7456
nier, U. of Paris, "Urbanization in the Recruiting on Campus: Oct. 15
Paris Region," W. Conf. Rm.,Rackham, Gantos, 'Inc.; Oct. 16: Univ. of Roches-
3 pm. .er (Grad. Sch. of Mgt.), Boston Univ.,
Mus. of & Dept. of Anthropology: B. Law; Oct. 17: Indiana Univ. Law;
Bronson, SE Asia Anthro. Field Mu- wash. & Lee Univ, Law; Oct. 18: Van-
seum, Chicago, "Politics & Archaeol- derbilt Univ Law; Oct. 19: Boston Col-
-_lege Law; Oct. 22: Northwestern Uni-
versity, Grad. Sch. of Mgt. N. Y.
Univ., Grad Sch. of Bus. Ad.; Univ. of
Chicago, Law; N. W. School of Law,
Lewis & Clark College; Oct.' 23: Proc-
ter & Gamble Distrib. Co., Consortium
for Grad. Study in Mgt., Monterey In-
stit. of Foreign Studies; Oct. 24: Har-
vad MBA Program, COGME, Institute
for Paralegal Training; Oct. 25: East-
man Kodak Co., Nat'l Cash Reg. Co.,
Internal Revenue Serv.; Oct. 26: Univ.
of Pennsylvania Wharton Grad Div.

.--

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rs
d tall,
Ill

TIl MICHiGAN DAiLY
Volume LXXXIV, NO. 34
Sunday, October 14, 1973
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106: Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at-420 May-
nard Street. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (carn-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states'
and foreign)I.
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area): $6.50 local mail Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
States and to, eign )

4m 4'io'ieo~n

211 S. MAIN

Jack and Betty Fagan

CINEMA II - TONIGHT ONLY

i

SUNDAY FRENCH CINEMA
JEAN-LUC GODARD'S

1966

n MASCULINFEM INN
An updated verison of a Guy de Maupassant story which portrays "youthful" present day Paris.
Godards innovative look at the generation spawned of Marx and Coca Colo. JEAN-PIERRE LEAUD,
CHANTAL GOYA. Subtitled.

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oct. 14

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Ozu's AN AUTUMN AFTERNOON, Bogart in ACROSS THE PACIFIC, Chris
Marker's LE JOLI MAJ.

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