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September 06, 1973 - Image 45

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-06

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Thursday, September 6, 1913

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Thursdt~y, September 6, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Basketball:

legitimate

darkhorse

By GEORGE HASTINGS
The 1973 Michigan basketball
squad won't draw the pre-season
raves from Big Ten cage Ana-
lysts that its immediate prede-
cessor did.
This year's squad does not
possess the height of the 1972
five, lacks its experience in the
rugged conference play, has no
big 6.10 center, and doesn't have
a player who was once named
All-American.
Yet, despite these apparent
liabilities, 1973.74 could be a
much more successful one for the
hoop squad than 1972-73.,
The 1972 squad was chock
full of experience and talent:
seniors Ken Brady at center,
rebounding aces Ernie John-
son and John Lockard at the
forwards, and AII-American
Henry Wilmore, the fourth-
leading scorer in Michigan his-
tory, at guard. These four plus
the addition of super - sophs
Campy Russell, Joe Johnson
and C. J. Kupec was enough to
convince most observers that
the Wolverines were among
the Big Ten's upper classes.
All that potential was. left in

the scouting reports as the
Wolverines closed out with a sad
6-8 mark in the Big Ten and
finished 13-11 overall.
This year Wolverine coach
John Orr hopes that a younger,
more enthusiastic, and more
coachable squad, playing under
less pressure, will avoid the dol-
Cagers
Last Year's Record: 13-11 (6-8
in conference)
Last Year's Finish: Sixth (tie)
New Recruits: Bob Malaby, G;
Randy Mclean, F-C; Johnny
Robinson, F; Steve Grote, G.
Outlook: Need the Big Fella.
drums, mental lapses and let-
downs which plagued last sea-
son's team and turn ina respec-
table conference showing.
Led by returning Campy Rus-
sell at forward, who had a solid
year in his initial varsity cam-
paign, the Wolverines are hop-
ing to forget last year.
The Michigan men inaugur-
ated the Big Ten season well,
enough whipping their first
three opponents. Among the
victims of the early Wolverine

surge were the Ohio State
Buckeyes and Michigan State
Spartans, both of whom tasted
defeat on their own home ;
court.
The fourth loop contest, how-
ever, was the beginning of the
end for the Wolverines. Facing
a relatively young Purdue quin-
tet, the Wolverines allowed a
large half-time advantage to
dissipate and lost the game on
a last second jump, by Frank
Kendrick. After that things
went downhill post haste.
A vital showdown with Indiana
was marred by a cold day from
the field; Illinois and Iowa
gained victories over the slump-
ing Michigan club when they
outhustled and outthought the
Wolverines.
With a mathematical shot still
remaining at the title they
thought would be theirs when
the season opened, the Wolver-
ines came back strong, drilling
cellar - dwellers Northwestern
and Michigan State. In the do-
or-die fight with Minnesota, the
Wolverines died in the second
half after putting together a
very impressive first 20 minutes
of basketball.

After that stunning defeat in
Williams Arena, the club went
down without much of a fight to
Illinois, and Ohio State.
No one answer can account
for the dismal showing of the
Wolverines. Many fans thought
that Coach John Orr was not
performing his job capably
enough. They felt that with all
the talent on the ball club, the
mental lapses and the absence
of hustle were disgraceful.
Orr, himself, feels that the
amount of talent on his team
was overratedby the press in
the pre-season, while that of
teams like Indiana and Purdue
was under-estimated. "We had
more talent than the year before
(when the Wolverines finished
in third place)," he says, "but
everybody else had improved
themselves even more."
In addition, Orr felt that the
extreme pressure on the players
to win that elusive Big Ten cham-
pionship and play up to perfec-
tion every game made them
press, and ten when they did
lose,'to suffer a tremendous let-
down that took five games to
cure.
"Then," he cdntinues, "when
we dropped back in the race we
just lost the desire to win," and
the three final pitiful efforts re-
sulted.
Despite those disappoint-
ments, however, Orr looks to
the upcoming season with re-
newed anticipation. "We have
some real good sophomores
and juniors who played last
yevar, but not up to their po-
tential. I don't think anybody
has really seen what they can
do."
The foremost of these under-
developed players is Campy
Russell.
A high-school All-American at
Pontiac Central who went on to
lead an undefeated Wolverine
freshman team with 35 points a
game two years ago, Russell led
the club in rebounding with a 9.6
average, was second to Wilmore
in scoring with an 18.4 per game
clip, and was even second on the
club in assists. And Orr feels
that he could have done even
better.
"Campy played every facet of
the game well last year," Orr
remarks, "But he can do them
all even better. He was a little
too worried about the crowd get-
ting down on him last year, but
he showed that he's a great, un-
selfish, team player. This year
I feel he will get to the point
where lhe can dominate some
games by himself."
Next to Russell, both literal-
ly and figuatively, the man

upon whom Orr is counting is
C. J. Kupec. Kupec, a muscu-
lar 6-8 junior pivot-man, played
center two years ago on the
Russell freshman team, and
was excellent in both, scoring
and rebounding.
The sixth man for the Wolver-
ines last season, Kupec played
in all three positions and conse-
quently did not shine statistic-
ally. lie was also hampered by
his play on the football team, a
squad of which he will not be
part of this year.
Orr is hoping for big things
from his new pivotman, "Ku-
pec's a smart player, so last
year we used him at any posi-
tion," Orr commented, "but back
in the pivot, I think he'll be able
to hold his own in rebounding."
Guards Joe Johnson and Way-
mann Britt are two starting
holdovers from last year's team.
Both split time in the guard slot
next to Wilmore.
Johnson, a 5-10 junior, did
not have the brilliant ballhan-
dling season he did on the frosh
squad two years back and his
outside shot was quite weak
while Britt, slightly taller at
6-2, gave the Wolverines a
leaping backcourter, he did not
possess the guard's main wea-
pon, a consistent shot.
There has been some talk
a m o n g Michigan basketball
coaches that Britt will move into
a forward slot, but that is vet
to be determined.
Both Britt and Johnson, Orr
feels, 'are capable of shaking the
slump which effected their floor
play.If they do, Michigan could
move close to the crown.
Greg Buss, a senior who in-
jured his knee in the first Illi-
nois game, was granted an extra
year of eligibility and should be
around to lend an experienced
hand if asked.
Though at the time of pub-
lication theaWolverines had not
landed the really big man who
could stabilize the squad, Orr
hit the recruiting" trail hard
this year and has brought to
Ann Arbor some really top-
notch players. Two forwards

and three guards highlight the
list (see box).
Orr is high on all. "They're
all leaders and winners", he
crows.
1973 marks the second year of
Michigan's three team plan. As
a direct reaction to freshman
eligibility, the Don Canham led
athletic department has made
the freshman team a non-ten-
dered squad. Coached by former
Michigan ace Richard "Bird"
Carter, it is open to all non-
scholarship players.
Replacing the frosh is the jun-
ior varsity, a squad made up of
tendered athletes who are not
quite seasoned enough for the
varsity.
With conference rivals Indiana
and Purdue returning strong
'squads, Michigan does not yet
figure in the championship pic-
ture. But in the topsy - turvey
Big Ten, that may be a real
blessing in disguise.
1973-74 Schedule
Home Games in CAPITALS
Dec. 1-SOUTHERN ILLINOIS
Dec. 4-at Toledo
Dec. 8-at Detroit
Dec. 10-XAVIER (0.)
Dec. 12-at Western Michigan
Dec. 15-DAYTON
Dec. 21-22-MICHIGAN INVITA-
TIONAL (FORDHAM, YALE,
BOWLING GREEN)
Dec. 28-29-Bruin Classic (UCLA,
San Francisco, Wyoming)
Jan. 5-INDIANA
Jan. 12-at Minnesota
Jan; 19-MICHIGAN STATE
Jan. 21-at Purdue
Jan. 26-at Iowa
Jan. 28-WISCONSIN
Feb. 2-at Illinois
Feb. 9-OHIO STATE
Feb. Il-NORTHWESTERN
Feb. 16-at Indiana
Feb. 23-PURDUE
Feb. 2S-at Wisconsin
Mar. 2-MINNESOTA
Mar. 9-at Michigan State

Daily Photo by ROLFE TESSEM
Russell . . up and in

ST IUM R ESTAURANT
OPEN 7 CATS A WEEK 7 AM TO 2 AM.
' ~SERVING BREAKFAST . '
ALL DAY .
GREEK & AMERICAN FOOD
A SPECIALTY
featuringl GREEK MENU
Tuesdays and Thursdays +...
. Z[A . STEAKS . CHOPS o CHICKEN + SEA POOL
SS .SAE NO -4 * 6

_____________________________________________ _______________ ___________________ - ______ .-.-.----.-------...--~---.-.---.-..---..- .~-.----.--..-____________ -.--....- I

MICHIGAN FOOTBALL-Still
the Best Bargain in Town
for U-M Students

1

A

I

,1973 Schedlule

I

I

Daily Photo by ROLFE TESSEM
JUNIOR CAMPY RUSSELL (20) seen passing a Beaver defender in last year's Oregon State game is
the key for all of Michigan's Big Ten title hopes.

Sept. 15
Sept. 22
Sept. 29
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 10
Nov. 17
Nov. 24

at Iowa
STANFORD
NAVY
OREGON
at Michigan St.
WISCONSIN
at Minnesota
INDIANA
ILLINOIS
at Purdue
OHIO STATE

i

N 1

d r I
Nt
1C
If

Student Headquarters for
MICHIGAN CAMPUS WEAR
SWEAT SHIRTS
(including specicl orders for fraternities,

Fnjoy Seven Saturdays
Of Action for Just $8

sororities, dorms and clubs)
JACKETS
'M' BLANKETS
FOR SMALL FRY-Sweat Shirts, Suits, Sweaters
T-SHIRTS

WOMEN'S GYM ATTIRE
SHORTS SHOES BADMINTON BIRDS
BLOUSES FIELD HOCKEY SHOES
PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS' UNIFORMS
ALL GOLF and TENNIS SUPPLIES
MEN'S ATHLETIC SUPPLIES
SHORTS, REVERSIBLE T-SHIRTS, WARM-UP SUITS, SHOES for
ALL SPORTS, EXERCISERS, PADDLE BALL PADDLES,
HAND BALL GLOVES, SQUASH RACKETS, TEAM UNIFORMS
Complete Line of TENNIS and GOLF SUPPLIES
FENCING EQUIPMENT ISO-KITS
WHITE- STAG
SPEEDO-SWIM SUITS i
COMPLETE LINE OF
ADIDAS SHOES
TRACK, SOCCER, FOOTBALL, TENNIS,
1 BASKETBALL, CASUALS,

K

WY olverines
Gear For
Another Title Run
Already there's plenty of excitement building for the 1973
Michigan football season. Seven home games and a rugged
schedule are offered at a bargain price of $18 for a season
ticket (just $2.57 per game) for Michigan students.
You'll see such teams as Stanford and Oregon from the Pac-8,
Navy on Band Day, Wisconsin in M's Homecoming, Indiana,
Illinois and, of course, the annual classic with Ohio State.
Michigan, led by exciting junior quarterback Dennis Franklin,

Student
Football Ticket
Information
Students will be charged for
their football tickets through the
Student Accounts Office. _Price
for the 7-game home schedule
is just $18, less than half-price.
Each student will be given a
football coupon during registra-
tion. The coupon may be ex-
changed for a season ticket on
the dates bsted below.
*Tickets will be distributed at
Yost Fieldhouse Sept. 7, 10-12.
H o u r s of distribution will be -
from 8.30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
+ Priority will be b a s e d on

" We look forward to
an ex citzng season
this falland hope
to have Your support
in the stands. B
-Bo Sche tbcclcr
For Ticketkl

COMPLETE LINE OF TENNIS RACKETS & EQUIPMENT-RESTRINGING
ar_ _ ._vr^ r - -L.. I t t1 _C - -4 ,,, 6 Ch,, , h- +gM-r cin Snnrf.1

i

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